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Bart and Foot Pain
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This forum is for questions and support regarding What Causes Lyme Disease, Diagnosing Lyme Disease, and Joint Pain. Topics for discussion also include Living with Lyme Disease, Babesia, Bartonella, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Anaplasmosis, other Tick Borne Diseases, Nervous System issues, Prevention, Risk Factors, Skin Disorders, Symptoms and Treatments

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Bart and Foot Pain

I've heard in passing from my LLMD's and through patient testimonials that Bart causes foot pain.

I have two distinct types of foot pain, brought on or worsened by different triggers, and I'm wondering if I should dismiss both as Bart or if their could be another culprit.

The worst of my foot pain comes on while I sleep or if I'm out in the cold.  I get a stabbing pain in my ankles, and turning my feet even slightly causes a sharp pain.  It is almost like there is a skewer through my ankle that makes turning/rotating my feet extremely painful.  To relieve this, I start to very slowly and gently rub and stretch my feet and eventually it will go away.  When I get this in my sleep it stays mostly in my ankles, but I've learned to not walk far in the cold because the pain will spread up into my legs and can take and hour or so to go away once I'm inside again.  (I learned this the hard ways years back when I lived in a big city and walked to work.  I actually moved further from work so that I could take the train and only need to walk ~3 blocks outside.)  While I still get this, it is one of my issues that has improved over the years:  It is less frequent, less severe, and now often on only one side.  Since the improvement correlates with my treatment, I figure this pain is Bart (or Lyme) related.

The other foot problem I have is that the bottom of my feet feel inflamed.  This is less predictable and while it is less severe it is also a total nuisance.  Lately when I go to the gym I often stop exercising because of this foot pain.  (Either foot pain or fatigue typically limit my efforts at the gym.)  Whether I do stationary bike, elliptical, or whatever, the pressure on the bottom of my inflamed feet becomes too much of a distraction.  This problem seems about as bad (or possibly worse?) than earlier in my treatment, making me wonder if I should pass it off as Bart/Lyme.

While I've often heard that Bart=foot pain, I'm not sure if my issues are typical or worth looking at in a different light.  I have this on my list of things to ask at my next LLMD appointment, but since it's been bothering me quite a bit lately I thought I'd put it out there for input.

6 Comments Post a Comment
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1763947_tn?1334058919
I have Lyme, Bart's and babs. I started out with the MS like symptoms of "electrical" shock type of pain in my feet, actually it would go from my shins to my feet. Currently, I have numbness in my toes and bottom of my feet. It seems to be slowly improving with treatment.
Not sure if that helps but because everyone experience things differently, your foot pain could very well be Bart's related.
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Avatar_f_tn
From what I have also read, it could be Bart. My PA says sore soles of the feet are more common with Bart.  I have also read that leg pain,especially below the knees, and foot pain are Bart related.  

The excruciating shin pain was a symptom noticed in soldiers in World War Ii who contracted trench fever, later determined to be bartonella quintana. More common with Lyme is bartonella henselae, formerly known as cat scratch fever and dismissed as minor and not requiring treatment. I tested positive for b.henselae, and I haven't had any leg or foot pain...just bad GI and neuro symptoms as well as anxiety.

There is really very little official research on Bartonella. Most information in the last decade is coming from the clinical experience of LLMDs, which means it is essentially ignored by the mainstream. The CDC admits it has not funded any studies into combinations of tick borne diseases, such as Lyme + Bartonella.

Recently, bartonella quintana has started showing up in Lyme patients. Most official information on it says that the diease is primarily found in places/people with poor hygiene, which in the US translates into the homeless and skid row residents (aside from trench-dwelling soldiers).  Once again, these bugs are not staying where they are supposed to!  I believe there are actually more than a dozen variations of Bartonella, most of which have never been studied and are not included in lab tests.

Yet another clinical diagnosis.  When I told my GP about it, she had to ask me to spell Bartonella. She had never heard of it before.  At least she is supportive of my treatment.

Are you taking an abx specifically for the Bart?
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Wonko
" I get a stabbing pain in my ankles, and turning my feet even slightly causes a sharp pain.  It is almost like there is a skewer through my ankle that makes turning/rotating my feet extremely painful. "

this happens to me, wrists elbows shoulders everywhere. shin bone arm bones..

I have no test results and am having the igenx test tomorrow.
all my WB are neg.
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1763947_tn?1334058919
I see a neuro chiropractor for all those pains, wrists, arms, shoulder and neck and find some relief there. I don't want to be on pain meds and can't take alleve or ibuprofen because of my Bart's ulcer.
Rico, I love all the knowledge you have, way cool , especially for folks like me with vision problems and can't research on my own.
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Avatar_f_tn
i found this. just asked my nurse to look into it.  i think i read

B. quintana also has been found responsible for a disease called bacillary angiomatosis in people infected with HIV and for infection of the heart and great vessels (endocarditis) with bloodstream infection (bacteremia). The full spectrum of disease caused by B. quintana is still unfolding.
Bacillary angiomatosis can be cured in most patients with antibiotics, so recognition is critical. Treatment recommendations are based on retrospective studies or clinical observations. No antibiotics have been studied prospectively.

Clinical experience strongly favors the use of erythromycin or a tetracycline derivative. Erythromycin remains the drug of choice because it yields an excellent clinical response in almost all patients. Tetracyclines are the first alternative in patients who cannot tolerate erythromycin. A combination of doxycycline (100 mg PO/IV q12h) plus rifampin (300 mg PO bid) may be used in immunocompromised patients with severe disease.
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Avatar_f_tn
Good research!  Let us know what you hear back and what you do.  I suspect there is a lot of this going around, and we [the docs!] just don't recognize it.  
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