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Cirrhosis question
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Cirrhosis question

My mom died on November 2 2010 from cirrhosis and renal failure. She entered the hospital on Sept 18, 2010 with a urinary tract infection. My mom did not drink alcohol and had no previous signs of cirrhosis, and they did not diagnose the cirrhosis until 11 days before her death. After a week in the hospital they sent her to rehab. They gave her resperdal in rehab and she exhibited signs of parkinson's disease.She began to deline rapidly and after two weeks in rehab they admitted her to the ICU. She was put on a ventilator and feeding tube. She had sepsis, elevated white blood cell count, temp of 101 and elevated ammonia levels. After ten days of tests, including various cat scans, biopsy,  and other tests, they diagnosed my mom with compensated cirrhosis. On October 31 they said she was experiencing renal failure. They suggested pallitive care that night. She was taken off life support on November 1 and passed away the next day. She was 69.

My mome saw her doctor every three months and I am still shocked that her cirrhosis was undetected. Is this unusual?

Thank you
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419309_tn?1326506891
My condolences to you for the loss of your mother.  Unfortunately, it is not at all unusual for cirrhosis to be present in some individuals without any symptoms at all until late stages.  Although alcohol-induced cirrhosis is the most common cause of cirrhosis in the US, cirrhosis can occur due a number of different factors, such as (but not limited to) chronic viral hepatitis or a genetic condition.

Cirrhosis can be asymptomatic, with no signs of yellowing jaundice, or swelling, or discomfort, and it can remain so for years.  The unfortunate thing is that decompensation of the liver (loss of liver function) can be slow and progressive, or it come very quickly, as it seemed to for your mother.  It is not at all unusual for people suffering from cirrhosis and liver damage to also have associated renal dysfunction and kidney failure.  Also, some of the complications of end-stage liver disease are similar to what you describe: infection, elevated ammonia levels, and parkinson-like symptoms are not uncommon with someone declining from hepato-renal syndrome.  Hope that helps with some of your questions.
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It seems like if she had shown signs (yellowing of eyes, skin, etc) then that would have thrown up a red flag but if she had nothing and complained of nothing to the doctors, I don't see how they would be able to correctly diagnose that.  Sounds like another case of someone going to a hospital to get one problem fixed and end up passing away due to bacteria and germs, etc., in a hospital.  My condolences to you and your family.
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419309_tn?1326506891
My condolences to you for the loss of your mother.  Unfortunately, it is not at all unusual for cirrhosis to be present in some individuals without any symptoms at all until late stages.  Although alcohol-induced cirrhosis is the most common cause of cirrhosis in the US, cirrhosis can occur due a number of different factors, such as (but not limited to) chronic viral hepatitis or a genetic condition.

Cirrhosis can be asymptomatic, with no signs of yellowing jaundice, or swelling, or discomfort, and it can remain so for years.  The unfortunate thing is that decompensation of the liver (loss of liver function) can be slow and progressive, or it come very quickly, as it seemed to for your mother.  It is not at all unusual for people suffering from cirrhosis and liver damage to also have associated renal dysfunction and kidney failure.  Also, some of the complications of end-stage liver disease are similar to what you describe: infection, elevated ammonia levels, and parkinson-like symptoms are not uncommon with someone declining from hepato-renal syndrome.  Hope that helps with some of your questions.
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Avatar_n_tn
Thanks for the posts. On the positive side I'm glad she didn't suffer for a long period .
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