Maternal Expert Forum
Pilonidal Dimple
About This Forum:

Patient medical question and answer from The Maternal and Child Health Forum. Health topic area and articles about newborn care

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
This expert forum is not accepting new questions. Please post your question in one of our medical support communities.
Blank Blank

Pilonidal Dimple


  My son was born two weeks ago with a Pilonidal Dimple.  The Doctor told us to watch it and keep it clean.  The Doctor informs us that an MRI might be necesary when the baby gets older if it interefers with the baby's walking.  If everything is O.K. then when he is 18 he may need surgery.  I am trying to find out more about this disease when one is born with it.
  Thank you very much for any assistance and information you can provide.
Related Discussions
Avatar_n_tn

_
Dear Randy:
I apologize for the delay in responding.
As the fetus develops, the open neural tube closes like a zipper, beginning in the middle and progressing to the ends. At times, the closure does not proceed normally, resulting in a defect obvious at birth. A myelomeningocele (herniation of lining and related neural tissue) is the result. Loss of control of lower limbs, bladder, and bowel, as well as deformities of the back, often ensue. Other examples of abnormal development of the spinal cord and surrounding vertebrae (dysraphic states), include meningocele (herniation of lining without neural tissue), spina bifida occulta (defect in vertebrae alone), diastematomyelia (bony spur divides the spinal cord), and tethered cord (the cord is stretched during growth of the child). All of these other defects may affect use of the lower limbs as well as bladder and bowel.
Diastematomyelia and tethered cord are most often occult in early life. However, such underlying abnormalities are most often heralded by overlying changes in the skin. Collections of blood vessels (hemangiomas), benign fatty tumors (lipomas), hair tufts, and occasionally dimples may provide a clue to such disorders and permit early diagnosis before permanent damage to the spinal cord occurs. Most dimples are blind (i.e., not connected to the spinal canal) and are not associated with any such underlying threat to normal functioning. At times the blind pits or dimples develop ingrown hairs after adolescence and become infected. Surgical treatment may be necessary to remove the pilonidal dimple then.
I hope this explanation is useful. It is provided for educational purposes only.
HFHS.MD-HSW
KEYWORDS: occult spinal dysraphism, diastematomyelia, tethered cord  




Continue discussion Blank
MedHelp Health Answers
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
RSS Expert Activity
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eating Control: How to St...
Aug 28 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
233488_tn?1310696703
Blank
New Cannabis Article from NORTH Mag...
Jul 20 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
3 Reasons Why You are Still Binge E...
Jul 14 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank