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Hello... I'm taking two B/P a day, what are some ways to control your B/P?
#nineExternal User
I have been taking B/P for over two years now, I tried to stop taking them, but once I did , my B/P went back up
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20216050 tn?1492672803
High blood pressure is a very easily controlled issue - once you understand the cause. Understanding the cause is somewhat difficult for most people because they've been led to believe that medication is the answer. But the reason you take medication is because you take the medication.

I'll explain: After oxygen, water is the most important substance the body needs to live (salt is next). Adults lose around ½ gallon of water per day through respiration, kidney function, perspiration and waste removal - but few replace this water properly. The medical profession supports "drinking plenty of fluids", but there is no substitution for water. These other "fluids" have a diuretic effect to force water out of the body - this is in addition to the water they're not replacing.

Dehydration triggers a hormone called histamine. Histamine is a neurotransmitter in charge of water regulation. Simply stated, it monitors the body's hydration levels. When you don't drink enough water, it sends a signal to the brain that a drought condition exists, and the brain then gives you a recognizable symptom - in your case, high blood pressure.

The way prescribed medication work is, they block the signals from histamine from reaching the brain. This fools the brain into thinking that the problem has been resolved, and so it shuts off the symptom.

But the medication eventually wears off, and when it does, the signal produced by histamine is once again able to reach the brain, prompting the activation of another set of symptoms.

Because the initial cause is a chronic water deficiency, increasing the water intake will resolve the problem.

The medical profession's theory is that too much salt holds too much water in the cardiovascular system, which pushes against the walls of the vessels with too much pressure.

This is incorrect, and the very medications they use to treat it contradict their theory. For instance, ACE inhibitors are prescribed to relax or open the arteries so blood can flow through easier - if there's so much water in the vessels that they've expanded to a dangerous level of pressure, the arteries are already stretched open. Calcium channel blockers also work to open the vessels.

Salt is not the culprit. The reason the body accumulates extra salt is because salt retains water - and when you're dehydrated, the extra salt is held onto to try and attract the water that you're not drinking. Thus, excess salt is a sign that you're not drinking enough water.

But that's rather moot at this point, because the vessels don't expand with water - they lose water.

When you get dehydrated, 66% of the lost water volume is from the area outside the cells - a water/salt mix. 26% of the lost water volume is from inside of the cells - fresh water. And the other 8% of lost water volume is from the blood.

This 8% water loss from the blood thickens the blood and causes the vessels to tighten up to compensate for the water loss. This increases the workload on the heart which then has to increase the blood pressure to provide an efficient supply of blood to the entire body.

There is another part to this action that should be considered to fully understand how it works. this part takes place in and out of the cells.

There are two oceans of water in the body: a salt/water mix located outside the cells and a fresh water ocean inside the cells. Proper health requires that these two oceans remain in a critical balance.

As stated above, when you get dehydrated, these two oceans are knocked off balance, and the body tries to make a correction.

To do this, it uses the process of reverse osmosis to counteract the natural osmotic tendency of the cells to share their water with the rest of the body. Reverse osmosis works by filtering salt water under pressure through millions of microscopic holes that allow just the fresh water to come through. The cells have a kind of one-way valve for this.

The increase in pressure required for this comes from the raised blood pressure.

While this may seem like quite an efficient system (and it is), it can't be maintained. Relying on this system doesn't correct the water deficiency that causes it in the first place. Allowing the water deficiency to worsen raises the blood pressure.

Because medications block the signals produced by histamines, they are actually anti-histamines (you nay have heard this term associated with cold and allergy remedies. It's the same thing and it works the same way).

Medications do nothing but manage the problem. Over the period of time that you take medications, you're supporting the drug companies that profit from the sick care system.

Sorry this is so long, but understanding what high blood pressure is all about takes a little explaining. The medical profession would probably prefer is said simply, "go see a doctor" and not wasted so much of your time.
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So many ways beginning with diet and BG monitors....As a prediabetic, I am in my fourth week in a trial for a local physician-non invasive transdermal CO2?  I work out regularly which includes cardio and some resistance training ,  but I am looking for ways to recover faster so I can continue my workouts and control my diet ...after speaking to this physician's  triathlete wife/ I thought I'd give it a go...
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