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HSV-1 and 2... possibilities... part four Questions
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HSV-1 and 2... possibilities... part four Questions

The question then is, will the body, at the site of the attempted infection, still behave as though the virus is there?

Will the skin show the same bumps, the itch, the redness or the burn sensations...of an initial infection, while the antibodies that my body has already created to prevent re-infection of HSV-1 and HSV-2 continue to fight off the new intruders?

If re-infection is highly unlikely, then my antibodies will win the fight... and the intruding HSV-1 or HSV-2 virus will be destroyed by the antibodies before they have a chance to take hold and remain as a secondary infection site in the genitals.

Does this scenario generally hold true?

Would HSV-1 and HSV-2, if contracted orally, and allowing proper time frame for seropositive conversion, prevent genital reinfection of HSV-1 and/or HSV-2?

Would I be able to know if a person that I had unprotected contact with was a carrier of HSV-1 or HSV-2 from the initial 2 to 4 day infection that I would go through, even though I would not become infected genitally due to being seropositive to both HSV-1 and HSV-2 Orally?

(part 5 to follow)
2 Comments Post a Comment
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Avatar_m_tn
No, you will not get symptoms of a reinfection because that doesn't happen. You cannot be infected with the same virus twice regardless of it being HSV or not.

1). The only time you are prone (minimally prone) is during the first outbreak where you touch a herpes lesion and then touch another part of your body. This is extremely rare and to pass it to another part of your body during an outbreak you'd probably have to scratch the heck out of an oral herpes lesion then scratch the particles on your finger into the tissue with force. To answer your first question, yes, the antibodies would destroy the virus. A person's body who is already infected recognizes the virus and the body basically says "NO, you can't enter." The body is well equipped with antibodies to destroy reinfection. It rarely happens if at all. If a person with oral HSV-1 has sex with a person with genital HSV-1, they are not going to be reinfected in most, if not all scenarios. People become immune to the virus after it has time to establish antibodies. Generally, the body gets used to the virus within a few months, which is why we see breakouts get less frequent with time.

2). Once you get the virus your body immediately develops antibodies to prevent getting the same virus in other locations as well as to suppress it. You would not be able to recognize that a sexual partner has HSV-1 or HSV-2 unless they had symptoms you could see with your eyes. Since your body already has antibodies to HSV-1 and HSV-2, you wouldn't get a reinfection or symptoms related to a reinfection.
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Avatar_m_tn
No, you will not get symptoms of a reinfection because that doesn't happen. You cannot be infected with the same virus twice regardless of it being HSV or not.

1). The only time you are prone (minimally prone) is during the first outbreak where you touch a herpes lesion and then touch another part of your body. This is extremely rare and to pass it to another part of your body during an outbreak you'd probably have to scratch the heck out of an oral herpes lesion then scratch the particles on your finger into the tissue with force. To answer your first question, yes, the antibodies would destroy the virus. A person's body who is already infected recognizes the virus and the body basically says "NO, you can't enter." The body is well equipped with antibodies to destroy reinfection. It rarely happens if at all. If a person with oral HSV-1 has sex with a person with genital HSV-1, they are not going to be reinfected in most, if not all scenarios. People become immune to the virus after it has time to establish antibodies. Generally, the body gets used to the virus within a few months, which is why we see breakouts get less frequent with time.

2). Once you get the virus your body immediately develops antibodies to prevent getting the same virus in other locations as well as to suppress it. You would not be able to recognize that a sexual partner has HSV-1 or HSV-2 unless they had symptoms you could see with your eyes. Since your body already has antibodies to HSV-1 and HSV-2, you wouldn't get a reinfection or symptoms related to a reinfection.
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