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hep c test results
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hep c test results

1st)HCV Antibody Hep c virus result > 11.0 (high) positive
2nd)Riba results: AST 41iu/l (h) reference range 5-37 iu/l
                          ALT 57 iu/l (h) reference range 5-35 iu/l
                          Alk phos 51 iu/l  reference range 39-117 iu/l
                          bilirubin, total 1.0 mg/dl  reference range 0.2-1.2 mg/dl
                          bilirubin, direct 0.1mg/dl reference range 0.0-0.2 mg/dl
                          protein, total 7.5gm/dl reference range 6.0-8.0gm/dl
                          albumin 4.4gm/dl reference range 3.5-5.5gm/dl
ribosome p AB,IGG    <0.2
reference range: ,1.0 (Negative)
Unit:U
3rd test) HEP C RNA, PCR ULTRASENSITIVE  (RESULTS
        HVC QUANT    3980000
RESULTS IU/ML reference range: undetected
                        unit: iu/ml
result in log IU/ml is 6.60
The quantification range of this assay is 43 IU/ml to 69,000,000 IU/mL (1.63 log Iu/mL to 7.84 log Iu/mL

   The million $$$ question, do I have hep c? 1st test done at health dept, 2-3 test family practioner who said he is unsure on reading the test, next went to Gastroenterologist, ALSO UNSURE ON RESULTS? WANT A  GENO TEST NOW,  never did drugs etc... spouse passed away donated organs, tested positive, advised for testing. uninsured and drs can not read test? where do i go now? can anyone read these tests? i think its a negative
16 Comments Post a Comment
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766573_tn?1365170066
The first result detects presence of Hepatitis C Antibody. That means you were exposed to Hepatitis C. The step after that is to test for the actual presence of the virus in your blood to see if you are infected.

The second test does just that. It appears the virus is detected and your viral load is 3980000 (state in International Units) which is 6.6 when expressed in logarithm format.

Next would be to contact a Gastro or Hepatologist and find out your genotype and perhaps assess what stage of fibrosis you are.
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766573_tn?1365170066
I wonder if they are confused since the word "undetected" is on the result. In this case it refers to the reference interval. If the data were entered correctly with the right spacing it would mean:

HEP C RNA, PCR ULTRASENSITIVE RESULTS
IU/ML 3980000 IU/ml
reference range: undetected  
unit: iu/ml  
result in log is 6.60

The quantification range of this assay is
43 IU/ml to 69,000,000 IU/mL
1.63 log Iu/mL to 7.84 log Iu/mL
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1815939_tn?1377995399
Your HCV RNA test confirms that you do have chronic Hepatitis C. You would not have a viral load if you were negative. The fact that the test can quantify the virons/viral load, indicates that you have chronic Hepatitis C.

HEP C RNA, PCR ULTRASENSITIVE  (RESULTS
        HVC QUANT    3980000

I do not know where you live, but your next step is to find a knowledgeable and experienced Hepatologist. Even if you have to drive a few miles to a larger city, it is worth it to get an experienced and qualified doctor.

When I changed doctors I looked on the internet and tried to find a doctor who was affiliated with a University Hospital and who listed his specialty as liver disease. I read about the group and the experience of the doctor. And then chose. Of course, a referral from a friend may be better, but if you do not know anyone with Hep C, that would be difficult. Also, you can tell us where you live (approximately) and which large city you are near. We may be able to give you some names of Hepatologists. Keep in mind, Hepatologists are generally Gastroenterologists who have special education and training with liver disease, they are Gastroenterologists who specialize in liver disease. So you may have to look under Gastroenterology and then look for a doctor who specializes in liver diseases. However, most University affiliated MDs will be listed under Hepatology.

That doctor will order a Genotype test to see which Genotype you are. He/she may order some other tests also. You may need a liver biopsy to determine your stage of fibrosis. After you know your Genotype you can discuss treatment options.

Many people do not know where they acquired Hepatitis C. It is contracted through blood exposure, so somewhere along the line you were exposed to blood containing Hepatitis C.

Transmission methods could be via:
*Exposure to blood or blood products (blood transfusion, Gamma Globulin, RhoGam, etc.)
*Occupational exposure (needle or sharps stick)
*Hemodialysis
*Dental or surgical proceedures
*Acupuncture
*Nail salons, nail clippers
*Shared tooth brushes or razors
*Rarely sex (both people need cuts)
*Sharing of drug equipment (needles, syringes, spoons, etc.)
*Mother to Baby

40% of people have no idea how they got it. It is not important how you got it. What is important is to find a competent doctor and move forward with appropriate tests and treatment.

Hepatitis C IS curable.

Please visit the forum often. Give us more information so we can better respond. Come here for information and support.

Best of luck.
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766573_tn?1365170066
Wow you found out you may have HCV when your spouse donated organs? You must be shocked and beyond grief. I am truly sorry for you loss and I cannot imagine how you must feel. There is lots of support and knowledge and experience on here so be sure to check back

____________________-

The test in the middle is a liver panel and the second two values (your Alt and Ast) appear slightly higher than the reference intervals indicated in your post.

Here is a link about the Liver Panel
http://labtestsonline.org/understanding/analytes/liver-panel/tab/test
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1840891_tn?1383280315
I'm slow to type and several other members have beat me to it with great advice, but here is my own reply for reinforcement:

Wow, I'm so sorry to hear this - what a string of bad news for you, especially since its very rare for Hepatitis C to pass from one spouse to another unless they are sharing needles. There are lots of other ways to have gotten infected though and it may have been through something you both did. You may have both gotten injections, dental work or tattoos from someone who re-used equipment, or both gotten contaminated gamma globulin shots, or any number of other possibilities. In the end, it doesn't really matter how you got it, what matters is taking care of yourself now. I can imagine a general practitioner not being sure of those lab results, but if your gastroenterologist can't figure them out then you absolutely need to find a different doctor. I'd advise looking for a hepatologist (1st choice) or a gastroenterologist who practices at a large medical facility or hospital. One with a liver transplant facility is ideal. It is unlikely you will ever need one, but these doctors have the highest level of training and experience in treating Hepatitis C.

Hepatitis C is a virus that works its damage quite slowly and also quite silently. Most people have no obvious symptoms until they have reached the point of severe liver damage. You should educate yourself as much as possible as it can really pay off during treatment if you know standard treatment protocol and what to expect. Your new doctors will probably want to order the genotype test, as treatment protocols are different for different genotypes, and they should certainly order an abdominal ultrasound to screen for other problems related to Hepatitis C, and will very likely order either a liver biopsy or one of the less invasive (but somewhat less accurate) alternatives. The biopsy will tell how much the virus has damaged your liver so far, and will help to determine how urgent it is to treat the virus. Current treatments can eliminate the virus in most patients, but can also cause many severe side effects. New treatments currently being studied promise higher success rates with fewer side effects, but won't be generally available for another couple of years. It's good to know if you can safely wait or need to hurry.

You will find this forum to be an excellent place to get answers to your questions, with many very knowledgeable members. Another excellent resource is http://www.hcvadvocate.org (sorry you have to copy and paste that URL to use it). Welcome to the forum!
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Avatar_m_tn
Just got test # 4
                        HCV GENOTYPE 1a
                        reference range: undetected

well did my body cure its self? haven't heard from dr picked up results from lab,,, thanks
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1815939_tn?1377995399
If the Genotype test can determine a Genotype, then you have Hepatitis C.

The reference range is just telling you what it should be.

The Genotype test is telling you the Genotype of the Hepatitis C. The test is telling you that you have Hep C Genotype 1a.

If you did not have Hep C, then the test would not be able to find a Genotype. It the test can determine a Genotype, then you have Hepatitis C.
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1747881_tn?1358189534
"well did my body cure its self?"

Unfortunately no, you have HCV genotype 1a with a viral load of 3980000

Sorry to hear of your diagnosis
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1815939_tn?1377995399
I, too, am sorry to hear you have Hep C. Your next step is to find a competent, knowledgeable, and experienced Hepatologist, preferably one who is affiliated with a large medical center. That doctor will probably order a liver biopsy and probably some other blood tests depending on your situation.

If you let us know which large city you are near, someone may be able to give you the name of an experienced and competent Hepatologist.

Best of luck to you.
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Avatar_m_tn
tHE FIRST TEST: POSITIVE
2ND TEST: NEGATIVE
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766573_tn?1365170066
Yeah, it seems you are letting the term "Reference range" through you off.

Reference ranges are values (or intervals) used to interpret a set of medical test results. Pooh's explanation is a good one. It means the test you took would indicate you are undetected if you actually were.

Sorry this is so confusing. The doctor will go over all this when he explains the results. Typically the next step would be to find out how far you fibrosis has progressed. There are several ways to do this.

It is wise to do this before you jump in and treat. Be sure to ask about this when you talk about treatment options.

Again. I am sorry the results on your test are formatted in a way that makes it appear the result is something other than what it actually is.

Best of luck.
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1815939_tn?1377995399
What was the second test you had run and where does it say it is negative.

You cannot have a viral load and they cannot determine a Genotype unless you actually have Hepatitis C. The fact that they could count a viral load and determine the Genotype means you have Hep C.
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1815939_tn?1377995399
If you are referring to the following test and the negative result to that test (which is negative), then the confusion may lie there:

ribosome p AB,IGG    <0.2
reference range: ,1.0 (Negative)


From Mayo Clinic:

Test ID: RIB
Ribosome P Antibodies, IgG, Serum

Useful For
As an adjunct in the evaluation of patients with lupus erythematosus (LE)

Interpretation
A positive result is consistent with the diagnosis of lupus erythematosus,

Reference Values
or =1.0 U (positive)


So that test had something to do with Lupus, not with HCV.

http://www.mayomedicallaboratories.com/test-catalog/Clinical+and+Interpretive/87837



From Labs on Line: (and you can see that the Riba test for HCV is a HCV RIBA test)

The following tests may be used to screen for and/or detect HCV:

    Anti-HCV test detects the presence of antibodies to the virus, indicating exposure to HCV. This test cannot distinguish between someone with an active or a previous HCV infection. Usually, the test is reported as "positive" or "negative." There is some evidence that if the test is "weakly positive," it may be a false positive. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggests that weakly positive tests be confirmed with the HCV RIBA test before being reported.
    HCV recombinant immunoblot assay (RIBA) test is an additional test ordered to confirm the presence of HCV antibodies. In most cases, it can tell if the positive anti-HCV test was due to exposure to HCV (positive RIBA) or represents a false signal (negative RIBA). In a few cases, the results cannot answer this question (indeterminate RIBA). Like the anti-HCV test, the RIBA test cannot distinguish between a current or past infection.

The following tests may be used to diagnose a current infection and to guide and monitor treatment:

    HCV RNA test, Qualitative may be used to distinguish between a current or past infection. It is reported as a "positive" or "detected" if any HCV viral RNA is found; otherwise, the report will be "negative" or not detected." It may also be ordered after HCV treatment is complete to see if the virus has been eliminated from the blood. These tests are seldom used any more.
    HCV Viral Load (HCV RNA test, Quantitative) detects and measures the number of viral RNA particles in the blood. Viral load tests are often used before and during treatment to help determine response to treatment by comparing the amount of virus before and during treatment (usually at several time points in the first three months of treatment). Successful treatment causes a decrease of 99% or more (2 logs) in viral load soon after starting treatment (as early as 4-12 weeks) and usually leads to viral load being not detected even after treatment is completed. Some newer viral load tests can detect very low amounts of viral RNA.
    Viral genotyping is used to determine the kind, or genotype, of the HCV virus present. There are 6 major types of HCV; the most common (genotype 1) is less likely to respond to treatment than genotypes 2 or 3 and usually requires longer therapy (48 weeks versus 24 weeks for genotype 2 or 3). Genotyping is often ordered before treatment is started to give an idea of the likelihood of success and how long treatment may be needed.

http://labtestsonline.org/understanding/analytes/hepatitis-c/tab/test

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Avatar_m_tn
the 2nd test was the riba
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1815939_tn?1377995399
If the test you are talking about is this test:

ribosome p AB,IGG    <0.2
reference range: ,1.0 (Negative)

Yes, that test is negative, but that test is NOT a test for Hep C. It is a test for Lupus.

I do not see any place that you had a HCV Riba test (the test for Hep C).

I see that you had the HCV antibody test and then the Hep C RNA and then the Genotype. I do not see that you had a HCV Riba test done.



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766573_tn?1365170066
Wow I am really sorry this is happening.
The Gastro or liver specialist might be able to obtain a clean copy that is formatted right. Or perform another PCR.

You can tell by the way the data is presented in your post (by the caps, weird spacing, fragmented parenthesis and trailing data) that the actual report would present the data in a more cohesive manner. Until then I can see how one would inaccurately interpret the results.
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