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Coffee?
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Coffee?

Like many on this site I gave up coffee and caffeine as soon as I was diagnosed.
I have read many places that it was hard on the liver.

But recently I have been finding differing view points re: coffee.

http://www.liversupport.com/wordpress/2006/06/coffees-liver-benefits/

I know this is a pretty old study, but I sure could use a cup of joe!

Does anyone know the real skinny  on coffee/hcv/liver health?

Please site studies if possible as opposed to your experience.

ps - cocksparrow, I left  you a message on nomads.

thank you!
bandman
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Ohfuji S, Fukushima W, Tanaka T, Habu D, Tamori A, Sakaguchi H, Takeda T, Kawada N, Seki S, Nishiguchi S, Shiomi S, Hirota Y.

Hepatol Res. 2006 Nov;36(3):201-8. Epub 2006 Aug 17.
    Coffee consumption and reduced risk of hepatocellular carcinoma among patients with chronic type C liver disease: A case-control study.
Department of Public Health, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3, Asahi-machi, Abeno-ku, Osaka, 545-8585, Japan.

Several studies have reported the role of coffee for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, no study investigated about the relation of coffee for HCC among individuals with a relevant risk factor, i.e., hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Thus, we conducted a hospital-based case-control study to assess an association between coffee and HCC, in which both 73 cases and 253 controls were patients with chronic type C liver disease. To consider potential changes in coffee intake due to progression of liver disease, the effect of coffee was estimated separately before and after first identification of liver disease. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for HCC risk were calculated using the conditional logistic regression model. Coffee drinking on a daily basis (>/=1cup/day) revealed lowered ORs as compared with non-drinkers both before first identification of liver disease (OR 0.38; 95% CI: 0.13-1.12; P=0.078) as well as thereafter (OR 0.19; 95% CI: 0.05-0.71; P=0.032). Even after excluding subjects who reported a reduction in the frequency of coffee intake after first identification of liver disease, this negative correlation persisted (OR 0.35; 95% CI: 0.12-1.06; P=0.063). Taken together, coffee may be a protective factor for HCC among those infected with HCV.


Med Hypotheses. 2008 Aug 11. [Epub ahead of print]Click here to read Links
    The multifaceted mechanisms for coffee's anti-tumorigenic effect on liver.
    Tao KS, Wang W, Wang L, Cao DY, Li YQ, Wu SX, Dou KF.

    Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, No. 15 West Chang'le Road, 710032 Xi'an, PR China.

    Epidemiological studies have found an inverse association between coffee consumption and the risk of liver cancer. Animal data support such a chemopreventive effect of coffee. Substantial research has been devoted to the identification of coffee components that may be responsible for these beneficial effects. Based on the current available literature, three major components, i.e. coffee diterpenes cafestol and kahweol (C+K), caffeine and chlorogenic acid contribute to the beneficial effects. These components induce phase II detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes as well as inhibit the expression or decrease the activity of phase I activating enzymes thus prevent carcinogenesis. These components target different stages of a common pathway, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) - NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) - antioxidant-responsive-element (ARE) signal pathway thus alter the ARE-dependent expression of genes needed in the anti-tumorigenic effects.
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I know many Hep C patients who still drink their coffee.  I, personally, gave it up.  I would, however, suggest to anyone who does want to enjoy their coffee to at least start buying organic coffee.  There are a lot of unnecessary chemicals in regular coffee (or so I've heard).
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I still drink a cup or two a day, I read a french study it helped with fibrous,  But there are so many different views,  I like it and doubt one cup a day or even two is a horrible thing.

My opinion my choice
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179856_tn?1333550962
I drank coffee and ate chocolate and drank soda (has caffeine too you know) all through treatment and beat geno1A and 1B.

Drink the coffee - my God treatment is hard enough and the studies I read do say it is good for you in fact and can help prevent liver cancer.

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I drank coffee whenever the taste didn't make me gag.  Sometimes it just tasted wrong.  Just my experience, though.  I'm not gonna cite studies because I don't care about studies but you can always do research yourself.
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479244_tn?1271567259
thanks all,

I have been looking but I could only find the study I cited.

I am thinking of taking it back up... need the energy!

bandman
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In my humble opinion, it can't be any worse on the liver than tx drugs.  Unfortunately, we can't do our tx drugs in moderation, but we can with everything else.
Trin
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179856_tn?1333550962
Put the word coffee into the search box on this site - I just posted a ton of links about a week or two ago and they will come right up.,
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AASLD 2008: AASLD 2008:

High Coffee Consumption May Slow Hepatitis C Progression

Authors and Disclosures
Laurie Bouck
Disclosure: Laurie Bouck has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Laurie Barclay, MD
Disclosure: Laurie Barclay, MD, has disclosed no relevant financial relationships.

Brande Nicole Martin
Disclosure: Brande Nicole Martin has disclosed no relevant financial information.


From The Liver Meeting 2008: 59th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD)

November 6, 2008 (San Francisco, California) — Increased coffee consumption may slow the progression of liver damage caused by hepatitis C virus infection, researchers reported in a poster here at The Liver Meeting 2008: 59th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD). Patients who self-reported drinking 3 or more cups of coffee per day were less likely to have liver disease progression than those who drank less coffee daily.

"In population studies, coffee intake has been inversely associated with cirrhosis, chronic liver disease, and hepatocellular carcinoma. But, no studies have examined the relationship between coffee consumption and progression of advanced liver disease," wrote Neal D. Freedman, MD, of the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, in Rockville, Maryland, and colleagues.

To study this relationship, Freedman analyzed patient questionnaire data about food frequency, including coffee and tea consumption, from the 3.5-year HALT-C randomized trial of 1050 hepatitis C patients at Ishak stage 3 or higher who were unresponsive to standard drug therapies. Some patients in the HALT-C trial received no treatment, and others received 90 µg/week of pegylated interferon alfa-2a.

Of the 808 patients who responded to the questionnaire at baseline, 711 drank zero to 2 cups of coffee a day, and 97 drank 3 or more cups of coffee daily. Those who drank the most coffee also consumed the most alcohol and cigarettes. These coffee drinkers, however, had healthier livers than the other participants, with less steatosis (evaluated by biopsy) and lower bilirubin levels, α-fetoprotein levels, and aspartate aminotransferase/alanine aminotransferase ratios (P < .05).

Liver disease had progressed in 208 patients at the 13-month follow-up, but outcome rates decreased from 10.4/100 person-years (no coffee daily) to 6.0/100 person-years (3 or more cups of coffee daily; P = 0.002). The hazard ratio for coffee consumption ranged from 1.21 (0.81 - 1.79) for no coffee daily to 0.53 (0.29 - 0.95) for 3 or more cups daily (95% confidence intervals; P = .0005). The results show that "coffee consumption may slow the progression of fibrotic liver disease," Freedman wrote in the abstract.

"This is an observational study," Freedman told Medscape Gastroenterology, "so it may be that coffee is a marker for some other activity," he said. "It may be that people who are feeling sicker don't drink as much coffee." He looked at tea drinkers as well but did not find an association between tea consumption and liver disease, he said.

The questionnaire did not ask about the strength of the coffee, what people put in their coffee, or whether people drank caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee, Freedman said. About 85% of coffee consumed nationally is caffeinated. Freedman said that hypotheses about what part of coffee is beneficial to the liver are "pretty speculative" although "maybe the best data is for caffeine." Of the 1000-plus compounds in coffee, several of them may be influencing liver disease, he said.

One advantage of the study was its focus on "the natural history of clinically significant disease progression, which other studies have not been able to do," said Freedman's colleague James Everhart, MD, of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, in Bethesda, Maryland. The study also benefited from a homogenous population. "They all started off with liver disease, so we knew they had liver disease and were able to then look at progression of liver disease from that point on," he told Medscape Gastroenterology.

Actual coffee consumption can be difficult to measure. Samir Rouabhia, MD, from the Butler University Hospital Center's Internal Medicine Department in Algeria, said that people tend to drink coffee unevenly. "One day you take one cup and one day you take three cups," he told Medscape Gastroenterology, which makes it difficult to measure coffee's effect on the liver. He also pointed out that it's unclear how the coffee was prepared and how strong it was.

Drs. Freedman, Everhart, and Rouabhia have disclosed no relevant financial relationships. The study received no commercial support.

The Liver Meeting 2008: 59th Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases: Abstract 1778. Presented November 4, 2008
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96938_tn?1189803458
For those who want to enjoy coffee but lost the taste for it..

http://www.ineedcoffee.com/01/enema/
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206807_tn?1331939784
That would be a tough one to explain during a coffee break at work. But the looks on their faces would be worth it.
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476246_tn?1310999221
lol
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577132_tn?1314270126
Tx without coffee would be unbearable for me!  However, I only drink it in the morning as I find I really can't sleep at night if I have it after about 1000.  It's hard enough getting to sleep as it is!

Mmmmm, I love coffee!!!!
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For a different reason to abstain from caffeine, I thought it was a diuretic, and would therefore cause one to lose hydration which is so critical to keeping the sides at bay.

Nygirl: I drink it once in awhile too, along with caffeinated, sugary, high-fructose-corn-syrupy, colas.  Some days it helps me to keep up with the TOBSTER.  :-)
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276730_tn?1327966546
I must have coffee in the morning. The first 5 months of tx I could not drink it at all. Tasted like dirt.

Now I can drink it again.
Also sweets, couldnt touch that either all I wanted was pasta and potato salad.
Strange!

Charm27
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479244_tn?1271567259
thanks nygirl7 and mikesimon,

I forgot about coffee dehydrating you,
but I am no longer tx'ing.

Very interesting stuff you guys are posting.

I am thinking coffee off tx (to slow liver damage) and very little coffee on tx.

thanks all,
bandman
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362971_tn?1201990634
   Coffee does not dehydrate you. It would take many many cups of coffee for this to take place. I have seen this on TV a lot lately. Especially from nutritionists. 1 or 2 or even 3 cups a day are fine.
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Thanks!  I stand corrected.  It does seem to make me tinkle more though, NOT something that needs to be increased at this point!   :-)
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I drink at least one cup of organic coffee a day...but on weekend morning ill have few extra cups....im pretty sure its ok...ya proberly dont want to drinl 25 cups of expresso tho
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Opinions are fine, but when one has the science, well, that is where I'll plop down my buck( for a hot cup of joe or two, or three!!) In other words, what mikesimon says. jerry
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479244_tn?1271567259
organic coffee??

is starbucks organic?

bandman
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559277_tn?1330622339
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I make my own...i also use organic milk and sugar with a touch of stevia and distilled water.
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Want a drug that could lower your risk of diabetes, Parkinson's disease, and colon cancer? That could lift your mood and treat headaches? That could lower your risk of cavities?

If it sounds too good to be true, think again.

Coffee, the much maligned but undoubtedly beloved beverage, just made headlines for possibly cutting the risk of the latest disease epidemic, type 2 diabetes. And the real news seems to be that the more you drink, the better.


http://men.webmd.com/features/coffee-new-health-food





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Coffee is loaded with antioxidants, including a group of compounds called quinines  
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Your risk of developing liver cancer is reduced by 43% with ever two cups of coffee you drink.
http://www.coffeedetective.com/developing-liver-cancer.html


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338734_tn?1377163768
Take that with one lump or two?
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374652_tn?1311302831
Coffee = good
dark choc = good
veges, grapefruit, destress,,, all good..
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619345_tn?1310345021
I read the post Mikesimon posted and it is the info I came across a few days ago
in all my reading from the recent Hep symposium in SF after jimjim posted
I have always been a coffee drinker and like it strong I have had Hep C for 45 years with very little progression for that length of time now I am attibuting my very slow progression to drinking coffee who woulda thought?  3 cups expresso strength daily and now I do not have to feel guilty and can even have a cup in the afternoon  GREAT   and YES Dark Sugarless Swiss Chocolate
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495402_tn?1220621003
Coffee is my one vice and I must have a cup of Dunkin Donuts coffee on my way to work every morning.  Someone above hit the nail on the head with "treatment would be unbearable without a cup of coffee" and I totally agree.

Linda
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