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plez help
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plez help

Need to find out what #'s mean from Blood anals the abbreviations etc can anyone help my; sweetie has been diagnosd w/Hep c and we are just starting the journey I would really like to be able to understand the jargon so that I can help as much as possible.I hate not understanding what a # on a piece of paper means and I hate to admit it but I truly do not trust Drs. The bottom line is my sweetie is young and so am I and I want to know as much as possible for informed decisions.Thanx for the time and any info anyone can help me with.
                                

                          Thanx  islagirl
23 Comments Post a Comment
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we would need to see the numbers and abbreviations in order to give you any useful info.

oh, sorry, where are my manners?  Welcome to the Forum - and I believe you will find answers here.  There are so many knowledgeable (and ecperienced) people here, willing to share info.

Please remember these are not doctors, etc, just other hepc people who have learned so much and, as I said aboce, are willing to share.  Pat
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Someone has posted where you can get a listing what blood tests before.
I meant to write it down. Maybe they will see this email and repost the info.
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Check out this site and see if it helps.

http://labtestsonline.org/understanding/
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1747881_tn?1358189534

AFP: Alpha-FetoProtein
ALP: Alkaline Phosphatase (Alk Phos)
ALT/SGPT: Alanine Aminotransferase - liver function blood test
AST/SGOT: Aspartate Aminotransferase - liver function blood test
CBC: Complete Blood Count
DAA: Direct Acting Anti-viral
ELISA: Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay
EPO: Erythropoietin Epoetin alfa (Epogen/Procrit), Darbepoetin alfa (Aranesp)
ESA:: Erythropoiesis Stimulating Agent
ESLD: End-Stage Liver Disease
GGT:: Gamma Glutamyl Transpeptidase
HCC: HepatoCellular Carcinoma (Liver Cancer)
HDL: High Density Lipoproteins (Good Cholesterol)
HGB: Hemoglobin
IFN: Interferon (Alpha 2a/2b)
IU: International Unit 1 IU (2.5 VL Copies apx)
LDL: Low Density Lipoproteins (Bad Cholesterol)
LFT: Liver Function Test
LLN: Lower Limit of Normal
NAFLD: Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (Steatosis)
NASH: Non Alcoholic SteatoHepatitis
Neup: Neupogen
PEG: PolyEthylene Glycol
PegIFN: Pegylated Interferon Alpha (2a/2b)
PI : Protease Inhibitor
RBC: Red Blood Cell Count
RIBA: Recombinant ImmunoBlot Assay
TMA: Transcription Mediated Amplification
TSH: Thyroid stimulating hormone or Thyrotropin
ULN: Upper Limit of Normal
VLDL: Very Low Density Lipoproteins
WBC: White Blood Cell Count

Follow the link for more

http://www.medhelp.org/health_pages/Hepatitis/Hepatitis-C-Acronyms-Abbreviations/show/3?cid=64
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Thanks guys....

do you know what these two mean....have just started showing up on my last two lab tests:

CRCL (CG)    and     GFR (MDRD)

?
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I am going by some blood work I had done many yeas ago and am wondering about things that were flagged AST ( SGOT ) 51  ,ALT  ( SGPT ) 72 and what  is bilirubin ? Kinda found out what hemoglobin and hematocrit mean since I quit smoking they may have dropped  I will get new tests done next time I can get to one of those free things they do every year.The blood work my husband had done the report says; hepatitis c antibody; flag A; result reactive then under that it says signal to cut off; flag H 27.40.None of this do I understand   Thanx For your Time.

                islagirl
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683231_tn?1415953923
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003479.htm

What is Bilirubin:

Bilirubin is a yellowish pigment found in bile, a fluid made by the liver. A small amount of older red blood cells are replaced by new blood cells every day. Bilirubin is left after these older blood cells are removed. The liver helps break down bilirubin so that it can be removed from the body in the stool.

Why the Test is Performed

Large amounts of bilirubin in the blood can lead to jaundice. Jaundice is a yellow color in the skin, mucus membranes, or eyes.

Normal Results

It is normal to have some bilirubin in your blood. Normal levels are:

    Direct (also called conjugated) bilirubin: 0 to 0.3 mg/dL
    Total bilirubin: 0.3 to 1.9 mg/dL

Note: mg/dL = milligrams per deciliter

Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results.

The examples above show the common results for these tests. Some laboratories use different measurements or may test different samples.

What Abnormal Results Mean

In newborns, bilirubin levels are higher for the first few days of life. Your child's doctor must consider the following when deciding whether your baby's bilirubin levels are too high:

    How fast the level has been rising
    Whether the baby was born early
    How old the baby is

Jaundice can also occur when more red blood cells than normal are broken down. This can be caused by:

    Erythroblastosis fetalis
    Hemolytic anemia
    Transfusion reaction

The following liver problems may also cause jaundice or high bilirubin levels:

    Cirrhosis (scarring of the liver)
    Hepatitis
    Liver disease
    Gilbert's disease

The following problems with gallbladder or bile ducts may cause higher bilirubin levels:

    Biliary stricture
    Cancer of the pancreas or gallbladder
    Gallstones

Alternative Names

Total bilirubin - blood; Unconjugated bilirubin - blood; Indirect bilirubin - blood; Conjugated bilirubin - blood; Direct bilirubin - blood


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683231_tn?1415953923
Blood tests from "years ago" only describe what was going on with you at that time but here are some range values:

The normal range of values for AST (SGOT) is about 5 to 40 units per liter of serum (the liquid part of the blood). The normal range of values for ALT (SGPT) is about 7 to 56 units per liter of serum.

So yes your old results are very slightly elevated.

Your husbands result means his blood has hepatitis c antibodies.

Hepatitis C Antibody Test
Results

Reactive or Positive Hepatitis C Antibody Test

• A reactive or positive antibody test means that
Hepatitis C antibodies were found in the blood
and a person has been infected with the
Hepatitis C virus at some point in time.

• Once people have been infected, they will always
have antibodies in their blood. This is true if even
if they have cleared the Hepatitis C virus.

• A reactive antibody test does not necessarily
mean that you have Hepatitis C. A person will
need an additional, follow-up test.

Diagnosing Hepatitis C

If the antibody test is reactive, an additional blood
test is needed to determine if a person is currently
infected with Hepatitis C. This test is called a RNA test.
Another name used for this test is a PCR test. If the
RNA test is negative, this means a person does not
have Hepatitis C. If the RNA test is positive, this means
a person currently has Hepatitis C and should talk to
a doctor experienced in diagnosing and treating the
disease.

Hope this helps
Lynn
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I will try to help. Starting round 3 of treatment after being cleared at week 4 with triple therapy with incivik. I'm doing the triple therapy with sovaldi this time. I worked at my GI doctors office so if you have any questions I will do my best to help.
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I:  Wow, while I was finding my 'Mosby's Manual of Diagnostic and Laboratory Tests' flyinlynn gave you a really comprehensive answer.

Two things, and Lynn covered them, but I wanted to repeat...
  1.  You (both) need current Labs to know what is going on now.
  2.  Ranges vary greatly from Lab to Lab, BUT THEIR TESTS  FIT WITHIN THEIR RANGES, i.e., If a person is normal in Lab's range they will be normal in Lab B or C's ranges.

Also, just a simple recap, AST (SGOT) and ALT (SGPT) are what is called Liver Function tests, also referred to as LFTs.  Bilirubin is also used to evaluate liver function so falls in the LFTs.

And , to stress again, the manual quoted different ranges from what my Lab uses and those are different from what Lynn's uses, BUT each range will show 'Normals' as 'Normal' and high or low as that proportionately.

Having said that, there is only a very slim chance that you have become infected from your sweetie, but a test can ease your mind.

Also, what you are doing, getting informed, being supportive, being understanding is the best gift you can give him.  

Hang in there, and never hesitate to ask any questions you have.  This is a great site to get answers and support.  

Welcome to our world - one we are all supporting each other through and working to leave behind in the near future.  Good luck to your sweetie on treatment. Pat
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I:  Forgot to stress that your huaband needs the more specific tests, as antibodys do not mean infected, again as Lynn said.    Pat
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H:  I looked up your two Labs in Mosby's Manual, also.

  CrCl stands for Creatine Clearance which is used to measure GFR of the kidney.  GFR is the number of mililiters of filtrate made by the kidneys PER MINUTE.

Not sure what I am telling you, except that this is a measure of kidney function.  Might be wise to ask your Dr to 'translate this into English' so you get the correct info on how that works and why.

Hope this helps!!  Pat
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Hi Heart

My new doctor had been testing eGFR aka ESTIMATED GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE. I guess it has something to do with kidney function one of the other things we need to keep an eye on if we have cirrhosis as that can affect kidneys as well.

The ref range from my lab is >59 mL/min and then there is this note added to the test result:

Note: Persistent reduction over 3 months in eGFR =60 mL/min/1.73 m2 may also
have CKD if evidence of persistent proteinuria. Additional information
may be found at www.kdoqi.org.

I found CRCL it is Also known as: Creatinine Clearance, Urine; CRCL; CCT

here is a link:

http://labtestsonline.org/understanding/analytes/creatinine-clearance/tab/test/

looks like another kidney test

Good Luck
Lynn


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Thank you .... I will email him...
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Hi Pat

Looks like you were on top of that one lol. I just google and try to seperate good info from other than good. I have found many sites that are generally reliable I dont have any books on medical stuff like the Mobsy's you have. I am actually a machinist who knows way more than I want about hep c and liver stuff.

Have a good one Pat!

Lynn
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Just as an FYI there is Zero wiggle room for GFR when it comes to the reference interval ( >59) Staging for CKD (Chronic Kidney Disease) starts right away (after the three consistent labs/months). After that everything goes by your GFR.
http://www.medhelp.org/user_photos/show/499301

I know since I was at stage 2 during treatment and am now at stage 3. I just kept hoping my renal values would rebound the way all the other values did after treatment. :0
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That book is one I got several years ago when I could not even spell internet - much less search it!  : -).  have learned more about finding info on the internet since using this Forum than in all my years of computer use, thanks to you and others like you, guiding me (us) through!

That said, you find great sites and information - and probably more up-to-date than my books.  Also, your machinist experience, training and mind set guide you to be very spedific and in order - something that is great when explaining stuff to someone who doesn't understand or have a background!!!

Just trying to say 'thanks for all the help' and never hesitate  to jump in w/info.  The more of us who explain, the better chance of someone getting the info they need.  

Thanks, you have a great day, too.  Pat
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Thanks I don't know much about this subject a am hoping I newer have to learn like I have about cirrhosis and hep C. My new doctor just startes testing me for eGFR and my result is a little concerning to me altho I am still in normal range. Not liking the trend I am seeing here:

8/2/13    84.29     RANGE >59
1/6/14    72.96
3/14/14   66.58

My doctor has not made any comment on this. I guess I wall ask at my next appointment in January. I will have a test done before my appointment I am sure.

What does this mean? Where should I be looking? Do I have something else going on now? I have been taking Spironolactone (diuretic) 50 mg for about 6 years is this having an effect?

Thanks
Lynn
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Avatar_m_tn
we are working on more tests for him and I am gonna look to get new blood anals for me
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thanx very informative will start lookin to get new blood tests for me and moe info for my sweetie
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new app  in sept thats the closest we can get
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Well, another thing this dragon teaches (or tries to force us to learn), is patience.  'Hurry up and wait' - for appts, for results, for treatments, for treatment completion....you get the picture.  Sounds like he should be early enough in the disease to have the time it takes to wait ...and do it right.

One other encouraging thing is that by the time y'all get through the testing, etc, the new meds should either be available or will be shortly.  That is a good thing.  What will be available by Fall/Winter is soooo much better than
the 1st (just INF injections 3 x wk), 2nd (INF inj +  Riba pill), and 3rd/4th (what most of us are on now) generations of treatments.  I am not putting down ANY of these treatments.  They have, any and all, cured people---just that each has gotten better at it, with a higher success rate and less side effects and these new ones are supposed to be close to 100% success rate, withthe fewest sides.

Y'all hang in there and keep us informed - and never hesitate to ask questions here, or just come for support, because you can be sure we all understand what you'rs going through!  : -).  Pat
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INF shot Riba pill combo is not new.
Did that combo back in the late 90's.
Did not work.
Interferon is a *****. And having to give yourself 3 shot a week is awful.
I know. Was on it.  Non-responder. Too many people have had reactions to this combo. I went on to 3 other combos that all contained interferon.

As they are going forward they are developing drugs that do not include interferon. I have done every drug combination since '95.  I am fortunate that my original doctor is now doing HCV drug research.  I am now doing Sovaldi and Riba.  

Sovaldi separates the blood cell from the blood stem containing the HVC cells.  This allows the Riba to start attack free floating blood cells. Sovaldi is a smart drug...Riba is stupid...to Riba all blood cells look the same, that is why you have to do blood tests to check you platelets regularly.

The next new wonder drug coming down the pike that should be available end of Dec or Jan is a one pill a day wonder.  No shots.  No interferon.

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