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do i have hep c
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do i have hep c

I have asked this question but not got an answer. HIV test cane bk neg hrp c came bk as 0.3% m 3% dies this mean I have yep c please tell me ??
4 Comments Post a Comment
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446474_tn?1404424777
0.3% m 3%???
What was the test called?
Please post the exact text of the results so we can understand it.

hector
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Yep c. Ab Elisa (3rd gen)
Hrp c core antigen
Equivocal 3.0 fmo 1/l
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It's hard for us to answer your question because you have posted these results differently in each of your posts, so we don't really understand exactly what your lab results say.  If you could scan a copy of your lab results and post it to your page and then let us know that you've posted it, perhaps we could help you more. The Elisa is a test that screens for Hep C antibodies, I believe it's considered to be about 98% accurate, although sometimes people can have false positives.  However, being positive for antibodies doesn't necessarily mean that one has an active Hep C infection.  Some people are exposed to Hep C but then their body fights it off, and they will always test positive for antibodies.  Some people are exposed to Hep C, and they develop a chronic infection, and they will also test positive for antibodies.  If a person has a positive antibodies test, they should receive a second test called a Hep C RNA PCR test, in order to determine if they actually have Hep C virus.  If a person tests negative for antibodies, sometimes doctors will have them come back in 6 months and re-test for antibodies to be sure that it's still negative.
However, I don't know anything about the results that you posted "Equivocal 3.0 fmo 1/1" or "0.3% m 3%".  I don't know what that means.  As I said, perhaps if you could post a photo of the actual lab report, maybe we can try to answer your question.
Advocate1955
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1747881_tn?1358189534
The ELISA test is very sensitive and picks up approximately 95% of people who have antibodies as positive. However, it's so sensitive that sometimes it over-identifies antibodies in your blood as geared towards hepatitis C even sometimes when they're not. This degree of sensitivity has its advantages. For instance, when the ELISA test is negative, you can feel very confident that you are hepatitis C free. However, if the ELISA test is positive, there is a small possibility that the result could be incorrect. This is called a "false-positive" result. False-positives are most likely considered in people who lack the risk factors for hepatitis C.

When the ELISA test is weakly positive or when doctors think the test result doesn't match what they see clinically, a second test may be used to verify the original results. This test may be the RIBA test or another test, called HCV RNA, that directly measures the virus. The RIBA test (which stands for Recombinant ImmunoBlot Assay) uses a different approach to finding hepatitis C antibodies in your blood. If this test is positive, you probably have been infected with hepatitis C. It's important to realize that antibody tests usually can't distinguish between past or current infection. Doctors must use clinical information (such as medical history, signs and symptoms) or other tests to determine active or past infection.

Hepatitis C RNA
This powerful test allows doctors to see, among other things, how you are responding to treatment. It uses PCR technology (polymerase chain reaction) to detect the virus. While it's also used to establish current infection, it's mostly used to determine viral load. Your hepatitis C viral load is an estimate of how much HCV is in your blood. Since your viral load should decrease after a successful course of treatment, by monitoring the levels of HCV in your blood, doctors can accurately determine how you're responding to the treatment. If your viral load doesn't decrease, they may need to change your therapy.

In summary:
•Negative ELISA = No hepatitis C antibodies found in blood. You are probably not infected with HCV.
•Positive ELISA = You may have HCV infection. However, it's possible this is a false-positive. More testing is required.
•Negative RIBA = No hepatitis C antibodies found in blood. You are probably not infected with HCV.
•Positive RIBA = Hepatitis C antibodies were found in your blood using a very sophisticated lab test. You probably have been infected with hepatitis C.
•Negative HCV RNA = No active HCV infection.
•Positive HCV RNA = Active HCV infection.

http://hepatitis.about.com/od/diagnosis/a/HCVtests.htm
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