1523804_tn?1316564509
mosquitos
Any one ever come across any information regarding HepC being spread by mosquitoes?
Already billed as the deadliest creature on the planet, responsible for more deaths than any other, I wondered if HepC was part of their  arsenal. On the surface it seems highly probable as mossies go from blood to blood with no sterilization in between.
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1669790_tn?1333666195
Since HVC is spread by contact with infected blood, people often worry that mosquitoes could be flying syringes. The mosquitoe's mouthparts, the proboscis, is actually a complex structure that has separate channels. When a mosquito bites, it injects saliva through one tube and ***** the blood in a completely separate tube  So, it's very unlikely for infected blood to be spread to another person.  The same question often comes up with AIDs.  

The reason mosquitoes can transmit other diseases like dengue, yellow fever, malaria, west nile virus, etc., is there is an amplification in the mosquitoes gut.  When a mosquito bites the next victim, they pass the amplified virus while injecting the saliva to thin the blood some.  Most viruses including HVC won't survive in the mosquitoes gut, due to ph and other things.

And only females bite,  Go figure. lol
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1669790_tn?1333666195
oh, it edited the word - s*cks
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1669790_tn?1333666195
mossies? you from australia?
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Avatar_universal
Mosquitoes do not transmit HCV because they have separate and distinct systems, just as we do.

The skeeter saliva is what transmits viral encephalitis, dengue, malaria etc. Apparently the blood only comes out of us; and is not returned to the next victim.  That's the word from science and i would imagine that in some places there are so many mosquitoes....that is science was wrong about this, there would be ample proof.

willy
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1669790_tn?1333666195
I think the only possiblity, although highly unlikely might be the following scenario.  A female takes a bloodmeal from a HCV infected human, flies off and lands on another uninfected human.  That person squashes the fully engorged female and the blood is pushed into an open bleeding wound.  Possible, but highly unlikely.
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Avatar_universal
                Mosquitoes land on me but never bite!   I always figured that somehow the hep c repels them.    Probably all the drugs I've been on.  We'll see this year since I'm SVR....
                                                                                      -Libby
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1523804_tn?1316564509
Finally some good news. Thanks for the info. We are having Biblical amounts of them at the moment. Despite all repellents, nets and biochemical weapons, a few always complete the mission.

I'm from UK but did a couple of years in Oz in my youth.

Not that it really matters, but If only the females bite, what do the males live on? Are they vegetarian?
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Avatar_universal
By the way...on this subject i read that people w/ HCv or advanced liver issues should be careful with DEET; it's hard on the liver.

willy
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1523804_tn?1316564509
Good tip Willy, thanks. I've never seen Deet in India, but regulations and  restrictions are a lot  more  casual than in the Western world so there's no telling what might be in the indigenous brews. I think I'll give them  all  a wide berth,
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1669790_tn?1333666195
Male mosquitoes and females for that matter feed on plant nectars as a carb source.  The female needs the protein from the blood (human, bird, reptile, etc.) to lay a batch of eggs to continue the cycle - egg, larva, pupa, adult.  She can lay several batches during her lifespan of about 2-3 weeks.

Rather than lathering up in deet, you can spray so on a scarf or the brim of you hat to keep it off your skin.  There are also formulations that are much less concentrated, rather than using the strongest %.  Also, some alternatives are repellants with the active ingredients, picaridin and oil of eucalyptus that work almost as well as deet.

Most mosquito species biting activity is highest around dusk and dawn, so avoid outside activity at those times, cover up with long sleeves if its not too hot.   Empty all containers around your yard that could be accumulating rainfall, since you are likely producing your own if you have buckets, tires, etc.  

Hope that helps.
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1523804_tn?1316564509

So it's the old "female / propagate the species syndrome",(so eloquently described by Kipling in The female of the species), that once again wreaks havoc upon the unwary.

Thanks for the suggestions. You got the dawn and dusk bit right. We have clouds of the demons as the sun goes down. Knowing the hungry ones are all females intent on reproducing has definitely raised the fear factor a notch.
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446474_tn?1446351282
Unfortunately, I would think that us human beings are the deadliest creatures on earth...
"responsible for more deaths than any other" Not only other human beings but all other species and the environment too.

From the "Centers for Disease Control and Prevention" CDC
http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/C/cFAQ.htm#cFAQ33
Hepatitis C Information for the Public

"Can a person get Hepatitis C from a mosquito or other insect bite?
Hepatitis C virus has not been shown to be transmitted by mosquitoes or other insects."

Best-
Hector
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1523804_tn?1316564509
I stand corrected. As always, you are right.
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1669790_tn?1333666195
Mosquitoes received the distinction of being the "deadliest animals on the planet" due to their involvement in the transmission of malaria.  Malaria still remains a major killer in Africa (91%), with over 2 million deaths/yr and other countries like India, Pakistan, etc.

As far as humans being the biggest killers?  Not sure of your point.  Humans killing humans or other animals?  Do you kill termites, ants and other pests that might be infesting your house or ruining your lawn?  

http://www.rollbackmalaria.org/keyfacts.html
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