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please review and help
I had a panel of tests done to test for hepatitis A,B and C after 14 weeks post exposure to a woman of unknown status. the tests were done by LabCorp and were as follows:

HBsAG screen: Negative

Hep A Ab, IgM: Negative

Hep B Core Ab, IgM: Negative

Hep C Virus Ab: <0.1

I have been reading about when these tests would be considered conclusive and seems to be a lot of debate as to a conclusive window period. Some say 12 weeks is conclusive, some say 6 months and some say 9 months. Like I said my tests were done at 14 weeks post exposure or exactly 102 days. Are my tests conclusive or do I need further testing?
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683231 tn?1467326617
There are no medical professionals here only patients.

I suggest you ask your doctor for the most informed answer.

As far as time for hep c antibodies to form if you are immuno compromised for example in the presence of an existing HIV infection  it can take up to six months for anti-bodies to develop.  However if you are not immunocompromised it should only take 12 weeks for anti-bodies to hepatitis C to develop.

Just to add hep c is a blood borne virus requiring hep c blood to enter your blood stream. While sexual transmission is  theoretically possible it is a greater risk for those with multiple partners, or those who engage in rough sexual practices or in the presence of HIV.

For other types of hepatitis I suggest you ask in the related community.

But my first suggest remains for a medical diagnosis speak to a medical professional.

Also in the future, I suggest when having relations with anyone you take standard precautions to avoid infection by using barrier protection i.e. condoms to avoid having such concerns in the future.
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My exposure was French kissing and unprotected insertive oral. I also had a full blood test done and all my liver tests came back normal. I will always use protection now after this time of stress and anxiety. My question now is if my blood tests show normal and my doctor says I am a healthy person then should my body produce the needed amount of antibodies at 14 weeks to show up on a test if I was indeed infected?
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683231 tn?1467326617
The activities you described are not risk factors for hepatitis C. Hep c requires blood to blood contact for transmission.

Hepatitis c antibodies should normally develop to detectable levels within 12 weeks for those who do not have compromised immune systems

For hep A this is from ingesting fecal matter the transmission route is oral. I expect you would also develop antibodies in that time and likely notable symptoms.

For hep B try the  Hep B community forum.

Or your best option is to speak to a medical expert like your personal physician as no one here is a medical professional. No one here is in the medical field we are a community of patients.

This is primarily a support group for those living with the effects of hep c infection, its treatment and the after effects of decades of infection. We cannot diagnose anyone or offer medical advice. Only our own personal experiences of living with hep c.

For medical advice and expert answers speak with your doctor.
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my s/co was <0.1 at 14 weeks, my question is does this number tend to rise until interpreted as positive or does it just jump up at a certain point? im sorry if my questions are bothering but I am really worried. I know you are not a doctor but from what ive read most doctors aren't very educated in hepatitis so any patient who has this disease would be a trustworthy source in my opinion. do you think that I should re test at 6 months to be sure I am truly negative? also I read your profile.... CONGRATS on beating this disease and being able to win this battle!!!
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You have nothing to worry about. If it is really bothering you, ask your doctor for a viral load test (HCV/RNA). That test looks for virus, not antibodies and is reliable at 3 weeks post exposure.
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683231 tn?1467326617
With a result as you have posted more than 12 weeks post exposed is conclusive you do not have hep c.

If as suggested you feel you need to be retested that is up to you but it won't change your results you do not have hep c I my lay persons opinion
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683231 tn?1467326617
With a result as you have posted more than 12 weeks post exposed is conclusive you do not have hep c.

If as suggested you feel you need to be retested that is up to you but it won't change your results you do not have hep c I my lay persons opinion
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