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My sister has stage 4 liver. She is now on meds. for amoinua levels that are to high. She wants to come live with me as she is all alone I love her but what she I expect from her condition for now on. She also has hep c and still drinks occasionally. Now what?
11 Comments Post a Comment
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4670047_tn?1375734001
Well some one with experience will respond to you. Start looking it up. Stage 4 with hep c. Her liver will only continue to deteriorate. Ask her if she's up for treatment. There's many people on here who tell you how to get free treatment. That's just the start. It's also possible she may need to start with a hepatologist. I didn't look at your profile so don't know where you live.  Good luck.   Kitty
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Avatar_m_tn
Sorry to hear that about your sister, she has cirrhosis and sounds like she is or has started to become decompensated. She needs to stop drinking like yesterday and find a good Hepatologist... What to expect? Things are going to get a lot worse and if she doesn't make some fast changes in her lifestyle  she won't even be considered for a TP... It might already be to late for any treatment... Best of luck to both of you
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4973930_tn?1361793338
http://www.liverfoundation.org/


good site for information john
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766573_tn?1365170066
This is really sweet. Is she moving in with you so you can take care of her? I am ashamed to say I would be uneasy with someone who is stage 4 HCV and still drinks even if it is just occasionally.
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Avatar_f_tn
Yes, I am hoping when she moves in with me I can get her to stop drinking as she drinks when she is depressed because she lives alone is a widow and has no children.  She is 61.
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Avatar_f_tn
She has been told she is not a candid for transplant.
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4670047_tn?1375734001
Do you know if she's compensated or decompensated? If its decompensated why is she not eligible for transplant?? Please think about the drinking. Your a kind soul to let her live with you if it comes to that. But I'm just going to say this, if her health didn't make her stop drinking there's reason to think your not going to be able to. I hope she wants to get better. Possibly your local alonon (sp) would have some suggestions on that. Maybe remind her she's very young! I wish you both good luck!!
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Avatar_f_tn
Not sure what compensated or decompensated is. How can I find that out?
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3211536_tn?1359389169
You can love her and help make things easier for her passing if she won't quit.Some people just don't make it!It makes me cry to know that some have suffered so greatly in this life that they never even gave it a chance.She must be terrified .Bless you and you have my prayers!
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4670047_tn?1375734001
I left you a message in your profile site. I'm sorry for your situation!!
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Avatar_f_tn
A compensated liver works well and does all of it's important functions.  Although a person may have Cirrhosis (advanced scarring) and Hep C (which may continue to further damage the liver), if the liver is functioning well, then it is compensated.  
A decompensated liver does not work well and is not able to all of it's important functions.  Some physical side effects begin to appear.  The person may have ascites (fluid on their abdomen) and edema (swelling in their feet and legs).  The person may also have varices (bleeding from the esophagus) or internal bleeding (bleeding in the digestive system).  The person may also have Hepatic Encephalopathy due to high ammonia levels (mental confusion, forgetfulness, changes in moods, disorientation).  These are some of the physical signs of decompensation.  Decompensation is also reflected in the person's labwork.
It is likely that the doctor may have said your sister is not a transplant candidate because of her drinking.  If your sister's ammonia levels are high, her liver is decompensated.  Of course, as can-do said, there are various stages of decompensation and it steadily progresses.  There are medications that a hepatologist can prescribe to help manage your sister's symptoms.  It is important for her to reduce sodium in her diet, drink lots of water, eliminate red meat from her diet, eliminate Tylenol, and eliminate any iron supplements.  She should be seen ASAP by a hepatologist.  Hepatologists are usually found in liver transplant centers in large research university medical centers.  A hepatologist is the only type of doctor that can adequately manage your sister's care at this time.
It is likely that her liver is decompensated, which generally means her liver is too ill to be able to handle Hep C treatment at this time.  She will require care from a hepatologist to stabilize her sypmtoms and help prevent further difficult and life threatening symptoms.
As can-do says, she cannot drink alcohol.  
Advocate1955
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