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Precancerous Cells
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Precancerous Cells

I got a Leep procedure done today b/c I had precancerous cells show up on my colposcopy.  My doctor said that she took out all of the lesions.  She said I had to come back in six months to get a pap done unless something shows up on these test results.  What else could show up on the tests if they've already found precancerous cells?  And since I have precancerous cells, does that mean that I'm at a higher risk of getting cancer from this even tho my doctor says I'm only CIN1?  Since she said she took out all of the lesions, does this mean that I am HPV clear?
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I am surprised your doctor performed a LEEP for CIN1 - most will wait 6 months to see if you body is able to clear the dysplasia on it's own. 90% of women are able to reverse it within 1 year without having surgical intervention.
Your doctor won't know for sure if she was able to get all of the abnormal cells until the pathology report comes back from your LEEP procedure - which I assume is what she meant when she said if something else shows up on your results. The report will have a more accurate diagnosis than the colposcopy did, it will likely confirm the CIN1 diagnosis or it's possible it could show areas of CIN2 or 3 even but most times whatever the colposcopy results were will be the same as the LEEP. Also, she of course will try to obtain all the abnormal cells within the LEEP but sometimes the margins are not clear - leaving some dysplasia behind. If that is the the case (and the report still indicates CIN1) she might wait and re-test in 6 months to see if you body was able to clear the remaining dysplasia'. If in 6 months time it hasn't cleared or if has progressed to CIN2 or CIN3 she might perform another LEEP or possibly a cone biopsy. In my opinion, unless the dysplasia has progressed to either moderate (CIN2) or severe (CIN3), it should only be monitored and not excised. The more surgeries done to the cervix the higher the possibility of future pregnancy complications.
CIN1, itself does not put you at higher risk for developing cancer, but having HPV does; since it is the causitive factor for 99.8% of all cervical cancers. Only about 1% of CIN1 will actually go on to cause invasive cervical cancer if not watched and treated prior. Having a LEEP does not rid you of HPV so you will need to be vigilant about contining with regular paps in case the HPV becomes active again causing future dysplasia.
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Avatar_f_tn
So, since I'm at CIN1 my chances of getting cancer are 1%, but does the fact that they found precancerous cells up my chances of getting cancer?  Also,  you said if the HPV becomes active again.  Does that mean I will always have HPV even if it clears away on its own?  Is this something that I'm gonna have to deal with the rest of my life?  It going away and coming back?
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Avatar_f_tn
There is conflicting research as to whether HPV can be cleared and "cured" forever. Some researchers believe that once the infection have been cleared you no longer have HPV, however there is also research that indicates the exact opposite, that HPV is a DNA virus and can alternately go from being active and dormant. I personally, strongly, believe that HPV is a life long virus. The reason being, not simply because of research but because of common sense through experiences in womens health. As I mentioned, HPV is the causitive factor for 99.8% of all cervical cancers and dysplasias. The digiene test is the only FDA approved HPV test and it can only detect if there is an active HPV infection and if so whether the strain is of high risk category or low risk. Many women in my womens health groups have contracted HPV, been treated for dysplasia (precancerous cells), been cleared on all of their follow up paps and colposcopies, only later test positive for HPV and develop dysplasia again even though there has been absolutely no new exposure. I consider women who have dysplasia (and obviously HPV) need to treat it as a chronic condition because it can and does become active after a period of dormancy. Ask any women who has gone through it. Even so, HPV is extremely common. 80% of people will have an active infection by the time they are 50, most will never have any idea they have it because for the majority of the population it will not cause any ill effects.
CIN1 is the precancerous cells that they found in your cervix, CIN1, CIN2 and CIN3 are all levels of dysplasia (otherwise known as precancerous cells). CIN1 is considered to be mild and most often is left and watched to allow your body a chance to clear it on it's own. Low risk HPV (wart causing) can even cause a CIN1 dysplasia which is one of the reasons why most doctors will not surgically treat a mild dysplasia because there are several different causitive factors for it so unless it is caused by HR-HPV (and even then) your body could possibly clear it on it's own. 50% of CIN2 (moderate dysplasia) will progress to CIN3 (severe dysplasia), HPV is the causitive factors for these dysplasias and the higher the level of dysplasia the less likely a person can clear it without medical intervention. Since you already had the LEEP procedure most likely this has rid you of any dysplasia (precancerous cells) you have. For 95% of women, the LEEP is curative and might never have another issue with it but for a some women, they might need additional treatments. So, I wouldn't say because they found CIN1 that you are more likely to develop cancer (most likely the have rid you of all the dysplasia) but because you have HPV you have a higher risk but even that risk is still very low. Are you currently testing positive for HPV? The longer an infection is active the more likely dysplasia will develop or progress. If so, the best thing you can do for yourself is to keep a healthy immune system to fight of the HPV infection. That involves, exercise, low stress, healthy eating with lots of cruciferous vegetables (like kale, bok choy, etc) no smoking. Also, using condoms as well as stopping the use of tampons during and active infection can help to keep the environment in the vagina healthier to help fight it off. Even once you are cleared of any dysplasia, you will need to keep up with regular paps because there is a possibility of developing dysplasia again. Women who have needed to have a hysterectomy because of carcinoma in situ or early invasive cancerous still need to keep up with regular check ups because HPV can cause precancerous/cancerous cells in the vagina (VaIN) and the vulva (VIN).
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Avatar_f_tn
Thank you so much for explaining all that to me, but you have now made me think of something that I haven't really had to think about before.  I'm not dating anyone right now and I'm not sexually active right now so I haven't really thought about having to tell future sex partners.  I was under the impression that this would all go away and I wasn't planning on being sexually active again until it all cleared.  Now if this is all true that this is something I will have to deal with the rest of my life, should I be informing future sex partners even if my paps are coming up clean?  Everything I've been reading leads me to believe that guys only are effected by the low risk HPV unless I am mistaken on this.
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Avatar_f_tn
I guess it really depends on which research you believe. I personally believe that no one is truly 'cured' of HPV just because of personal experience but by no means am I an expert. I have heard many women ask this question and I don't know what the best answer is. In my humble opinion, I would think that would be up to you - but certainly, I don't feel it is necessary to disclose anything to anyone prior to the relationship developing to that level of intimacy and trust. You are correct that generally HPV doesn't cause any ill effects in men, unless it is a low risk category and even then only a few of them might develop warts which is only a cosmetic concern. Most men (and women) will never have any idea they have it because usually there are no ill effects and since condoms are only effective 70% of the time chances are he may (or may not) have been previously exposed to one or more strains of HPV and to that end you yourself may be exposing yourself to a new strain of the virus that you do not already have because of his past history.
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Avatar_n_tn
im trying to understand n comprehend wat yall sayin but im only 17 n  the cancer stuff is new to me im so scared but wat did the doctor tell u wen ur pap came bac abnormall mines just told me they found abnormal cells and i did research to find out what she really ment to say to me but she was to scared to tell me in fear i may cry again
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Avatar_n_tn
im only 15 years old and i have been diagnosed with HPV CIN1 what should i do my doctor hasn't even said any thing about taking out any lesions yet and im so scared ill end up with cancer before im 17 help me someone please
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Avatar_n_tn
im only 15 years old and i have been diagnosed with HPV CIN1 what should i do my doctor hasn't even said any thing about taking out any lesions yet and im so scared ill end up with cancer before im 17 help me someone please
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Get a second opinion from a highly recommended G.Y.N.  Until then dont panic, due to the fact, stress will bring on other illnesses.  I'm 50 years old and just two days ago I found out I  had this.  I am one that is totally against clinics!  They are too overwelmed and make many mistakes due to neglegence and case load.  So get yourself a good G.Y.N and insist he or she answers all your questions.  As you think of concerns right them down on paper so you will remember everything you want answers for to ease your mind.  Make sure you pic a good doctor because I was told this is a virus that you don't ignore, and you should have a yearly test to make sure they catch it when it comes out of dormatory or progresses to a more serious lever.  Just another reason to use condoms.  There's so many other deadly sexually transmitted diseases out there; do yourself a favor and do some research on sexually transmitted deseases.
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