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reticulocyte count hemoglobinin/hematocrit test results
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reticulocyte count hemoglobinin/hematocrit test results

can anyone spell out the meaning of these test results
reticulocyte, absolute  105420  H    REF RANGE  20000-80000CELL/UL
HEMOGLOBIN  15.8  H  REF RANGE 11.7-15
HEMATOCRIT  45.4  H   REF RANGE  35.0-45.0  
Thanks  his 3707
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233616_tn?1312790796
The Test
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  How is it used?
When is it ordered?
What does the test result mean?
Is there anything else I should know?


How is it used?
The reticulocyte count is used to help determine if the bone marrow is responding adequately to the body’s need for red blood cells (RBCs) and to help determine the cause of and classify different types of anemia. The number of reticulocytes must be compared to the number of RBCs to calculate a percentage of reticulocytes; so the test is ordered along with a RBC count. A hemoglobin and/or hematocrit are usually ordered in order to evaluate the severity of anemia.
The RBC, hemoglobin, and hematocrit are frequently ordered as part of a complete blood count (CBC). The CBC usually includes an evaluation of RBC characteristics, such as cell size, volume, and shape. Based on these results, a reticulocyte count may be ordered to further examine the RBCs. Reticulocytes can be distinguished from mature RBCs because they still contain remnant genetic material (RNA), a characteristic not found in mature RBCs. Circulating reticulocytes generally lose their RNA within one to two days, thus becoming mature RBCs.



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When is it ordered?
A reticulocyte count may be ordered when you have a decreased RBC count and/or a decreased hemoglobin and hematocrit and your doctor wants to evaluate bone marrow function. If you have no apparent symptoms, these findings may be found during routine blood work. Testing may also be ordered when you have symptoms such as paleness, fatigue, weakness, shortness of breath, and/or blood in the stool.
When you have a known iron or vitamin B12 or folate deficiency, known kidney disease, known bone marrow suppression – such as that due to chemotherapy or bone marrow transplant - and/or are receiving erythropoietin, the reticulocyte count may be ordered along with a RBC count, hematocrit, and hemoglobin at intervals recommended by your doctor to monitor marrow function and response to treatment.

When you have an increased number of RBCs and elevated hemoglobin and hematocrit, the reticulocyte count may be ordered to help determine the degree and rate of overproduction of RBCs.



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What does the test result mean?
NOTE: This test has no single number that identifies an abnormal result. Your lab report (see a sample report) should include a range of numbers (reference range) that identifies what is expected for you based on your age, sex, and the method used in that laboratory. You can find more information about expected results at Reference Ranges and What They Mean. Lab Tests Online strongly recommends that you discuss the meaning of your test results with your doctor.


What your doctor is looking for is an appropriate response from the bone marrow, to confirm that your bone marrow is reacting as it should to an increased demand for RBC production.
In a healthy patient, the reticulocyte percentage is essentially stable. When the number of RBCs and hematocrit decreases, the percentage of reticulocytes may appear increased compared to the overall number of RBCs. In order to get a more accurate assessment of bone marrow function, the calculated reticulocyte percentage (%) is often corrected with a calculation called a corrected reticulocyte count or a reticulocyte index (RI). This calculation compares the patient’s hematocrit with a normal hematocrit value. An additional calculation called the reticulocyte production index (RPI) is sometimes calculated to correct for the degree of reticulocyte immaturity – reflecting how quickly the reticulocytes were released from the bone marrow and how long it will take them to mature in the bloodstream. The RPI and maturation time vary with the hematocrit.

Reticulocyte (%) = [Number of Reticulocytes / Number of Red Blood Cells] X 100

Reticulocyte Index = Reticulocyte count (%) X [Measured hematocrit / Normal hematocrit]

Reticulocyte Production Index = (Reticulocyte Index) X (1/maturation time)

Some automated reticulocyte counts may have an immature reticulocyte fraction (IRF) and a mean reticulocyte volume (MRV) reported. They are primarily research parameters at this time. The reticulocyte count is a reflection of recent bone marrow activity. If your bone marrow is responding appropriately to the demand for increased numbers of RBCs, then the bone marrow will allow for the early release of more immature RBCs, increasing the number of reticulocytes in the blood.

An increased reticulocyte percentage may indicate conditions such as:

for much more info go to labtestsonline.org
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254544_tn?1310779332
my favorite web site for getting help interpreting labs is

labtestsonline.org

It's easy to use and easy to understand.  I have spent hours at a time reading there.

Mouse
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789911_tn?1368640383
merrybe, are you sure your not a doctor?  wow,  you know a lot!  my mother died from leukemia so when bone marrow is mentioned I get a little tingly.  I have an appointment tomorrow and will go over what you have said so when they reexplain I will know what they are talking about.  They didnt seemed concerned or even mention these off reference range results.   and florida mouse I will go to that website.  Thanks for all your information    his3707
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Avatar_f_tn
Merrybe did not write that, she copied and pasted. She is not a doctor. The hemoglobin is a test for anemia. You obviously are not anemic. Hematocrit is a blood test that measures the percentage of red blood cells  in whole blood. The slightly high numbers do not mean anything. You may have been a bit dehydrated.
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