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3 month old with eczema
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3 month old with eczema

My little boy is coming out with small dry red circles around his arms and upper body. Seems to be eczema which others in my family suffer from. Can anyone help me with treatments both medical and non-medical ?
A concerned dad.
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Is it from allergies? or just hereditary?
Well your best bet is to go to the doctor for advice, see what creams or medication is best for your son
How long has he had this....sometimes a milk allergy  can cause eczema(not saying that is it)
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My Daughter has has eczema since birth, really bad during summer. Just recently she was put on Elidel, but thats when she was about 18 months, I dont know if they would prescribe it for a 3 month old.
I have used so many lotions and the one that works the best for her is Gold Bond Medicated Fragrance Free, the bottle is white.
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my son has had since birth.  Any metal causes it  (we even had to change his tie at school)  we found the only thing that works for him are the tiny tubes of steroid cream.  (they started prescibing them at weeks old)  generally I ask for as many free samples as they weill give.  Becuase the tube is about the size of a pinky finger and costs a lotof  money.  Good luck
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You don't live in el paso by chance do you? The water here causes alot of children to get stuff like that, and the dry weather doesn't help ither.
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Found this online...

The basics of preventing eczema including avoiding known triggers, such as harsh soaps, bubble baths, overheating and sweating, wool and polyester clothing, etc., and keeping your child's skin well moisturized. Since it is often hard to identify and avoid triggers, moisturizers can be the most helpful thing to avoid eczema flares.
To help avoid dry skin, you should give your child a daily bath using lukewarm water and a mild, moisturizing soap or soap substitute. Afterwards, cover him with a moisturizer as soon as possible to seal the moisture into his skin.

Although there are many types of moisturizers, a greasy ointment will likely work best. These can include Vaseline and Aquaphor, although creams may also work well. You should avoid lotions and oils. When choosing a moisturizer, you may have to try several and just see what works best for your child.

Treatments
When your child's eczema gets worse or flares, the typical treatments include topical steroids and the newer non-steroidal medications like Elidel and Protopic.
Topical steroids can range from over the counter hydrocortisone creams, which are very mild and may even be used on the face, to stronger mid and super-potent steroids that require a prescription. In general, super-potent steroids are avoided in children, and intermediate or mid-potency steroids are more commonly prescribed, such as Cutivate, Dermatop, Elocon, and 0.1 percent Triamcinolone. Even these can cause side effects, including skin thinning and stretch marks if they are used for to long in the same place. They should also not be used on a child's face or under occlusion, like under a diaper.

Newer immunomodulators or steroid-free topical medications are also available to treat children with eczema, including Elidel and Protopic. They are generally used twice a day and can be applied to all areas where your child has eczema, including his face. Keep in mind that they don't work as quickly as topical steroids do, and may require four to six weeks to see full results. They may also help avoid flares if you then begin using them at the first sign of itching or a rash.

Antihistamines are also often used as part of a good treatment regimen for eczema. They are particularly helpful if itching is interfering with your child's sleep, in which case a sedating antihistamine, like Benadryl or Atarax, may work well. Cold compresses can also be effective at helping your child control his scratching when his skin itches.

Other treatments are also available for very difficult to treat cases of eczema, including using wet dressings, oral steroids, ultraviolet light therapy, and immunosuppressive drugs, like cylcosporin.

What You Need To Know
Although there is no cure, many children either outgrow their eczema or it at least gets better as they get older.


Eczema does run in certain families and can be associated with other 'allergic' type disorders, like allergic rhinitis and asthma.


You should apply moisturizers on top of your child's other topical medications during eczema flares.


Most experts now recommend that your child take a daily, ten minute bath to help moisturize his skin. As long as you immediately place a moisturizer or lubricant on his skin after his bath, it should keep his skin healthy and well hydrated.


Be ready for times when your child's eczema may get worse, including the winter, when your house may be dry, and summer time, when he may be swimming or getting overheated outside.


Keep in mind that skin infections often accompany difficult to treat eczema flares and your child may sometimes require an antibiotic, in addition to his usual eczema treatments.


If your child's eczema isn't improving with standard treatments, you should see a Pediatric Dermatologist for further help and treatment advice.
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