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breech baby and c-section
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breech baby and c-section

My wife is quickly approaching week 39 and our baby is still breech. We are living in Mexico City and recently have been given reason to question the quality of care. Our doctor seems all too ready to do a c-section but says simply that it is routine. A family friend and OBGYN says however that breech C-sections are more risky than other C-sections for the same reason that breech vaginal delivery is risky.
I am searching for anything from people with experience in this.
Is there anything we should be aware of going into this? Questions we should ask the doctor about procedure? Should we put our minds at ease, or jump on the next plane heading state-side and hope the insurance comes through for us?
Any comments will be appreciated.
Thanks.
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Avatar_n_tn
Please, please, please investigate your options!! My husband is a chiropractor (and myself one in training) and there is an all-natural chiropractic procedure called the Webster Technique that works a high percentage of the time to have the baby turn into the correct position without the need for a C-Section.

For more information, go to the following website and click on the link for the International Chiropractic Pediatric Association (http://www.icacweb.com/AssocFrames.htm)

On this site, you can find a chiropractic doctor in your area who specialized in the Webster Technique (this is a special certification that some chiropractors have - and you can find one on this site). I've known many women who've had the Webster Technique turn the baby into position and avoid the pain, recovery and scars of C-Sections!

Let me know if we can help you further! Good luck to you and your wife.
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Another, more common option, is an external version, where mom and baby are monitored, the belly is lubed up well and the doctor attempts to guide the baby into a head down position. Here is a link that offers more information on it.

http://familydoctor.org/310.xml

We used to have a labor and delivery nurse on here, hopefully she will pop on and be able to offer some more advice on this procedure.

Andi
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Avatar_n_tn
If you have access to an acupuncturist they may be able to help. They could do a moxibustion treatment, which will help the baby turn to the proper position.  If you go this route, make sure that you use an acupuncturist that has worked on pregnant women before.
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Avatar_n_tn
That's the problem with the medical community - too many unecessary C-Sections. People disregard them as "routine", however, this is MAJOR surgery. Again, investigate the Webster Technique. It's all-natural, drug-free, takes a matter of minutes and is super effective. People certified in it also perform this procedure at the hospital. Doesn't matter how big the baby is or how far along she is...it works!

Acupuncutre is also a good option!!
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Avatar_n_tn
my friend's baby was breach. she went for an external version, but they could not turn the baby. he was ??franks breach-- bum down, head & legs up. trying to get him to turn was terribly uncomfortable.  anyhow, the next week  she had a c-section-- healthy baby boy.
good luck.
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Avatar_f_tn
If this is your first baby, breeches are almost universally delivered via C/Section, even in the US.  As another poster mentioned, external version can be done but needs to be done asap.  There simply isn't much room any more to turn a baby (again, if it's your first).

The risks of a vaginal breech delivery outweigh the risks of a C/S done for a breech.  Really, there isn't a lot of difference between a C/S done for a breech and any other one.  

If its your second or third child, a C/S still would probably be recommended in the US, although if you attempted a version it is more likely to be successful.  Depending on the presentation (whether the feet are presenting, or the butt), some doctors will allow you to attempt to labor if this isn't your first child.

I think the worst thing you could do now is to get on a plane (most airlines have restrictions on flying in the last month, anyway, especially internationally).  A C/S is pretty universally used for breeches here.

Maybe someone else will have a different recommendation for you, but thats my thoughts.  The chiropracter/accupuncture ideas won't hurt, either.  

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Avatar_n_tn
I had a c-section with my son.  He was Frank Breech.  I am very glad that we did not attempt any type of proceedure to turn him. As we found out during delivery that it very well could have cost him his life.

When my son was delivered via c-section, the doctor discovered two things that he was unable to see from the ultrasound

#1.  My sons head was litteraly stuck in my rib cage.  His head had apparently grown while in there and wedged inside.  He had brusing and a slightly misshapen head from this.  The brusing took nearly 4 months to finally diasppear.  And he still (at 3 years old) has a slight indentation in the back of his head (thank God no complications from it though)

#2.  My son's umbilical cord was in a "true knot".  This means that it was in fact in a complete knot and had he decended into the birth canal, it could have cut off his supplies from me.  

In addition, we later found out that I was in fact Group B strep positive.  The culture was not ready at the time of my emergency c-section (I also had low amniotic fluid).  He very well could have contracted it during a vaginal delivery.  

I know that c-sections are done many times when they are not necessary, but there are times that they are.  In the case of a frank breech baby, it is very hard to turn them, and impossible to deliver them vaginally without them being turned. Has the doctor told you what type of breech your child is, or explained to you how it is laying?

Thanks to my having a c-section, I have a handsome (now 3 year old) son.    

I opted to have a c-section with my daughter as well since I had already had one c-section.  My doctor gave me the option of a VBAC, but I decided against it.  I was up and going the next day.  I only stayed overnight in the hospital.  I was at the mall and movies with my family from out of town a mere 6 days after delivery -- no lie.  And I was able to go out dancing with my husband before he had to return to Korea (he is in the Army) a mere 2 weeks after my c-section.  

Good luck to you and your wife.  I wish you a safe and happy delivery and a beautiful baby too!!

Amanda
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Avatar_n_tn
I agree with the poster stating that there are too many unnecessary c-sections done nowadays! At 36 weeks with my second my dr. was trying to force me into a c/s "just because I had one with my first and this one was a little bigger". I wanted a VBAC. After changing doctors it was possible and successful.

That being said, a c/s for a breech baby should not be considered unnecessary. Are there options? sure. Unnecessary is scheduling a c/s for a certain birthday or soemthing stupid like that. My oldest was frank breech and sideways (like profile view) to top it all off.

I'm sure the options people have listed about trying to turn baby could possibly work. The question is how late in the pregnancy are those still successful considering she is only a week out from her due date, and could at this point go into labor at any time, I personally believe a c/s is not a bad start. I know of someone who had her son turned because he was breech approaching due date. He turned with the externally procedure. Well lo and behold when she went into labor, he had reverted BACK to breech position.

If you are considering more children, make the doctor aware of this. Ask if it be possible to have low horizontal uterine incision (some people presume the uterine cut is the same as the abdomen based on that scar). Because she would be having a necessary c/s, but  not necessary due to her own health concerns (i.e pre-eclampsia, diabetes, etc), speak to the doctor about this procedure being done appropriately leaving the option open in the future for your wife to deliver vaginally. The key is open up that communication with your doctor about your wishes and be a good patient,listen to the doctor, try to understand, ask questions, and in the end decide on what's right for everyone involved.

Whatever you choose, I wish you and your wife the best of luck and a happy healthy baby!!
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