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Phosphoric acid in colas and beverage is toxic
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Phosphoric acid in colas and beverage is toxic

I've been on this bandwagon for 30 years, every since attending an Orthopedic lecture in which the bones of children were too porous to heal or be set, or hold in screws even.

the truth is a lot of the nervousness and depression people experience with this disease and the treatment is not just due to low seretonin, it is due to the tremendous amount of calcium being lost each day.

Phosphoric acid is the culprit. Present in every cola product and many non cola's such as Dr. Pepper, Mt. Dew etc.
This acid is manmade occuring nowhere in nature.
It is so caustic the stomach dumps at least a gram of calcium into the stomach mix for every cola we drink in an attempt to neutralize this acid.
The only reason it is added...it to improve the taste...it's the pep, in pepsi...the little bite some people like.
Regular use of colas lowers blood and bone calcium levels signifigantly,
as I said, the main cause children's bone (usually the strongest) could not be set is they were too spongy from adults letting them drink several pops a day.

Switching to Hansen's products or reading labels and finding the products that don't contain this additive (like 7-up) will greatly improve your health.  You may however want to know that many of the artificial flavors are toxic to the liver....and many are actually derivatives of creosote, if you know what that is.

ok...go ahead, tell me it can't be true  : )))))))))

mb
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31 Comments Post a Comment
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476246_tn?1310999221
Very interesting! Thanks for posting this info.

Thank God I have never been much into soft drinks. When I was young it was something one would have occasionally at an outing. At birthday parties we would get hot chocolate with whipped cream in the winter or natural fruit juices. It was the same at my friends houses. Each time I was pregnant and breast feeding I would totally abstain from all kinds of soft drinks. This was totally instinctive. After a while I lost total interest in soft drinks and might have a few sips of a coke once a year or so.

I kind of carried on the tradition with my own kids. They would get a large bottle of soft drinks to share only now and then on a weekend, that's all. They until now prefer to buy fruit juices instead of soft drinks. They all love drinking water most.

I'm glad that acting upon my instinct obviously was the correct thing to do. Just looking at the stuff, you can tell that it is so unnatural, that it just can't be good.
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Avatar_f_tn
Years ago, I was told if you pour cola over your car battery terminals, it'll eat away the corrosion. We weren't allowed cola products as kids...at home anyways.
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233616_tn?1312790796
well your instincts are right on, but you have to read the fine print even on juices these days.

a study done at Rutgers shows High fructose corn syrup (added to half the juides out there) is a leading contributor to diebetes (diabetes).
Isn't that just like the food industry, make things super sweet so kids will krave their product....

HFCS is a sweetener found in many foods and beverages, including non-diet soda pop, baked goods, and condiments. It is has become the sweetener of choice for many food manufacturers because it is considered more economical, sweeter and more easy to blend into beverages than table sugar. Some researchers have suggested that high-fructose corn syrup may contribute to an increased risk of diabetes as well as obesity, a claim which the food industry disputes. Until now, little laboratory evidence has been available on the topic.

In the current study, Chi-Tang Ho, Ph.D., conducted chemical tests among 11 different carbonated soft drinks containing HFCS. He found 'astonishingly high' levels of reactive carbonyls in those beverages. These undesirable and highly-reactive compounds associated with "unbound" fructose and glucose molecules are believed to cause tissue damage, says Ho, a professor of food science at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, N.J. By contrast, reactive carbonyls are not present in table sugar, whose fructose and glucose components are "bound" and chemically stable, the researcher notes.

Reactive carbonyls also are elevated in the blood of individuals with diabetes and linked to the complications of that disease. Based on the study data, Ho estimates that a single can of soda contains about five times the concentration of reactive carbonyls than the concentration found in the blood of an adult person with diabetes.

Ho and his associates also found that adding tea components to drinks containing HFCS may help lower the levels of reactive carbonyls. The scientists found that adding epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a compound in tea, significantly reduced the levels of reactive carbonyl species in a dose-dependent manner when added to the carbonated soft drinks studied. In some cases, the levels of reactive carbonyls were reduced by half, the researchers say.

"People consume too much high-fructose corn syrup in this country," says Ho. "It's in way too many food and drink products and there's growing evidence that it's bad for you." The tea-derived supplement provides a promising way to counter its potentially toxic effects, especially in children who consume a lot of carbonated beverages, he says.

But eliminating or reducing consumption of HFCS is preferable, the researchers note. They are currently exploring the chemical mechanisms by which tea appears to neutralize the reactivity of the syrup.Ho's group is also probing the mechanisms by which carbonation increases the amount of reactive carbonyls formed in sodas containing HFCS. They note that non-carbonated fruit juices containing HFCS have one-third the amount of reactive carbonyl species found in carbonated sodas with HFCS, while non-carbonated tea beverages containing high-fructose corn syrup, which already contain EGCG, have only about one-sixth the levels of carbonyls found in regular soda.

In the future, food and drink manufacturers could reduce concerns about HFCS by adding more EGCG, using less HFCS, or replacing the syrup with alternatives such as regular table sugar, Ho and his associates say. Funding for this study was provided by the Center for Advanced Food Technology of Rutgers University. Other researchers involved in the study include Chih-Yu Lo, Ph.D.; Shiming Li, Ph.D.; Di Tan, Ph.D.; and Yu Wang, a doctoral student.

This research was reported August 23 at the 234th national meeting of the American Chemical Society, during the symposium, "Food Bioactives and Nutraceuticals: Production, Chemistry, Analysis and Health Effects: Health Effects."
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Avatar_m_tn
You will get some flack from this post...someone will come along and say you are paranoid and dont belive what you read....dont get me wrong...im a health freak...not nut....im afradi to post on health topics here now..too much negatvity for me
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Avatar_m_tn
And to add insult ti injury...commericial soft drinks are made with tap water....which i think is the most vial toxic substance on the planet
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663420_tn?1248680985
Everything is toxic in large quantities including water. If you drink to much water you can have what is known as water intoxication. People die from this. So to say phosphoric acid is dangerous would depend on how much you were really talking about. In small quantities I believe it is not harmful. Phosphoric acid occurs naturally in some foods as chemical reactions occur when foods are processed. I am a homebrewer and know for a fact that if I heat barley malt to 130 degrees it will produce phosphoric acid. Most phosphoric acid is produced from phosphoric rock and sulfuric acid. here is some info I found for uses

Phosphoric acid is used primarily in the manufacture of fertilizers, detergents, and pharmaceuticals. In the steel industry, it is used to clean and rust-proof the product. It is also used as a flavoring agent in carbonated beverages (read the ingredients list on a can of Coca-Cola), beer, jams, jellies and cheeses. In foods, phosphoric acid provides a tart, acidic flavor. A recent study reported in the journal Epidemiology (Vol 18, pp 501–506, July 2007), found that drinking two or more cola beverages per day doubled the risk of chronic kidney disease. Cola beverages have been associated with kidney changes that promote kidney stones, which may be a result of the phosphoric acid in colas.

My advise is moderation for everything.
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663420_tn?1248680985
I totally disagree with Rockerforlife on the tap water issue. Recent studies suggest that tap water is as good or better than most bottled water. I actually have very good tap water where I live but you can taste the chlorine in it. I use a carbon water filter to get rid of the chlorine taste. I work with different breweries and they all use tap water and they make some of the best beers in the world!
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Avatar_m_tn
Bottled water is worse than tap water.
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Avatar_m_tn
Filtered water or distilled is the only to go....if you think tap water is ok....you need help.....i wont beat around no bush my friend....to say tap water is healthy is insane
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663420_tn?1248680985
For more information, contact Judith Bailey, 216-368-4442 or ***@****.

Posted 3-21-00
Study finds some bottled water has more bacteria and less fluoride than tap water

CLEVELAND -- People who buy bottled water for its perceived purity may not be getting what they're paying for. They're most likely not getting adequate fluoride either, according to researchers at Case Western Reserve University and Ohio State University.

In a study published in the March issue of the Archives of Family Medicine, a journal of the American Medical Association, researchers compared the bacterial content and fluoride levels of 57 samples of bottled water with tap water from each of Cleveland's four water treatment plants.

"Only three bottled waters ... had fluoride levels within the range recommended by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency," according to James Lalumandier, a CWRU assistant professor of dentistry, and Leona W. Ayers of OSU's College of Medicine and Public Health. The other 54 bottles fell short of the recommended range of 0.80 to 1.30 milligrams of fluoride per liter.

All Cleveland tap water samples, however, were not only within the accepted range but also scored very near the optimal level of 1.00 milligrams per liter.

Bacterial counts in the four tap water samples varied only slightly, from 0.2 to 2.7 bacterial colonies per milliliter. In the bottled water, bacterial counts ranged from less than 0.01 to 4,900 colonies per milliliter. Six bottled waters had bacteria counts of 1,500 to 4,900 colonies per milliliter.

"One of the reasons people choose to drink bottled water instead of tap water is because of the perceived purity of bottled water," the researchers observe, and indeed, 39 samples of bottled water were found to be purer than the tap water. However, 15 samples of bottled water had significantly higher bacteria levels than the tap water. Of these 15, the bacteria counts were more than twice as high as the most contaminated tap water sample and almost 2,000 times higher than the purest tap water sample.

Technicians at the Ohio Department of Health Laboratories in Columbus tested the water samples, which the researchers coded by number to eliminate the potential for bias.

Despite the high bacteria levels in some of the bottled water, all the water tested is safe to drink under government standards, Lalumandier said. Still, he and Ayers conclude, "use of bottled water on the assumption of purity can be misguided."

For Lalumandier, who heads the Department of Community Dentistry at the dental school, the low fluoride content of most bottled water is a significant concern. The use of fluoridated water is a major factor in the prevention of tooth decay in children and adults, he notes. People who rely on bottled water may be at greater risk for tooth decay. According to a survey of 1,000 pediatric patients, 9 percent of the children used bottled water as their primary source of drinking water.

"Children should be considered for prescribed fluoride supplements if they drink bottled water," the researchers recommend. However, since a small percentage of bottled water contains adequate fluoride, children who drink such water should not get supplementary fluoride. That's because excessive ingestion of fluoride during childhood can cause fluorosis, a demineralization of the dental enamel that may result in discolored teeth.

Manufacturers are not required to include fluoride levels on their labels, but the researchers believe they should be. Currently, consumers must either get their water tested or contact the manufacturer for this information. The researchers attempted to contact all 57 manufacturers in their study, but were successful in reaching only 37.

The bottled water industry is one of the fastest-growing businesses in the United States, with annual sales of nearly four billion gallons, Lalumandier and Ayers said.

"Bottled water should be required to meet the same standards for fluoride levels and bacterial content as tap water, as it makes up a significant proportion of the water consumed by the public," they conclude.
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663420_tn?1248680985
Many people are going back to tap water after learning that all those plastic bottles are creating their own waste and the fact that people are learning that some of those plastic compounds are leaching back into the water and people are drinking those compounds, which can be harmful. When you combine that with the extra cost of bottled water you might realize it's not as good a deal as you might like to think. I stand behind tap water knowing that I won't be filling landfills with empty bottles or drinking plastic compounds that could be harmful and spending money needlessly. I do run a couple of small filters on my tap water though and that seems to work very well. My water comes out crystal clear with no bad odors or flavors.
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233616_tn?1312790796
thanks guys, always learning something new.

Our tap water used to be the best in the country (Oregon)...pristine forests and mountain runoff.

then some yokel decided they had to protect the cheapskate yokels from themselves who had lead in their pipes.

they decided instead on mandating all lead be replaced by a certain date..or offering rebates to those who did but couldn't afford it...

they decided instead to load up our water with potash and some other chemicals to protect the 5% of homeowners not willing to replumb.

so now we 95 can't drink the water.  Now everyone has to buy expensive filters to stand it at all.  Too bad they couldn't have seen that coming....we 95 could have replumbed everyone 10 times over with whats been spent on home water treatment now.
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Avatar_m_tn
Hum... Drink tap water, Safe?

jasper

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/23503485/

http://www.cnn.com/2008/HEALTH/03/10/pharma.water1.ap/#cnnSTCOther1

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/story/2008/03/09/ST2008030901877.html
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232778_tn?1217450711
"My advise is moderation for everything. "

I agree with that. Let's face it, our lives are short. Lots of things could kill us in enough quantity, be they natural or man-made. It's not worth spendnig your life being paranoid about this stuff, it won't make it any less likely that you will die, all it will do is make you miserable. I like a coke now and then, I don't think it is the thing that will kill me, but even if it was, so what? We all must die at some point.
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Avatar_m_tn
I use a counetrtop water distiller and you gotta see the gunk left over...just after on batch....its a brown yellow foul smelling thick slime...and black ring forms insinde the tank.....GROSS.....i did a test....i then took the clean batch of water and i cleaned te tank...i re-diid the clean water....guess what....no sludge in the tank....proving tap water is full of killer ****
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Avatar_m_tn
Deciding not to drink tap water is not being paranoind....JUST PROVES YOU ARE A SMART COOKIE
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Avatar_m_tn
Tap water is ok if its filered proberly....but to drink it straight up....YOU ONE CRAZY INSANE NUTCASE.....do i make my point?
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Avatar_m_tn
And the taste of tap water straight up is awful....I HATE TAP WATER WITH A PASSION
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476246_tn?1310999221
We buy natural juices without additives. They have some really good ones here in DK.

I personally very seldom drink juices, when I do buy some for myself, I only buy the Voelkel Juices, they are certified demeter organic direct juices. Nothing added, just the pressed fruits.
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547836_tn?1302836432
ew soda and processed/ fortified fruit juices.  the only things i drink is about water and occasionally tea and soy.

wish i was healthier diet-wise.  eating pizza right now!

L
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Avatar_m_tn
its ok to have pizza as a weekly treat...i do   veggie style tho....and its not even organic...i dont eat everything organic...just my fruits and certain foods...BTW...did ya know some commericial veggies are not even sprayed that much...like brocillli...and a few others,,,apples are the worse...and strawberries...peaches...some commericail foods are ok
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Avatar_m_tn
Did you know the pesticdes used on foods are designed to penetrate the flesh ,right to the core....washing and peeling does nothing
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Avatar_f_tn
I didn't know that! I try to buy organic but it's expensive, so many things are non-organic. You mean I'm washing for nothing? Thick skinned fruits should be ok, like bananas and oranges.
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547836_tn?1302836432
yikes!  nothing is natural anymore :(  that makes me sad
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Avatar_m_tn
nope...bananas are very heavlly sprayed...it seeps right tru the peel and into the flesh...i can post some onfo if you dont believe it...the pesticde they use is oderless tasteless ...look at cyanide...it will kill you in a second...its tasteless and odorless....just because you cant see it or taste...dont mean its healthy...its nasty stuff they use on the food...do this....go buy one organic banana and one commerical banana..mix them to gether...close your eyes ans peel and eat one....then the other...you will see what im saying...they taste totally different...
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Avatar_m_tn
Peeling the apple won´t solve the pesticide problem. Pesticides penetrate. Besides, the pectin concentrated in the apple skin is what flushes toxins from the body and lowers cholesterol. Why add more toxins to the body that the pectin can´t handle? Don´t. Eat organically grown apples


http://www.ewg.org/node/26710
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476246_tn?1310999221
The great thing about organic food is that it tastes better and somehow you get satisfied eating less than usual, because it contains more nutrients. Just from that point, you will not spend that much more. And then consider that you will be healthier and use less money on unnecessary illnesses, so in the end you will spend less money and be healthier. Even all my spices are organic. They also have more taste and you use less.

I use a counter top filter from aquasana for drinking water and a shower filter in the bathroom.
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Avatar_m_tn
You a smart cookie ...how come there is only few of you ladies on this site that know about eating smart?...BTW,,,i love himalayan pink salt
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Avatar_m_tn
There is Gator...izzy   You....who else?..only 3 smart cookies?
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232778_tn?1217450711
I think Organic is fine for those with a lot of money, but its important to recognize that its far from "perfect". While it might be healthier, it can actually be more damaging to the environment, for to be certified, it needs to be clean land, and the cheapest clean land is to clear some rainforest or similar in the Amazon.

People would be better off focusing on lowering their calories, and eating less fat, than they would about some minute level of toxin, that while may be unhealthy in massive doses is not realistically going to effect our lives in any respect. For example, a glass of organge juice, whether it be organic or not, is not that healthy, basically just sugar with some vitaimin c thrown in - same calories as a Coke. Both will lead you to an early grave if you are already overweight, but both are fine, if part of a balanced diet.
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148588_tn?1407125204
If you get your water from a municipal source, they should supply you a report of what your water contains and what the 'acceptable' levels of everything in it are. If you have your own well you should get it tested once a year.
In West Texas there are high levels of naturally occuring flouride - you can run it through a carbon filter all day, it'll taste great, but your kids will still end up with brown teeth. Strong teeth with no cavities, but brown. Also try to find out how your water is treated. A good home filtration system may require carbon filtration and reverse osmosis.
You should design your system based on what's actually in your water.
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