Memory Loss Community
sudden onset of memory loss
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Memory loss (amnesia) is unusual forgetfulness. You may not be able to remember new events, recall one or more memories of the past, or both. . The purpose of the community is to share support and information with Memory Loss patients, their loved ones, and caregivers. Topics in the community include: causes, clinical trials, complications, family issues, living with Memory Loss, prognosis, research, surgery, treatments.

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sudden onset of memory loss

My significant other is a young male late 20's no serious medical issues. He recently had an episode where he lost complete knowledge of the world around him. Did not know who anyone was, where he was. Could not recall the month etc. He said he had a warm burning sensation in his head accompanied by a headache. After about 2 hours of going in and out of this state, he regained his full memory (but could not recall the memory lapse episode). His body showed signs of weakness up until about 8 hours after the incident. No specific side of the body, just lack of strength to stand up on his own and what seemed like motor impairment. My first thought was he had a stroke... is this possible? He did not show any signs of weakened facial muscles or an extended period of time with weakened limbs. There was no visible sign of the body experiencing any trauma immediately before the SUDDEN memory loss. Any thoughts? He does have some signs of PTSD from military past. Could this be related? He had been drinking that night but much less than usual.
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There is such a thing as a TIA (transient ischemic attack), which resembles a stroke in how it works but reverses itself within about 24 hours if I remember correctly on the time frame.  However, please note that one of the hallmarks of a stroke or stroke-like event is the inability to speak in coherent sentences, can't stick out the tongue, facial weakness on one side, etc.  You mention there was no sign of the last two and I don't see anything that would indicate he had issues with speech, just with memory.  My instinct is this is something else.

However, without having taken him to a doctor during this time as you probably should have since it was odd behavior and could have been something serious, there's no way to know for sure without those test results.

I would have him go in for a full physical (and push for an early date with mention of what happened) and make sure he reports this incident so a doctor's professional insight can be added to this situation.
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1530171_tn?1362547225
Hey lah731.
Welcome to the forum.

For starters, to my opinion this should be investigated thoroughly and ASAP!
An MRI or CT scan or even better a SPECT scan
which is a more dynamic imaging procedure that measures
blood flow, may help get some answers.
Possible underlying causes would be TIA -as pointed out by thatquietgirl-
Low grade(2 or 3) Brain Aneurysm or PTSD.
Alcohol consumption, smoking, stress, anxiety, copper deficiency, atherosclerosis, high blood pressure are some of the possible contributing factors. Addressing  the ones present - it is rather easy to verify this - would be of great preventive value, for the time being until a firm diagnosis
is given and also for the long term, regardless of the treatment offered.

In regards to PTSD, Energy Psychotherapy is by far  the most effective
and efficient Therapy for PTSD.
END OF PART 1

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1530171_tn?1362547225
PART 2


A study conducted in 2009 by Diepold and Goldstein,  determined that energy therapy shows promise as a treatment for PTSD:

"This study examined a group of veterans with PTSD and their family members, and after five days of daily treatment with energy therapy, the group no longer scored positive on standard military measures of PTSD. A one-year follow-up found that the group had maintained their gains. In addition, energy therapy treatment resulted in significant improvements in other co-occurring measures of psychological distress, including anxiety and hostility. The breadth and severity of psychological problems also decreased significantly, with gains maintained at follow-up.

"The study concluded that although the 5-day intensive treatment delivery protocol used in this study involves a considerable commitment of resources, the alternatives are more costly. The medical and economic costs to society of PTSD sufferers, who would otherwise face many additional years of impaired functioning, are substantial. Energy therapy merits consideration as a treatment for PTSD and co-morbid conditions in veterans and other at-risk populations."

If you need any more details, as I'm familiar with this field, please post again or send me a message.
Wishing you both well.
Niko
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