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eye concern
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eye concern

I was told yesterday by my eye doc that it is called Pinguela. It is a fleshy growth on the white part of the eye usually near the nose and it invades the cornea. It is not serious. They don't know the exact cause, but it occurs more often in people who spend a great deal of time outdoors especially in sunny climates. Long term exporsure to sunlight.
This is not me...I am definitely an a/c person and not an outdoor person by any means. He claims that this has nothing to do with the meds. But, I can't help but wonder because this has happened practically over night.
Has anyone experienced this ?
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Avatar_n_tn
I tried looking up that spelling of pinguela and all I got was a buncha stuff in Spanish.  I give up.  But if it is what I think it is, we used to surgically remove them, as they can continue to grow and obstruct your eyesite.  But like I said I cant even find a name for that condition, so I dont know if it is the same thing that you have.
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Avatar_n_tn
Yes...that's exactly what I now have. But this has happened practically overnight.
Thank you for looking into this for me. It just doesn't make sense to me that I would get this since I've always avoided the sun. :)
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Avatar_n_tn
I think you are refering to Pinguecula which is a thickening of the white of the eye, often caused by chronic irritation.
From http://www.healthatoz.com/healthatoz/Atoz/ency/pinguecula_and_pterygium.html

Pinguecula and pterygium are both non-malignant, slow-growing proliferations of conjunctival connective tissue in the eye. Pterygia, but not pingueculae, extend over the cornea.

Description

The outer layer of the eyeball consists of the tough white sclera and the transparent cornea. The cornea lies in front of the colored part of the eye (iris). Overlying the sclera is a transparent mucous membrane called the conjunctiva. The conjunctiva lines the inside of the lids (palpebral conjunctiva) and covers the sclera (bulbar conjunctiva).

Pingueculae and pterygia are common in adults, and their incidence increases with age. Pterygia are less common than pingueculae.

Pingueculae are seen as small, raised, thickenings of the conjunctiva. They may be yellow, gray, white, or colorless. They are almost always to one side of the iris--not above or below--and usually on the side closest to the nose. A pinguecula may develop into a pterygium.

Pterygia are conjunctival thickenings that may have blood vessels associated with them. They often have a triangular-shaped appearance. The pterygia may also grow over the cornea and may therefore affect vision.

Causes and symptoms

Causes

The cause or causes of these disorders are unknown, but they are more frequent in people who live in sunny and windy climates and people whose jobs expose them to ultraviolet (UV) light (for example, farmers and arc welders). Pingueculae and pterygia also occur in older people. It is thought these growths are the result of UV or infrared light and irritation. It is also believed that prolonged exposure to these risk factors (that is, UV light) increases the chances of occurrence.

Symptoms

Although some people with pinguecula constantly feel like they have a foreign body in their eye, most are asymptomatic. Because the lids can no longer spread the tears over a smooth area, dry areas may result. Some people with a pterygium are also asymptomatic; some feel like they have a foreign body in their eye. Because a pterygium can stretch and distort the cornea, some people acquire astigmatism from a pterygium.

Diagnosis

An eye doctor (ophthalmologist or optometrist) can usually diagnose pingueculae and pterygia by external observation, generally using an instrument called a slit lamp. A slit lamp is a microscope with a light source and magnifies the structures of the eye for the examiner. However, because pingueculae and pterygia can sometimes look similar to more serious eye growths, it is important for people to have them checked by an eye care professional.

Treatment

Usually, no treatment is needed. Artificial tears can be used to relieve the sensation of a foreign body in the eye and to protect against dryness. Surgery to remove the pinguecula or pterygium is advisable when the effect on the cornea causes visual defects or when the thickening is causing excessive and recurrent discomfort or inflammation. Sometimes surgical removal is also performed for cosmetic reasons. However, healing from this type of surgery, although usually painless, takes many weeks, and there is a high rate of recurrence (as high as 50-60% in some regions). Accordingly, surgery is avoided unless problems due to the pinguecula or pterygium are significant.

Several methods have been used to attempt to reduce the recurrence of the pinguecula or pterygium after surgery. One method that should be abandoned is beta radiation. Although it is effective at slowing the regrowth of pingueculae and pterygia, it can cause cataracts. A preferable method is the topical application of the anticancer drug, mitomycin-C.

Prognosis

Most pingueculae and pterygia grow slowly and almost never cause significant damage, so the prognosis is excellent. Again, a diagnosis must be made to rule out other more serious disorders.

Prevention

There is nothing that has been clearly shown to prevent these disorders, or to prevent a pinguecula from progressing to a pterygium. However, the presence of pingueculae and pterygia have been linked to exposure to UV radiation. For that reason, UV exposure should be reduced. The American Optometric Association (AOA) suggests that sunglasses should block 99-100% of UV-A and UV-B rays. Patients should speak to their eye care professionals about protective coatings on sunglasses or regular spectacles. Protecting the eyes from sunlight, dust, and other environmental irritants is a good idea.

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Avatar_n_tn
Hi martee and everyone!
My daughter was born with what you have.  It is in one eye and to the left of her pupil. (on the white part) The doc said if it grows and cover her pupil it will have to be removed.  She is 20 now and it hasn't grown and is not covering her pupil.  They told me she got it in utero from MY exposure in the sun when I was pregnant with her. (We live in South Florida)
I have met 2 others who were also born with it and they received the same explanation as to how it got there. I don't really think it is anything very serious.  I hope this helps you a little bit.
Hugs
Enigma
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Avatar_n_tn
Thanks for the reply.
I never knew you could be born with it. Most people I know with it developed it over time.
My husband had one removed, and after the surgery he was in a lot of pain...(he usually doesn't complain about anything)
So I will think 2x about removing it. :)
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Avatar_n_tn
just to warn others, ive just had a operation to remove pinguela, sunbeds i think caused me to get this, i had to have op cause it slightly on my pupil, not nice operation, my eyes r sensitive to the sunlight i now will look for protective sunglasses , hope this will warn others that sunbeds r so dangerous, i didnt use them often didnt seem no harm , the consultant i saw said it sunbeds , personally i think it from being an outdoor person i love the sun but always wore sunglasses, its bin two days since my operation, cant say im in pain , but my eye is sore and umbearable twitching, i got it comming on my other eye and the thought of going for onother op terrifies me , so i wiill think twice before exsposure to the sunlight.
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Avatar_m_tn
Eat avocaos...really one of  the best foods for eye problems
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Avatar_f_tn
I have it too. I have it on both eyes and have had for years. Mine is irritating at times, but at present isn't causing any vision problems. I live in Canada, but have always loved to spend time in the sun. I was to by my eye doc that if you have surgery, it usually comes back. So, unless it affects your vision, she suggested not to go for surgery.
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Avatar_n_tn
about 4% will have the ping growing back after surgery, I guess your eye doc dosn´t know what he is talking about...
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