Multiple Sclerosis Community
Foot drop
About This Community:

Our Patient-to-Patient MS Forum is where you can communicate with other people who share your interest in Multiple Sclerosis. This forum is not monitored by medical professionals.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank Blank

Foot drop

When I first stand up and (no matter how long i have been sitting) my feet hurt. It almost feels like walking on painfully swollen feet (kinda numb) but they are not swollen. I am in limbo as far as a diagnosis and i was wondering if what I am feeling sounds like foot drop or a stage of foot drop? Sometimes it effects the way I walk but the pain and stiffness subside eventually if i walk around long enough. The pain is worse in the evening and last for longer periods of time. I have read posts by others about foot pain but i have not come across the same "swollen' feeling being posted by anyone else. i was just wondering if there was anyone out there that has similar foot pain?
Related Discussions
3 Comments Post a Comment
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
Sounds a lot like something I had a few years ago called plantar fasciitis. You can look up the definition, but it involves the tendons on the bottom of the foot where they attach to the heel and follows the arch of your foot. The areas where they attach get microscopic tears when you stand up after being off your feet for any length of time(the longer you are off your feet, the worse the pain when you stand back up again).

A podiatrist can help treat you if this is the problem-usually with arch supports or sometimes with a splint to wear at night to keep your foot flexed; both methods accomplish the same thing by keeping the tendons stretched out so they don't develop tears each time you are on your feet.

I hope this helps a little...good luck and hope you are on the mend soon!

Jen
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
I have this issue also, I literally lose circulation in my lower legs at times. Standing in one place for a few minutes (even doing dishes) my feet and lower legs turn purple. Very painful. I have found that the more active I am, the end of the day it is worse. I sometimes feel as if I am walking on needles.
Blank
279234_tn?1363108849
I have foot drop. It does cause my feet to feel numb, and  I occasionally have a swollen feeling (without being swollen). The numbness seems to be more on the top of my foot, rather than the bottom.

When you experience foot drop, your will also have weakness in your ankles and toes. I have a hard time pointing my toes upwards and in a downward position. This is also the case with my ankle. It seems like it stops at a less than a 90 degree angle, and will not bend upward or downward fully. It only effects my left foot/leg and because of my ankle and foot reacting this way, I walk with a limp.

Depending on my fatigue level, and how much I've use the leg, my leg/foot issue will be worse in the evening, however, I wake up with this numbness on a daily bases. Because of the weakness in my toes, I can no longer get up on my tippy toes on that leg, and I can not walk on my heels. These are some of the type of  test the neuro will have you perform  during a neuro check to test for weakness in the foot/leg.(getting up on your tippy toes, walking on your heels).

If this sounds like what you are experiencing, I would contact you doctor for a check. Foot drop according to the Mayo clinic is caused by:

weakness or paralysis of the muscles below the knee involved in lifting the front part of the foot. The underlying causes of foot drop are varied. Often, neurological, muscular and anatomical problems overlap.

Specific foot drop causes may include:

Muscle or nerve damage. An injury to the muscles that control the ankle and toes can cause foot drop. Sometimes nerve damage — from an injury to the nerves in the lower spine or leg to the long-term nerve damage of diabetes (neuropathy) — causes foot drop. In other cases, nerve damage occurs during hip or knee replacement surgery. Pressure to the nerve on the outside of the shinbone just below the knee (peroneal or fibular nerve), as you might experience if you sit with your legs crossed for too long, can trigger temporary foot drop.

Muscle or nerve disorders. Various forms of muscular dystrophy, an inherited disease that causes progressive muscle weakness, may contribute to foot drop. Various forms of compartment syndrome, a condition characterized by the compression of nerves and blood vessels within an enclosed space, may have the same effect.

Central nervous system disorders. Disorders that affect the spinal cord or brain — such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis or stroke — may cause foot drop.


Blank
Post a Comment
To
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
Multiple Sclerosis Community Resources
RSS Expert Activity
469720_tn?1388149949
Blank
Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm-treatable... Blank
Oct 04 by Lee Kirksey, MDBlank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
The 3 Essentials to Ending Emotiona...
Sep 18 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Control Emotional Eating with this ...
Sep 04 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
Top Neurology Answerers
667078_tn?1316004535
Blank
HVAC
Durham, NC
572651_tn?1333939396
Blank
Lulu54
Dayton, OH
338416_tn?1413581329
Blank
jensequitur
Fort Worth, TX
1831849_tn?1383231992
Blank
kwarendorf
Great Neck, NY
Avatar_f_tn
Blank
SarahL2491
Alagash, ME
147426_tn?1317269232
Blank
Quixotic1
Washougal, WA