Liver Disorders Community
Hemochromatosis or Chronic Hep B or in my Head?
About This Community:

This support community is for discussions and support relating to liver disorders.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank Blank

Hemochromatosis or Chronic Hep B or in my Head?

Hi,

I had a liver panel done a year ago. I just recently had another series of tests done (different doctor) and I am confused.

Please help me decipher these values;

Tests done on 08/29/2009
ALP-97
ALT-110
AST-103
Bilirubin Total-0.8
Hep B Core Antibody Total-Positive
Hep B Surface Antibody-Positive
Hep B Surface Antigen-Negative
Hep C Antobody-Negative
A1C-6.6

Tests done on 09/28/2010
ALP-102
ALT-139
AST-165
Bilirubin Total-0.7
Hep B Core Antibody Total- Not Repeated
Hep B Surface Antibody- Not Repeated
Hep B Surface Antigen- Not Repeated
Hep C Antibody-Not Repeated
A1C-7.4

My values for the AST and ALT are increasing. I know that I do not have an active Hep B infection, but my enzymes seem to indicate liver damage (I think that I am interpretting it right).I think that I am not contagious. My kids are all vaccinated, my husband was not. He just finished his last of the three shots he needed so now I am guessing he is not protected.

My platlets, WBC and RBS are on the higher end of the normal range. I am type 2 diabetic,

My big worry is that the Hep B infection that happened in the past, damaged my liver. My bigger worry is that my enzymes are increasing. Is there intervention that needs to be done? I am worried that I may have too much iron in my blood causing my values to go up.

Please let me know what your thoughts are. Should I be worring about Hemochromadosis or Chronic Hep B?

Help :-)
Blank
446474_tn?1385271190
You doctor should be the one who explains the test results to you. Diagnosing what may be causing abnormal test results is only guess work. We are not doctors and we don't know your medical history.
Many things can cause ALT and AST levels to rise. Drinking, drugs, etc. You should see a gastroenterologist or a hepatologist to diagnose any problems with your liver.

Here is some info that may be helpful as far as information.

"Hep B Surface Antigen-Negative"
You do NOT have chronic Hep B. You are NOT contagious.
This tests for the presence of virus. A "positive" or "reactive" HBsAg test result means that the person is infected with the hepatitis B virus, which can be an "acute" or a "chronic" infection. Infected people can pass the virus on to others through their blood and infected bodily fluids.

"Hep B Surface Antibody-Positive"
A "positive" or "reactive"  test result indicates that you have successfully responded to the hepatitis B vaccine or has recovered from an acute hepatitis B infection.  This result means that you are immune to future hepatitis B infection and you are not contagious.

Hemochromatosis - there is a DNA test to find out if you have a disease.
Usually a ferritin blood test is done first. If the level is high then the hemochronatosis test is performed.
Hereditary hemochromatosis is one of the most common genetic disorders in the United States. It most often affects Caucasians of Northern European descent, although other ethnic groups are also affected. About five people out of 1,000—0.5 percent—of the U.S. Caucasian population carry two copies of the hemochromatosis gene and are susceptible to developing the disease. One out of every 8 to 12 people is a carrier of one abnormal gene. Hemochromatosis is less common in African Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, and American Indians.
Although both men and women can inherit the gene defect, men are more likely than women to be diagnosed with hereditary hemochromatosis at a younger age. On average, men develop symptoms and are diagnosed between 30 to 50 years of age. For women, the average age of diagnosis is about 50.

Best of luck.
Hectorsf
Related Discussions
2 Comments Post a Comment
Blank
446474_tn?1385271190
You doctor should be the one who explains the test results to you. Diagnosing what may be causing abnormal test results is only guess work. We are not doctors and we don't know your medical history.
Many things can cause ALT and AST levels to rise. Drinking, drugs, etc. You should see a gastroenterologist or a hepatologist to diagnose any problems with your liver.

Here is some info that may be helpful as far as information.

"Hep B Surface Antigen-Negative"
You do NOT have chronic Hep B. You are NOT contagious.
This tests for the presence of virus. A "positive" or "reactive" HBsAg test result means that the person is infected with the hepatitis B virus, which can be an "acute" or a "chronic" infection. Infected people can pass the virus on to others through their blood and infected bodily fluids.

"Hep B Surface Antibody-Positive"
A "positive" or "reactive"  test result indicates that you have successfully responded to the hepatitis B vaccine or has recovered from an acute hepatitis B infection.  This result means that you are immune to future hepatitis B infection and you are not contagious.

Hemochromatosis - there is a DNA test to find out if you have a disease.
Usually a ferritin blood test is done first. If the level is high then the hemochronatosis test is performed.
Hereditary hemochromatosis is one of the most common genetic disorders in the United States. It most often affects Caucasians of Northern European descent, although other ethnic groups are also affected. About five people out of 1,000—0.5 percent—of the U.S. Caucasian population carry two copies of the hemochromatosis gene and are susceptible to developing the disease. One out of every 8 to 12 people is a carrier of one abnormal gene. Hemochromatosis is less common in African Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, and American Indians.
Although both men and women can inherit the gene defect, men are more likely than women to be diagnosed with hereditary hemochromatosis at a younger age. On average, men develop symptoms and are diagnosed between 30 to 50 years of age. For women, the average age of diagnosis is about 50.

Best of luck.
Hectorsf
Blank
1463054_tn?1286003703
Thank you so much. I have an appointment to sit down with my doctor once she gets in my records from my previous doctor.It is just so weird as I do not drink (not even a dose of nyquil), nor have I for 17 years. No drugs, no smoking,

Thanks again :-)
Blank
Post a Comment
To
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
Liver Disorders Community Resources
RSS Expert Activity
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
How to Silence Your Inner Critic an...
Apr 16 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eaters: How to Silence Yo...
Mar 26 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
1344197_tn?1392822771
Blank
Vaginal vs. Laparoscopic Hysterecto...
Feb 19 by J. Kyle Mathews, MD, DVMBlank
Top Digestive Answerers
Avatar_m_tn
Blank
me_just34
974371_tn?1364538460
Blank
Margot49
Central Valley, CA
317787_tn?1373214989
Blank
Dee1956
DC
Avatar_m_tn
Blank
pugdaddy
charlotte, NC
Avatar_m_tn
Blank
jimgreg
piqua, OH