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Vision changes, headache, and numbness and tingling
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This forum is for questions and support regarding migraine and headache issues such as: abdominal migraines, headaches caused by allergies, cluster headaches, headaches, headaches in children, migraine headaches, sinus headaches, tension headaches, visual disturbances.

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Vision changes, headache, and numbness and tingling

I'm a 21 year-old female, and my problem started about two weeks ago, when i woke up one morning with blurry vision.  My vision didn't seem right, and it felt almost as if my eyes couldn't accomodate to the light.  I went back to my bed, thinking that lying down for a while would help, when suddenly i got this horrible pain on the left side of my head, near my temple.  After lying down for a while, my right hand, arm, face, and tongue (progressively) went numb. It was like a tingling sensation with decreased sensation.  I went to the ER and they did a CT scan that showed no abnormalities.  I have not had another episode like this one, but every time i bend over, i get the sharp pain in the same spot on the left side of my head. Am i crazy?  Does anyone know what could be going on?
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Hi

There can be several causes for headaches like primary headaches which are not associated with any other diseases (example migraine, tension headaches and cluster headaches) or secondary headaches that are caused by some associated disease. The common causes for secondary headaches are withdrawal from caffeine, high blood pressure, brain tumors, strokes, meningitis.

Although difficult to say exactly without an examination, you might be having migraine headaches.
Migraine headache is often described as an intense pulsing or throbbing pain in one area of the head. It is often accompanied by extreme sensitivity to light and sound, nausea, and vomiting. Migraine is more common in women than in men.

Sometimes the onset of a migraine attack can be predicted because it is preceded by an "aura", visual disturbances that appear as flashing lights, zig-zag lines or a temporary loss of vision. The usual triggers are a lack of food or sleep, exposure to light or hormonal irregularities (only in women), anxiety or stress.

Migraine headaches are usually diagnosed when the symptoms described above are present. Migraine generally begins in childhood to early adulthood. A family history is usually present, suggesting a genetic predisposition. With advancing age makes other types of headaches more likely.

Treatment is there for both the prevention as well as abortion of an attack. Paracetamol or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAIDs), triptans, ergot alkaloids and anti-emetics are used for treatment of migraine. Hormone therapy may help some women whose migraines seem to be linked to their menstrual cycle. Stress management strategies, such as exercise, relaxation, and biofeedback may also reduce the occurrence and severity of migraine attacks.

You should consult a doctor for proper diagnosis if the headache is bothering you. Various tests such as blood tests, CT scan, MRI or lumbar puncture are usually necessary to establish a diagnosis of headaches.

Take care!

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