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Question about risk during cycle
MY BF HAS HEP C AND WE HAD SEX WHILE I WAS ON MY CYCLE. CAN I GET IT THAT WAY??
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  The Center for Disease Control Guide-lines state that a condom should be worn the first year of a monogamous relationship (or always in a non-monogamous relationship) but after that, then they give the go ahead, a couple doesn't have to use a condom.
   Hep C is passed via blood to blood contact, so unless both him and you had an open cut or sore, chances of catching it would be very slim. You being on your period may cause your cervix to be dilated,and so something like gonorrhea bacteria could travel up higher, closer to your uterus, causing Pelvic Inflammatory disease, but since you havent had any recent surgery on your Uterus, there wouldn't be any open cuts for the Hep C virus to go into, from your cervix being slightly dilated.
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No. Unless you are HIV positive and also engaging in extreme sexual practices, such as fisting. No.
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Thanks!! I'm just so worried that i will get it. We already have one child which is 6 months old and we are both worried that she may have it or will get it. We wanted more children until he got that news so now i'm scared to have anymore. Btw, how long does it take for hvc to show up in your bloodstream?? He didn't find out until about 3 weeks ago so were not too sure how long he's had it. HELP! :/
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  Oh, hmmm,  the virus will show up within 2 weeks to 6 months, but was it only an Antibody test that he took? If that is the case, then he still has a 25% chance of not having it, but only carrying the antibody.
   There are 2 other Hep C tests, that I know of,  that confirm the results of the Antibody test, one is called a Quantitative one, and it will tell him how high his viral load is, an doneis a Qualitative one, which tells which genotype he has.
    Most new cases of Hep C (around 60%)are from I.V. drug use, so if he had an incident of that, then that would narrow it down. If he has never used syringes, then he may have gotten it from a blood transfusion, prior to 1992, or he may have gotten it at birth, from his mother having it, there is a 6% chance of that.
   Another way of getting Hep C is from having a home-made tattoo done, with a tattoo gun that isn't sterilized properly, although most reputable tattoo parlors now clean their equipment well.
   He could also have gotten it from using someones' razor, or nail-clippers, or a very bloody fist-fight.
   The baby is not at risk, just keep his tooth-brush and razor away from you and baby.  And you can go and get tested also, but Hep C is rarely passed thru casual house-hold transmission.
   In terms of sex, of course anal sex is much more of a risk, because of tiny miniscule tears, etc.
   There are some new Hep C Treatments coming out in December, and more Treatments scheduled to come out, by 2015.  Since it is worrying you, then it would be a good idea to have your Husband Treat his Hep C, after the FDA approves Sofosbuvir.  If his Medical Insurance wontpay for it, then there are Clinical Trials available, which are free (or they pay you) where they use people for research subjects, that's what my husband did. Good luck, and try not to worry. Have fun with your new baby!
   Oh, one more thing:  if your husband Treats withinthe next year, they will probably still be using a med called Ribavirin, and after  that, he will have to wait at least 6 months before making another baby..otherwise there is a risk of birth defects, until all of that medicine is out of his system, some people feel more safe,waiting a year.  So keep that in mind, while making a plan as to when to treat your Hubs~  
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1815939 tn?1377995399
HCV Antibody Testing: Diagnosing hepatitis C begins with an antibody test. Antibodies to HCV can be detected in the blood, usually within two or three months after the virus enters the body. If a person is positive for HCV antibodies, he or she has been exposed to the virus in the past. As discussed above, however, about 15 to 25 percent of people who are initially infected with the virus are able to clear the virus from their bodies, usually within six months of exposure. The next step is to look for the actual virus in the bloodstream, using a test called PCR. If a person was infected with HCV very recently, called acute infection, he or she may not yet have antibodies, in which case a PCR test is necessary to confirm infection.

HCV Viral Load Testing: To look for HCV, a health care provider can request a qualitative PCR test to determine whether or not the virus is in a person’s bloodstream. A health care provider can also order a quantitative PCR or bDNA test to check for the presence of HCV and to figure out the person’s HCV viral load (the amount of HCV in a measurement of blood).

HCV Genotypic Testing: Genotype refers to genetic structure or makeup of living organisms. The hepatitis C virus has more than six different genotypes, which are numbered in the order of their discovery. Each of these genotypes has many subtypes, which were lettered in the order that they were discovered. It is important to find out which hepatitis C genotype you have, because it determines both the type of treatment, and the length of treatment; HCV genotype also helps to predict the likelihood of curing HCV.  

Worldwide, HCV genotype 1 is most common, accounting for 60 percent of cases. In the United States, 75 percent of all HCV infections are genotype 1; genotypes 2,3, and 4 are less common in the US, and other genotypes are rare. It is possible to infected with more than one HCV genotype; this is most likely among injection drug users, and people who received contaminated blood products before 1987 (when viral inactivation started), or a blood transfusion before 1993 (when effective screening procedures were instituted).



Qualitative HCV test:

This qualitative HCV RNA test detects the presence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) circulating in the blood and is among the most sensitive tests available. Qualitative HCV RNA tests are used to evaluate the effect of antiviral therapy. If HCV RNA is undetectable both at the end of a course of treatment and 6 months later, long-term cure is highly probable.

This test can also be used to confirm HCV diagnosis when viral loads are potentially very low, eg, in immunosuppressed or immunoincompetent individuals, and when patients have elevated aminotransferases with indeterminate HCV antibody tests (EIA or RIBA®). It differentiates between past and current infection and may be useful for detecting acute infection prior to seroconversion and when aminotransferase levels are normal or only slightly increased.


Quantitative HCV test:

The quantitative HCV RNA tests measure the amount of hepatitis C virus in the blood. The result will be an exact number, such as "1,215,422 IU/L." Many people refer to the quantitative measurement as the hepatitis C "viral load."
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Yeah he had a homemade tattoo done about a year ago and he has used needles before. We don't do anal sex so no worries there lol. We thought it was from the homemade tattoo but now i'm starting to think that its from the needles. He never shared with anyone though but idk. Thank you so much for all your great advice!! I'll be sure not to worry as much now. I made an appointment to get tested for first thing monday morning:) i have faith and i know that even if i do have it, it can be treated. Thanks again. :)
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