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Skin photosensitivity - how long after TX?
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Skin photosensitivity - how long after TX?

I stopped TX about two months ago but I am still getting sunburned after very little exposure - in Winter, under tree cover... Wondering when I should expect this to improve. What have other people experienced with this post treatment?
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288609_tn?1240100356
Great Question I am going to bump it back to the top.
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Avatar_m_tn
Finished treatment a couple of  Springs ago and could not go out in the sun without burning the first summer. The second summer was a little better but I still had to be very careful. This is the third summer post treatment and can actually tan but I try not to push it and always use sunscreen and a hat.  Try the Blue Lizard Line of Sun Screen products plus use cover-ups (shades, broad rim hats, etc) but for the first few months probably best avoid the sun altogether if you can. I also had a bad case of rosacea post treatment which further complicated things. It's now under control but probably something to deal with to one extent or another forever. Good luck and I hope you're not into sailing or golf
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Avatar_f_tn
Thanks.

Hmm. Well at least now I have an idea what to expect. I was expecting a fairly rapid improvement since I was only on ToX for 14-weeks. I wonder why that one takes so long to improve? Will have to try and find out.

I have never been a member of the deep-fry-crispy-tan club, but I do like my outdoor activities.  No sailing or golf... but love my mountain biking. Sailing would be a real killer.

jmjm530 - sorry to hear about the rosacea, but glad to hear at least that it is under control.
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179856_tn?1333550962
Odin,

I finished treatment 18 months ago - I'm not sure if it's because I was a vampire and HAD to stay out of the sun (I am one who learned the hard way) but still to this summer I"ve noticed that the sun is SO hot on my skin. I don't know if the meds caused this or if it's because I just had no sun last year or because the atmosphere is thinning but this second summer was really not much better than the one before.

I've taken to using sun screens and self tanning lotions to face it but as an Italian sun goddess type girl who used to worship the sun........wearing a hat and all of this is HARD.

Taking some encouragement from Jim's post.......I no longer want to tan (wrinkles wrinkles sun cancer) but I do want to be able to go OUT!
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Avatar_m_tn
Just to clarify, I'm def not going out in the sun to "tan". What I'm referring to is that when I do go out in the sun -- sports activities, etc -- I have started to develop somewhat of a tan through the maxium sunblock and coverups (hat) I use. For the first two summers I would just burn. BTW the sun sensitivity is primarily on my face so it's hard to tell how much is from the rosacea and how much isn't especially when the treatment caused the rosacea.
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Avatar_f_tn
Thanks for the info. I can't wear a hat with a broad brim when I am riding a mountain bike. I think I am going to be looking for some heavy duty block screams this summer.

I think there is possibly another interesting angle within this subject. If we can figure out more about it might help a lot of people find a helpful supplement to ease SX. I haven't got time to research it right now (HAVE to WORK!) but I am curious about the relationship between melanin, skin / immune system problems, and depression. The role of melanin in the body is greater than just coloring skin and hair.
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Avatar_f_tn
And if I remember correctly, melanin may play a role in sleep patterns too.

My point is that if TX interferes with this system, (perhaps l-Tyrosine involved?) it would contribute to a lot of very common TX problems.

Some _totally_unverified_ food for thought...

Bio-Medicine Org News 8/21/2001:
An Australian researcher suggests dark skin could be better than white at fending off fungi and bacteria. A paper by Sydney-based biologist James Mackintosh says it could explain why dark skin evolved in humans and animals living in tropical environments.

A popular theory on why darker skin prevailed in some areas and lighter skin in others, is that// the extra melanin in darker skin protects against cancer and sunburn from ultraviolet radiation. But, New Scientist reports, some parts of the body which are hardly ever exposed to sunlight, such as genitalia, throats and nasal passages, are packed with melanin cells.In mammals, melanin is contained inside vesicles called melanosomes. Larger, more numerous melanosomes make for darker skin. Mackintosh suggests melanosomes might act like lysosomes in the immune system, which engulf invading microorganisms and use enzymes to kill them.

"Melanin is a sticky molecule. The bacteria and fungi get tangled up, and it stops them from proliferating." Also, a protein called attractin is known to regulate both melanisation and immunity in humans, suggesting a link between the two.He also points out that darker-skinned people are less likely than people with fair skin to develop serious skin diseases.

It also explains why all do not have black skin. melanin is made from the amino acid tyrosine, which is also needed to build proteins. In prehistoric days when food was scarce in cold, dry areas, tyrosine was probably conserved to make essential proteins, Mackintosh says. It was only worthwhile converting it into extra melanin in the warm, damp tropics where food was abundant and pathogens were rampant.

Lifted from an alternative medicine site - please suspend belief until checked:
L-Tyrosine is important to your body during stressful conditions because your body uses and breaks down more of this amino acid when under high amounts of stress or strain.
L-Tyrosine acts as a mood elevator and regulator. A lack of L-Tyrosine can lead to a deficiency of certain brain chemicals, which can cause fatigue.

When you have low levels of L-Tyrosine, it can lead to a decline of norepinephrine and a decrease in the neurotransmitters that regulate your mood. Deficient levels of this amino acid have also been linked to depression.

Allow L-Tyrosine to help balance the stress in your life. The supplement lets off norepinephrine and epinephrine, which help your body cope and endure daily stresses.

L-Tyrosine also has an effect on your skin and hair color because it aids in the production of melanin. Melanin is what actually colors your skin and hair. Because L-Tyrosine produces Melanin, it has also been used to treat Vitiligo, a skin condition that causes white patches to form on the outer layer of your skin.

This essential amino acid helps to visibly reduce and even out those white areas. Melanin also helps to regulate the functions of your adrenal, thyroid and pituitary glands. Research has shown that L-Tyrosine can aid with symptoms of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) by stimulating the production of serotonin. When an increase in serotonin levels, a woman will experience milder symptoms.

Typical L-Tyrosine Dosage:
1 capsule 1-3 times daily

L-Tyrosine

L-TYROSINE: An amino acid that aids metabolism in the body. It helps to suppress the appetite while also helping the body to reduce fat. L-Tyrosine is also beneficial to the nervous system and can be helpful for stress reduction, poor sex drive, chronic fatigue and depression. Together with iodine, L-Tyrosine is needed for proper thyroid function. May help persons with Parkinson's disease, or those going through drug addiction withdrawal.

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