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Test Results
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Test Results

I am 47-years old (Asian) right now, I was tested in 1991 with the following results:
HBsAg -Positive
Anti-HBs                 -Negative
HBeAg -Negative
Anti-HBe                 -Positive
(Anti-HBc)IgO -Positive
(Anti-HAV)IgM -Negative

From those above tests (1991), the doctor did not give me any medication.


Then, my blood was tested again (18July2007) with the following test and results:
HBsAg -Positive (21.17)
Expected Values:
TV Negative:=0.13

HBeAg -Negative (0.00)
Expected Values:
TV Negative:=0.10

SGPT (ALT) Result: 26 U/L

From those tests above (2007), still the doctor did not give me any medication. He further said that I’m non-infective.

My questions are?
1. Why don’t the doctor give me any medication?
2. Is it possible for me to infect others? How?
3. Is there no possibility that this HBsAg becomes Negative? It's upsetting to always see this kind of result.
4. I am applying for a job abroad. Will this affect my application?
5. What is my real condition now?
Related Discussions
10 Comments Post a Comment
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217229_tn?1192766004
First - I got a giggle out of this: "(Asian) right now"

I'm suspecting you'll always be Asian, however, if you have a secret --- share... LOL! That was too cute!

Now.. I will try to take a guess at your questions - and Hopefully, if I am wrong - then I hope someone will come in here and correct me. OK? These are just Guesses --- so wait until someone confirms or denies them.

First - here's a brief on your test and how to interpret them:

HBsAg (Hepatitis B Surface Antigen)

Explanation of test results:
A positive test result means you are infected with hepatitis B.
  
HBsAb (Hepatitis B Surface Antibody)
Explanation of test results:
A positive test result means you have antibodies to hepatitis B. If you also test positive for HBcAb, then you were infected or exposed to hepatitis B virus in the past, cleared the virus, and are now "immune" (protected) against another infection with hepatitis B. If you test positive for HBsAb but negative for HBcAb, then you were vaccinated against hepatitis B and are protected by the vaccination.
  
HBcAb (Hepatitis B Core Antibody)

Explanation of test results:
A positive test result means you once were infected with hepatitis B.

HBV DNA (Hepatitis B DNA)
Explanation of test results:
A positive test result means you have the hepatitis B virus in the bloodstream and this is called "chronic hepatitis B." You may be right for hepatitis B drug treatments. A negative result means you do not have hepatitis B replicating or circulating in the bloodstream and you do not need hepatitis B drug treatments.
  
HBeAg (Hepatitis B e Antigen)
Explanation of test results:
A positive test result means you have the hepatitis B virus in the bloodstream. If you are HBV DNA positive but this HBeAg test result is negative, then you still have the hepatitis B virus in your bloodstream.





"My questions are?
1. Why don’t the doctor give me any medication? "

OK - check this out - you've got the ANTIBODIES - not the full blown virus. You've either had the virus in the past or have had HepB Immunization.

""""""If you test positive for HBsAb but negative for HBcAb, then you were vaccinated against hepatitis B and are protected by the vaccination. """"""



2. Is it possible for me to infect others? How?

I don't think so. I think you have cleared the HepB virus or have had the vaccination. There is a slight possibility that you have a chronic case of HepB ---- But I don't think so. I could be very wrong. I'm HepC - so I haven't done a lot of research on Hep B --- I know more about HepC --- and I don't know a heckuva a lot...

3. Is there no possibility that this HBsAg becomes Negative? It's upsetting to always see this kind of result.

I don't think so - I think once you've been exposed to the virus - you'll always have the antibodies - whether through illness or vaccination.

4. I am applying for a job abroad. Will this affect my application?

If your doctor has written you a clearance letter - then absolutely not. I mean - if he says you're not contagious - then you shouldn't be any problems.


5. What is my real condition now?

I think you're fine... I could be totally wrong --- But I think you were either infected at one point and cleared --- or you have had the HepB Immunization.

I would check with your doctor to confirm all of this --- and get a written order advising that you are not contagious and are healthy enough for employment or travel outside of your country.

Meki
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Avatar_m_tn
I like your (First - I got a giggle out of this: "(Asian) right now" )
I was was going to ask what was he going to be tomorrow (African or European)
Shouldnt joke I suppose.
CS
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181575_tn?1250202386
Oops, #3 is suppose to read:

3) Don't look to be negative for HBsAg because it only happens to .5% to 1% of us carriers per year :(
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181575_tn?1250202386
1)  Based on your labs, you probably have chronic inactive HepB.  You need to check your HepB DNA to be sure that you have an inactive disease.  Some MDs just check that you are e-antigen negative with normal ALT and they don't treat.  However, some people have high HepB DNA and sometimes normal, sometimes elevated ALT.  The goal of treatment is to supress the DNA count.  So you need to check your DNA count.  Don't just rely on ALT.

2) As long as your HBsAg is positive, you have HepB, and could infect others who are not immuned.  You are LESS infectious if you are indeed an inactive carrier.

3) Don't look to be HBsAg because it only happens to .5% to 1% of us carriers per year :(

4) Every country has their own laws, but there are most people with HepB hold regular jobs, even those in health care with direct pt contact.

5)  Again you should check your HepB DNA to make sure you stay an inactive carrier.  Sometimes the virus mutates to become an active disease again.  You should also get AFP (blood test) and liver sonogram to screen for liver cancer since we are at a higher risk for that.  Very few get liver cancer but it's good to be proactive in protecting one's health.

Take care.
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Avatar_n_tn
Thanks for all the comments and suggestions.

About the Asian thing, I was thinking that others might give suggestions that may relate to the area. Sometimes, more data give more specific suggestion(s).
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181575_tn?1250202386
For HepB, the "Asian" variable is an important one.  Asian are in the high risk category of being infected at birth.  They are encouraged to closely monitor their disease.
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217229_tn?1192766004
LOL - I'm humantoo - It wasn't meant to be mean... I thought it was very cute.

I hope that I didn't hurt your feelings... I can see where it might be useful information as Steven pointed out. He's very informative.

Meki
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181575_tn?1250202386
I don't think anyone was offended.  Hepatitis is serious stuff, where would we be without humor.  I really enjoy reading your posts.  Thanks for checking in on....oh my goodness, a HepB thread! But you HepC people still rock :)
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Avatar_m_tn
Been meaning to ask wots it like being on a Hep forum dominated by us HepCi’s
I think many have more than a passing interest in HepB seeing as quite a few of us will have had it.
I know I have.

Apart from that Chronic HepB & C together is not a pleasant thought.
Actually having HepC & catching HepB isn’t that pleasant either.
But it’s the same in reverse so don’t share anything with us.
Except your knowledge and compassion that is.

Enjoy reading your posts, like your pic too, wots it from.

All the Best
CS
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181575_tn?1250202386
Knowledge is power and community offers comfort right.  While the challenges are different, I think individuals with HepB and HepC are in a similiar boat.  We share an experience in trying to be proactive and to take care of our livers.  We start at the same place of being diagnosed, anxiety, and face the despair that follows.  I think we find hope at a place like this as we see people facing similiar struggles.  We feel less alone and we feel empowered because they overcome.  That's why I try to answer those with HepB, because I was them about 2 years ago.  So it's fine being on a forum dominated by HepC.  It doesn't hurt to learn more about things that could be used to protect oneself.  I think I know more about HepC than some MDs now ;)

As for my pic, you don't know where's it from?  Shame on you ;)  It's from Transformers of course.  It's the sign of the Decepticons, the bad guys.  I always liked the bad guys because they had the better toys.  I grew up with the Transformers and still have a good collection of toys from the 80's.  I saw the new movie on opening night...it rocked!  Let me stop before I go on and on on this...:)
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