Hepatitis C Community
hip a,b,c
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This forum is for questions about medical issues and research aspects of Hepatitis C such as, questions about being newly diagnosed, questions about current treatments, information and participation in discussions about research studies and clinical trials related to Hepatitis. If you would like to communicate with other people who have been touched by Hepatitis, please visit our new Hepatitis Social/Living with Hepatitis forum

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hip a,b,c

what is the difference between Hippetitus A,B,C
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Hep C is the one that has no vaccine and is transferred most commonly through blood to blood contact.
HEPATITIS A
Route of transmission: Fecal-oral
Common sources: Poor sanitation, contaminated food and water
Incubation period: 2-6 weeks
Contagious: 2 weeks before symptoms to 1 week after symptoms
Prevention: a 2 dose vaccine is 96% effective
HEPATITIS B
Route of transmission: Blood and bodily fluids
Common sources: Sharing needles with IV drug use, blood contaminated injuries (needlestick), mother to baby at delivery, unprotected sexual contact (especially anal intercourse)
Incubation period: 6 weeks to 6 months
Contagious: As long as test positive usually <3 months, but may be lifetime
Severity: <1% die from acute hepatitis, but chronic hepatitis occurs in 1-2% adults & 90% infant with 25-40% becoming carriers with increased risk of cirrhosis or liver cancer
Prevention: a 3 dose vaccine is 97% effective
HEPATITIS C
Route of transmission: Blood and bodily fluids
Common sources: 50% from IV drug use now, prior to 1991 was from blood transfusions, now only 1 in 200,000 transfusions, blood contaminated injuries, mother to baby at delivery, tattooing (sharing of needles)
Incubation period: 6 weeks to 6 months
Contagious: 15% - <3 months, 85% - lifetime
Severity: 50+% develop chronic hepatitis, with 30% of these developing cirrhosis or liver cancer, 40% of all liver disease in US, 51% of liver transplants, might be most common cause of primary liver cancer in US.
Prevention: No vaccine, avoid sharing razors and toothbrushes, cover wounds with dressings, self clean-up of blood spills
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What is hepatitis?

“Hepatitis” means inflammation of the liver. Toxins, certain drugs, some diseases, heavy alcohol use, and bacterial and viral infections can all cause hepatitis. Hepatitis is also the name of a family of viral infections that affect the liver; the most common types are Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C.

What is the difference between Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C?

Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C are diseases caused by three different viruses. Although each can cause similar symptoms, they have different modes of transmission and can affect the liver differently. Hepatitis A appears only as an acute or newly occurring infection and does not become chronic. People with Hepatitis A usually improve without treatment. Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C can also begin as acute infections, but in some people, the virus remains in the body, resulting in chronic disease and long-term liver problems. There are vaccines to prevent Hepatitis A and B; however, there is not one for Hepatitis C. If a person has had one type of viral hepatitis in the past, it is still possible to get the other types.

http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/C/cFAQ.htm
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Hep C is the one that has no vaccine and is transferred most commonly through blood to blood contact.
HEPATITIS A
Route of transmission: Fecal-oral
Common sources: Poor sanitation, contaminated food and water
Incubation period: 2-6 weeks
Contagious: 2 weeks before symptoms to 1 week after symptoms
Prevention: a 2 dose vaccine is 96% effective
HEPATITIS B
Route of transmission: Blood and bodily fluids
Common sources: Sharing needles with IV drug use, blood contaminated injuries (needlestick), mother to baby at delivery, unprotected sexual contact (especially anal intercourse)
Incubation period: 6 weeks to 6 months
Contagious: As long as test positive usually <3 months, but may be lifetime
Severity: <1% die from acute hepatitis, but chronic hepatitis occurs in 1-2% adults & 90% infant with 25-40% becoming carriers with increased risk of cirrhosis or liver cancer
Prevention: a 3 dose vaccine is 97% effective
HEPATITIS C
Route of transmission: Blood and bodily fluids
Common sources: 50% from IV drug use now, prior to 1991 was from blood transfusions, now only 1 in 200,000 transfusions, blood contaminated injuries, mother to baby at delivery, tattooing (sharing of needles)
Incubation period: 6 weeks to 6 months
Contagious: 15% - <3 months, 85% - lifetime
Severity: 50+% develop chronic hepatitis, with 30% of these developing cirrhosis or liver cancer, 40% of all liver disease in US, 51% of liver transplants, might be most common cause of primary liver cancer in US.
Prevention: No vaccine, avoid sharing razors and toothbrushes, cover wounds with dressings, self clean-up of blood spills
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