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Yeast Infection in Dog?
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Yeast Infection in Dog?

Is it possible for a female dog to get a yeast infection?  She has been licking herself more than usual and I noticed she left a brownish discharge after sitting on a blanket.  She doesn't whine or seem uncomfortable and is just as active as usual.  Is there a homeopathic remedy that I can give her?  BTW, she is spayed.
Type of Animal
:  
Dog
Age of Animal
:  
3
Sex of Animal
:  
Female
Breed of Animal
:  
jack russel/lab mix
Last date your pet was examined by a vet?
:  
October 17, 2009
City
:  
Montclair
State/Province
:  
VA
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234713_tn?1283530259
Yes, it is possible for dog's to develop yeast infections especially in moist anatomical locations such as in ears, lip folds, facial folds, vulva, perianal area and more.  The yeast is most commonly  malassezia rather than candida.

The infection that your dog may have sounds to be one of the following:  an urinary tract infection, vaginal infection, or an infection of the skin of the perivulvar area.  The infection could be bacterial, yeast,  or a combination.  Usually urinary tract infections are accompanied by the symptoms of increased frequency of urination, and/or drinking, dribbling, or inappropriate urination.  However, occasionally the only symptom is licking the vulvar area.  It would be best to have your dog examined by a vet of course, but at least bring a fresh urine sample to your vet for urinalysis to help differentiate between a urinary tract infection and vaginal infection.  If the urinalysis comes back negative than it is most likely a vaginal infection.  A culture and sensitivity of the vaginal secretions and surrounding skin  may be necessary to determine if the infection is bacterial or fungal (yeast).  

The brownish discharge you have described is most likely porphyrin staining.  Porphyrin is the red pigment in the blood and saliva of the dog.  Your dog’s constant licking is probably staining the skin and bedding a reddish brown.

Antifungal shampoo, such as Nizoral 2% shampoo, which is available over the counter  can be used to eliminate a yeast infection.  Clean the area with the shampoo, and leave the shampoo on for a 10 minute contact time,  than rinse thoroughly.  This can be repeated twice weekly.  Dilute tea tree oil can also be used topically for yeast and bacterial skin infections.  However, your dog will probably lick it off unless you  have an Elizabethan collar. If the problem is a urinary tract infection cranberry capsules  given orally and forcing your dog to drink more may help, but antibiotics are usually necessary.  The Chinese herbal formula: Eight Righteous may help.

It these measures are not effective your dog may require prescription antibiotics or antifungal medications depending on the type of infection.
3 Comments
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Avatar_n_tn
Thank you so much for all of the information.  I am not sure how to get a urine sample . . . .I will make a vet appt. for her.
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234713_tn?1283530259
It is not difficult to collect urine from your dog.  When she squats to urinate place a clean shallow container below where the urine is exiting.  Only a small amount is needed, just an ounce or so.  A clean shallow frying pan, aluminum pie plate, or plastic food take out container all work well.  Than simply funnel the urine into a clean container, or if using a plastic food take out container, just place the lid back on.  Than bring to your vet.  The most diagnostic sample is the first morning's urine.  The sample should be kept at at room  temperature and should be brought to the vet within 4 hours .
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