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When did your kids start talking?
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When did your kids start talking?

Ok, I feel kinda silly asking this question considering I have 4 kids...When did your kidos start talking? My son is 16 months and can say mama but he doesn't look at me and say it, it's more like mamamamama, just repeditive sounds, same with dada. He said Eddie once. He says no, but it's just like mama...nonononono. He shakes his head when he says is while he is getting into some kind of trouble. So I know he know's what it means. We try and get him to say things and he just won't. I know he understands what a lot of words mean, he just won't say them. All my other kids said words WAY before this. I know that all kids are different and do things at different stages and it's never a good idea to compare. But isn't it getting a little late for him not to be saying anything? He has Hydrocephalus but no brain damage at all. So we don't know if the lack of talking could be from his medical problems? any help would be great! Thanks!
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159354_tn?1286371288
I'm not sure what the medical condition is but I guess it's possible...has the drs showed concern?  

My DD was talking at a year old....fluent...sentences...GOD help me I think I have a lawyer or politician on my hands.

She is now 2 and talks in sentences..2-3 sentences at a time.

I only have her so no experience with any others.  

I was a nursery director for infants 0-2 for 5 years however and several kids were not talking much more than what you described at 12-15 mos so maybe your son is just a little behind.

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Avatar_n_tn
wide range of 'normal'. our first didnt talk at all till 18 mo, then more or less in complete sentences. 2nd started babbling around 12 mo. 3rd, he's 20 mo and doesnt say a word, so pediatrician hooked him up with the state (they have to provide free speech/lanaguage services till the school district takes over) and he's in 'therapy' now where they're teaching him signs, which he's picking up very quickly. if you're worried, talk to the pediatrician.. but at 16 mo i wouldnt worry, esp if he's making SOME sounds.
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159063_tn?1247276417
I had to laugh at your post about your daughter talking. mine talks non- stop she is 8 now, but doesnt shut up.. ever!!! she talked full sentences at an early age as well.. Im glad to  know its not only me. I love her dearly, but sometimes I wish she would just stop talking..
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159354_tn?1286371288
GREAT!  That's what I got to look forward too?  LOL
It's funny sometimes DH and I look at each other like why? why us?  We are both so reserved and quiet....and then there is chatterbox....talking up a storm.

And all her sentences start with Mom...Mom this, Mom that...

She's trying out the Mom and Dad thing now verses Momma, Mommy and Dadda.

It's so funny to hear 2 year old call me MOM.

LOL
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Avatar_f_tn
How cute!  My son is now 3 and still can't stop talking!  The stuff that comes out is hillarious, but he is always talking.  I thought boys were supposed to be more quiet?  Anyway, he was an early talker, walker, crawler, you name it.  I can't keep up with him.  All kids are different though, I have a nephew who is 6 months older than my son and he can barely talk.  At around 2 they took him in to be evaluated and he is in therapy as well, but he wasn't even making noises or babbling at that point.  I have heard that sometimes kids don't talk as soon if they have siblings to do the talking for them.  Our friends had that happen.  The littlest one didn't need to walk or talk because all the others did it for him.  Finally the pediatrician told them to back off and make the little guy help himself, worked like a charm.  I wouldn't stress, but would mention it to your Dr., they may have some tips for you.
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Avatar_f_tn
Hello, Nalla.  I am a speech therapist so I would suggest that you take your child to be evaluated.  It's perfectly fine that your DS is not producing many words at this point (I have a 15 mos old niece who isn't talking much as well).  I don't know what state you live in and if you have Early Intervention in your state but if you do and if they say that your child's delayed, he'll be eligible for free speech therapy until he's 3 years old.  I treat children from 2-18 years of age and I see so many variations.  I have kids who came to me non-verbal and a few months into therapy would not stop talking.  It very well might be that they just matured enough for talking (that's always a possibility) but taking your child to be evaluated and getting speech therapy cannot hurt.  Good luck.
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Avatar_f_tn
Thank you all for responding. We live in Wa. and haven't heard of the early intervention thing. How can I look into that? My sister and I did all of our talking for our youngest sister when we were kids, but I know that isn't the case here. My older kids love to try and help him say different things. My 9 year old loves to read to him and show him the pictures and try to get him to say things. So he isn't too young for speech therapy? I'm not worried right now, just with him having some medical problems I don't know when to be worried if that makes sense.

mum2beagain- does your son just have hydro? My son also has Spina Bifida. When I was pregnant the Dr's told me that there was a chance of nothing being wrong all the way to retardation. But there has been no brain damage so far, so they said that is a good sign. But a lot of people I have talked to said that there may be dealys. it may be in speech or reading, math, etc. We just have to wait and see. It's hard with him because I don't know where to draw the line where "normal" is and when to get some help. Can a baby at that age get speech therapy? I know that if we call his Dr. we can get that set up if need be. Developmentaly he seems to be on track (mentaly I mean) he knows where some of his body parts are: nose, eyes etc he can do simple comands like if I say clap he will, etc.
He is my 4th child but a lot of the time it feels like I am a first time mom again. Especialy sinse he is my only boy! LOL
Does your son have a shunt? Have you had many problems with it?
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Avatar_n_tn
My son is 18 months old and the only things he says are mama and dada.  I was stressing over it quite a bit but his pediatrician doesn't seem concerned at all.  I don't know if this is just a stereotype but it seems like little boys take longer to start talking, a lot of people with sons have told me that.
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Avatar_f_tn
Many of the younger siblings speak later b/c everyone does the dirty work for them and there is no motivation for htem to speak.  Just try to model for him, saying wht he wants and encoruaging him to at least try to say the word before you give him the item he is requesting.
If you are very concerned, you can always get him tested through Early Intervention, free of charge.  Call your county health services or even school district for the number.
Good luck!
(a school psychologist)
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Avatar_f_tn
A child can get speech services from birth if he/she has a medical condition.  In your case, your DS can be evaluated and he may be developmentally fine that he may not get free services but since the evaluation is free, you're not losing anything.  I don't know what the laws are in Wa state and what the requirements are to be eligible for early intervention.  I'm from NYC.  I think that asking your pediatrician's office about available services is a safe bet.  Hope it all works out for you and it's true what they say: boys are developmentally a little behind than girls.  Good luck
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127529_tn?1331844380
Nalla My son just has Hydrocephalus; he was born 8 weeks prematurely and had a ventricular bleed. He was shunted when he was three months old, we (touch wood) have never had any problems with his shunt. James did suffer a small amount of damage to the left hand side of his brain that left him with a right sided physical weakness, as a result he was quite delayed with his gross motor skills, and he just started to walk last month. His speech isn't too bad, he started saying individual words at around 16 months and has just started putting one or two words together and learning words to describe how he feels (sad, cold, hungry words like that). As I mentioned earlier he has had a few problems with texture and was diagnosed with mild sensory integration dysfunction, he hates the feel of things like paint, play dough etc and doesn't like to have his hands dirty. This seem to be the reason why he dislikes some textures of food, he gags if you give him mixed textures, everything has to be chopped finely to the same consistency and he won't spoon feed himself, but he is fine with finger foods like sandwiches crackers, fruit etc. He is also just developing his self help skills (undressing and such) but I think toilet training is still a while away for us. James is probably delayed in his development by about six months (physically a little more because of his right sided weakness), but he was also a preemie which can delay development too. Talk to your pediatrician about early intervention programs, James has a physic and occupational therapist, it has been decided that he doesn't need speech therapy at the moment but it may be something we do later.

I know several children with hydrocephalus and there really is a very wide range of how they are affected, one boy I know who is 3 months older than James is both physically and mentally disabled and blind. Another girl I met was six years old and you would never have known she had anything wrong with her. I also know Emma Tucker who is featured on ASBAH's site and her development was delayed by a few months when she was younger, she is 3 1/3 now and caught up in most areas of her development.
As I said ASBAH is a great site full of useful information, there fact sheets are really good and can be printed out and they come in different formats for parent, teachers and care givers.

Living with a child with hydrocephalus can be quite challenging; I often ask myself is James doing something because of his hydrocephalus or is it just normal 2 year old behavior. ASBAH gives you loads of information on dealing with behavior and explains why it is sometimes different to "normal" behavior and how to handle it in different ways. James is my first child, I am sure every parent is proud of their child achievements, and I am especially proud of how far James has come: the day he walked I cried, we had wondered if he would ever do it!

Good luck to you and your family.
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127529_tn?1331844380
James has a PHYSIO not a PHYSIC ! (Dam spell check)
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Avatar_f_tn
Thanks everybody for your thoughts and all the info you gave me! I will look into all of it. You all were very helpful! I'm going to call about the early intervention in the morning! Thanks again!!
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Avatar_n_tn
I was going to post exactly what Morgan said! I think later siblings have the older ones that probably do a lot of the talking for them!!! I think boys in general tend to be slower to develop vocabularly than girls (my dd was rattling off the alphabet at 18 months!) whereas my ds who is now 3 can only just remember all of it!!! I also have another ds who is 16 months nalla and the most common word he uses is 'mama' to get what he wants (and why not...it works!!!). However he does have many other words like 'car', 'barbie' (thanks to his older sister!), 'toot-toot' for train, 'yes', 'no' 'was dis' ("what's this?") to name a few. He also speaks loads of jibberish in sentences...I don't understand what he says at that point but all the intonations are there in his speech. I am 17 weeks with #4 so I wonder how this one will go, but I still think it's early enough that speech therapy isn't really a problem yet, particularly if he is understanding much of what you are saying. But you are his mother and you know him best so do what your gut instinct tells you!
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