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My 16 month old does not stand at all or walk.
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My 16 month old does not stand at all or walk.

Skye was still in the hospital when they told me she had low muscle tone.  An MRI was done as well at our stay and it read hypoplasia of the corpus callosum.  Now that she is 16 mos old doctors feel she is ready to undergo another MRI in the middle of this Aug to determine the gross motor delay.  She goes around using her own army crawl method, she sits alone, and recently started getting from laying down position to sitting up all by herself.  She is in physical, occupational, and massage therapy.  My main question to you is - - - -  - - - - - - - - - - - -  She does not stand or walk... could she maybe never walk?  Is there an age a child can reach where they just in all honestly, will not walk?
Thank you.
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Hello,
   It is hard to answer your question about what will happen in the future, and even the best of our imaging technology may not be able to make a prediction about what your daughter will or will not achieve as she develops. For anyone reading along, this little girl's condition is a fairly rare one where the fibers that connect the two hemispheres of the brain (known as the Corpus Callosum) do not fully form. Sometimes this is related to genetic disorders, though not always. Hypotonia refers to low muscle tone, in which children have weaker muscles. Low muscle tone makes it difficult to meet motor milestones such as walking, talking, and sitting up. Its a great sign for her cognitive development that she is crawling, sitting and sitting up--these motor milestones are important for giving her brain important sensory input it needs to develop.

   The good news is some individuals with hypoplasia of the corpus callosum are only mildly impacted or even asymptomatic, so it is hard to say to what extent this will have an impact on her life. The important thing is to make sure you are getting careful monitoring and adequate services (physical and occupational therapies, speech language therapy etc). I would suggest meeting regularly with a developmental pediatrician as well as having regular assessments from a pediatric neuropsychologist to determine how she is progressing as compared to same aged peers and to learn more about her unique trajectory of development.

Best Wishes
Rebecca Resnik
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