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Where To Get The Vaccine
I am in a relationship with a 44 year old woman. I have hpv (genital warts) and she doesn't. We haven't slept together because neither one of us wants her to be infected. She would like to get the Gardasil vaccine but we can't find a doctor to give it to her because of her age. I don't care what the costs are. I am willing to pay. Does anyone know where I can find a doctor willing to give her the series of shots? Thanks.  -H
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541093 tn?1224674496
Well, the vaccination is not approved or proved to benefit for the female beyond the age of 26... You should talk to your doctor who can guide you...  On the other hand, the low risk hpv strains those cause visible genital warts are not those cause cervical or any other cancers... they are just benign... it's more of a cosmatic concern in a monogamous relationship... Why don't you get rid of those warts talking to your dermatologist... Later, if you don't get any recurrance in 6 months, you should assume your self clear and non-contagious... Further, almost all the hpv infections tend to shed over a few years...
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Thanks for the response. I realize it's not a health problem but if she can avoid getting them with a simple vaccine that would be the way to go. Mine do recur and I know if we have sex she will get them as well. I don't mind waiting the 6 months for the 3 shots but just can't find anyone to give it to her. From what I've read the vaccine is effective for women up to 45 but just has not been approved yet. There's got to be a doctor out there who is sympathic to my cause and I'm sure I'm not the only one in this situation. I'd love to hear from others. Thanks  -H
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It's also important to note that the vaccine does not protect against all strains of the HPV virus. It only protects against 4 of them, 2 of which are for high risk and 2 of which are for the low risk (warts) category. These 4, of course, are the ones that are responsbile for the majority of either cervical cancer or warts but there are several different strains of genital HPV. The strain(s) you have causing the visible warts might not be one of the strains guarded against by the virus. Also, it's possible your partner may already have the same strain(s) of HPV you have but just never developed any symptoms from it. A woman will only test positive for HPV if there is an active infection at the time of testing. If the virus is dormant when the HPV test is run then it will not be detected.
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Yes, I agree to all you are saying but there is a possibilty that this vaccine will stop her from getting warts. There's a lot of variables but if there's a chance that this vaccine will work than I've got to give it a try. Without it she will definitely get it once we have sex. That I know for a fact! I managed to find an ob/gyn in NY that will do it for us. It's expensive but like I said if there's a chance she doesn't have to get these things I'll spend whatever it takes.
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I am 29 and am getting it at Planned Parenthood. You have to pay out of pocket (about 160) for each shot.
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llylly is the only one to actually answer the question you asked. Her advice is sound. You should actually be able to receive the female vaccination (there is no approved male vaccination) from a doctor and have it covered by insurance. If you don't have insurance, Planned Parenthood is the best option.
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