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How MRI's Show MS Lesions
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How MRI's Show MS Lesions


MY QUICK AND DIRTY EXPLANATION OF HOW MRI'S SHOW LESIONS IN MS

I am going to overexplain the MRI with contrast / without contrast thing again, so that you and your husband can have it as clear as possible in your minds.

MS does it's damage by causing the nerves in localized areas in the brain and spinal cord to lose their protective sheaths, called myelin.  At first, when the myelin is being attacked, the body brings a higher blood supply to the area to fight the attack and the area becomes inflamed.  These areas, now become lesions.  At this point they are called "active lesions."   At first the nerves haven't changed much and they appear (and have the same density) as the healthy areas around them.  At this point after some time, probably months, the body CAN repair the damage and remyelinate the nerve.  This repaired nerve still won't be as good as new, but the lesion "looks" like normal brain.  Sometimes later an old scarred lesion will "reactivate" and the adjacent areas will inflame and have increased blood flow.

If the attack on the myelin sheath is too strong for the immune system to repair, more and more myelin disappears and the area of nerves eventually dies.  Then it contracts and scars.  The blood flow is decreased to that area and the area becomes "less dense" then the surrounding normal nerve tissue.  After a longer time - probably years - the scar can reabsorb and the area becomes "empty."  It's called a black hole.

When you image these lesions with an MRI you can see different things, depending on the technique,the age (stage) of the lesion, the power of the MRI, and whether contrast is used.

The first image is done without contrast.  This technique will show old lesions that are big enough to be seen by the power of that MRI machine.  WE KNOW that many lesions in MS are too small to be seen.  If the newer, more powerful MRI with a 3 Tesla magnet is used many more lesions will be seen (by at least 25%) than on the older 1.5 Tesla machines.  The classic old, mature MS lesion is a little bit oval, will have well-defined borders and will be in the white matter.  Characteristic places are subcortical, peri-ventricular and in the corpus callosum.  The classic MS lesion will also have it's long axis perpendicular to the ventricles of the brain.  Also, important and very symptomatic lesions are found in the brainstem, the cervical and the thoracic spine.  The spinal cord ends at the bottom of the thoracic spine, so there is no such thing as a lumbar spinal cord lesion in the normal spine.

These scarred lesions will show up as light, bright areas.  These are the classic, MS lesions or "plaques."

Now the very old, scarred ones that have been reabsorbed will show up as a black (empty) space or black hole.  If there are many of these empty areas the brain will contract around them eventually and show up as a loss of brain volume.  This is also know as brain atrophy.  This is particularly seen in the progressive types of MS.

However, a newly active MS lesion may not show up on a regular MRI because the area of nerves, though inflamed, is still pretty much intact and has normal brain density.  On the MRI it will look like normal brain.  Without contrast it won't show up and will be missed.

When the next phase of MRI is done the contrast is in the blood vessels.  So the large blood vessels show up, too.   Anywhere the tiny blood blood vessels are more dilated than usual, as in inlfammation, the areas will "highlight"  or "enhance."  They show up as even brighter.  So new lesions will show up as enhancing, or active.  Also, older lesions, that have undergone new attack right around them will show an enhancing rim or ring.  When you compare the regular MRI to the Contrast MRI you can see this reactivated, old lesion.

That's how some reports can call active lesions or some report no newly enhancing lesions.  Also since some new ones heal they can be compared to old films and show they disappeared.  In addition, between different sets of MRI done after a time has passed, the radiologist can see an increase in old and in new activity.

Please ask question where I haven't been clear.

Quix
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Avatar_m_tn
Very well done, good resource.
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Thanks for the info. You went into great detail. Are you a nurse or in health care field or have you had MS for wahile, so you know these things?? I noticed alot of people post to you for advice. Glad there's someone with knowledge, who can help us. Thanks
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147426_tn?1317269232
Well, my first draft has some things missing in it and was originally part of an answer to EL48.  So it reads a little weird.  I edited it a bit and added a paragraph about the commonest lesion; the old, bright lesion.

MY QUICK AND DIRTY EXPLANATION OF HOW MRI'S SHOW LESIONS IN MS


MS does it's damage by causing the nerves in localized areas in the brain and spinal cord to lose their protective sheaths, called myelin.  At first, when the myelin is being attacked, the body brings a higher blood supply to the area to fight the attack and the area becomes inflamed.  These areas now become "lesions."  At this point, when they are inflamed and blood engorged,  they are called "active lesions."   At first the nerves, themselves,  haven't changed much and they appear (and have the same density) as the healthy areas around them.  After some time, probably weeks to months, the body CAN repair the damage and remyelinate the nerve.  This repaired nerve still won't be as good as new, but the lesion "looks" like normal brain.  Sometimes later an old scarred lesion will "reactivate" and the adjacent areas will inflame and have increased blood flow as the renewed demyelination takes place.

If the nerves do not remyelinate and the damage continues, for a long time the lesions sit as scars.  These scarred areas have damaged and dying cells in them, the blood supply shrinks, and the areas are not very dense  - not as dense as the normal brain around them.  These are the classic MS plaques and are considered old lesions.

If the attack on the myelin sheath is too strong for the immune system to repair, more and more myelin disappears and the area of nerves eventually dies.  Then it contracts and scars.  The blood flow is decreased to that area and the area becomes "less dense" then the surrounding normal nerve tissue.  After a longer time - probably years - the scar can reabsorb and the area becomes "empty."  It's called a black hole.

When you image these lesions with an MRI you can see different things, depending on the technique, the age (stage) of the lesion, the power of the MRI, and whether contrast is used.

The first image is done without contrast.  This technique will show old lesions that are big enough to be seen by the power of that MRI machine.  WE KNOW that many lesions in MS are too small to be seen.  If the newer, more powerful MRI with a 3 Tesla magnet is used many more lesions will be seen (by at least 25%) than on the older 1.5 Tesla machines.  The classic old, mature MS lesion is a little bit oval, will have well-defined borders and will be in the white matter.  Characteristic places are subcortical, peri-ventricular and in the corpus callosum.  The classic MS lesion will also have it's long axis perpendicular to the ventricles of the brain.  Also, important and very symptomatic lesions are found in the brainstem, the cervical and the thoracic spine.  The spinal cord ends at the bottom of the thoracic spine, so there is no such thing as a lumbar spinal cord lesion in the normal spine.

The  scarred lesions will show up as light, bright areas.  These are the classic, MS lesions or "plaques."   But, with just the regular MRI one can NOT say if it is old and dormant or if it has active inflammation in it.

Now the very old, scarred ones that have been reabsorbed will show up as a black (empty) space or black hole.  If there are many of these empty areas the brain will contract around them eventually and show up as a loss of brain volume.  This is also know as brain atrophy.  This is particularly seen in the progressive types of MS.

However, a newly active MS lesion may not show up on a regular MRI because the area of nerves, though inflamed, is still pretty much intact and has normal brain density.  On the MRI it will look like normal brain.  Without contrast it won't show up and will be missed.

When the next phase of MRI is done the contrast is in the blood vessels.  So the large blood vessels show up, too.   Anywhere the blood vessels are more dilated than usual,  bringing more blood to the area, as in inlfammation, the areas will "highlight"  or "enhance."  They show up as even brighter than the brain around them and brighter than an old, scarred lesion.  So new lesions will show up as enhancing, or active.  Also, older lesions, that have undergone new attack right around them will show an enhancing rim or ring.  When you compare the regular MRI to the Contrast MRI you can see this reactivated, old lesion.

That's how some reports can call active lesions or some report no newly enhancing lesions.  Also since some new ones heal they can be compared to old films and show they disappeared.  In addition, between different sets of MRI done after a time has passed, the radiologist can see an increase in old and in new activity.

Please ask question where I haven't been clear.

Quix
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147426_tn?1317269232
Hi, I didn't realize that you didn't know I am a physician.  I was a pediatrician for 23 years, disabled by vertigo about 6 years ago and diagnosed with MS 5 months ago after having an "evil" and nasty neurologist ignore my symptoms and misread my MRI's for a couple of years.  I spend time here trying to help people make sense of what might be happening to them and trying to help people get around doctors who dismiss their complaints as psychosomatic.

Being here helps me feel useful.  It's both a selfish thing and a way to keep my years of education from going to waste. My story is on the thread on this page called "What I Went Through to Get a Diagnosis of MS."

Quix
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233622_tn?1279338505
Very interesting reading. What would you do if your neurologist disagreed with the radiologist MRI report?

The radiologist says my MRI shows demylenation. The neurologist says the spots are from blood pressure, which has been controlled for years with medication. She said the spots are not the right shape or in the right spot.

They are in the right posterior frontal subcortical white matter. Oh, and my MRI was done on a Telsa 1.  Sorry if I have asked this before....can't remember! Who do I trust?

LATW
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199882_tn?1310188142
I was told by my neurologist at the Mayo Clinic that the damage I have cannot be repaired.  He said that the myelin could not repair itself.  I know that I probably missunderstood him but my whole family understood it the same way.  Is this right or wrong?

One more question please,  A test of the paraneoplastic autoantibody screen showed elevated ganglionic acetylcholine receptor antibodies.  The level was 0.05 with the normal being 0.02 or below.  What does this mean and how would it effect me?    I don't know if it even has anything to do with the MRI's or not but it was written underneath my MRI report.

Thank you for everything,

Carol
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230625_tn?1216764664
Thanks so much Quix!!  Great info!  Very concise and informative! :)

A question for you ~ what is the difference between T1, T2 and FLAIR?  My neuro said the FLAIR images were best to look at when we were viewing my films.

Have a great evening!  Pat :)
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Avatar_n_tn
Thank you for the info, it's amazing.

I just had one more question.  I have small white circular dots all over my MRI films/pictures, not sure what to call them.  Do you know what those could be?  I know I'm going to the doctor soon, and will find out, but it kind of bugs me to see on the film.  And I"m just curious by nature.
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Could you please take a look at my posting about my test results when you get a chance please?  I'm not wanting you to interpret anything, just want your opinion on my neurologist.  I hope you are doing well, and look forward to hearing from you.

Jenn
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198419_tn?1360245956
Thank you so much for the above MRI/Lesion explanation - it's so thorough, helpful and written in a way that can be understood and retained.
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230948_tn?1235847929
Very interesting info where do you find the time to do all this research your amazing!!

Iv got my scan on the 14th of August and i am so worried they will miss something im already getting worked up that this will not show something and im on a long journey to find out whats wrong!!

Iv cut and pasted the info as off to spend some time with my husbands parnets as finding it hard to look after kids as feeling rough so will read it in more detail when i get back.
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Avatar_n_tn
I'm wondering if you could comment on my situation.

I went to the ER because I was very dizzy.  I have high blood pressure and suspected it was up (I had not been taking my meds for a long time - bad, I know).  Blood pressure was up - 184/126.  They did a CT to see if I had a stroke.  No stroke, but the CT showed "brain atrophy."  My primary physician ordered an MRI.

My MRI report says, "In the periventricular deep white matter are multiple abnormal bright T2 and FLAIR weighted foci, which do not appear to contrast enhance.  Their location and appearance is suspicious for demylenating disorder, such as multiple sclerosis.  The rest of the brain appeared unremarkable. There are no contrast enhancing lesions.  Posterior fossa appeared unremarkable.  Brain stem appeared normal.  Seventh adn eighth cranial nerves appeared unremarkable.  The parasellar region appeared normal."

I have an appointment to see a neurologist on 8/20.  In the meantime, I can't help but wonder if there's any chance what they're seeing could be indicative of ALS, since my mother died from ALS.  I guess what confuses me about what the MRI report says is where it says "there are no contrast enhancing lesions."  I thought with MS they were supposed to see lesions on the MRI - or is the report saying there are lesions, but they do not contrast enhance?

Anyway, any thoughts you have are appreciated, and you are doing such a wonderful thing here - definitely using your education for good.  Many thanks.
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I have a few more thoughts to add to my previous post - sorry to be a pest.  I don't really think I have any symptoms.  I play drums, and have experienced no lack of coordination.  I'm a secretary, so I practically type for a living - no new problems there.  I do have trouble standing from a seated position, feeling like my legs aren't going to support my weight, but I've passed that off as I'm just too **** fat and I don't excercise, so of course my legs are weak.  I can't stand for very long without "concentrating" to do it, and then I still feel tired or achy in my leg muscles, but again, just too fat?  I do get cramps in my legs frequently, but I figure that's dehydration (I don't drink enough water, that's for sure - working on that some), or low potassium, so I eat a banana (or, oddly, eating a dill pickle seems to help).  On a positive note, I moved into the second floor of an apartment building a few weeks ago, and since being there have found that I can take the stairs easier than before, which leads me to sort of rule out ALS because if I had lost muscle I wouldn't be able to build it up again if it was ALS.  Can you build muscle when you have MS?  Of course, I'm hoping the diagnosis is not ALS or MS, but perhaps just that I'm too fat, but then, why the brain atrophy on the MRI?  Again, thanks for taking the time to read all these posts and to give your opinion.  It is much appreciated.
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147426_tn?1317269232
Hi, Welcome to the forum!!  You have found the right place, but sort of posted in a place where not many people would find you. Would you copy your posts above, adding anything you want to them (more info is better than no info)?  You will have your own thread and we all can talk to you better.

Quick answer because I know you're worried.  No NOTHING in what you posted sounds like ALS.  And no, you CANNOT rebuild weakened muscle in ALS.  

Talk to you more after  you post on the main forum page.  If you are reading this, then right at the bottom of the page is a blue button "Back to Forum."  Click on that and then at the top of the page click on "Post a Question."  The paste in your two posts and we will flock to your side.

Quix
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Karina - I misread your name long ago and have repeated the mistake many times since.  I'm so sorry!  Glad to have you back posting regularly.

LATW - You definitely need a tiebreaker - or two.  If you look at my post above you'll see that I had a radiologist and my neurologist misread two of My brain MRI's.  One went to great lengths to say that he would mention my 1cm, well-defined, oval bright spot (Called a UBO- Unidentified Bright Object) ONLY for the sake of completeness and that it was normal for age.  My "evil" neuro looked at it and emphasized that they didn't know what caused UBO's but that they were insignificant.  They were both wrong.  In the face of neurological symptoms NO lesion can be dismissed.  Yes, typical lesions in MS have a characteristic pattern and shape.  Yours don't.  This lessens the likelihood of MS, but does NOT RULE IT OUT!  Get thee to a good second opinion.

One place to get the names of Doc's that see a lot of MS patients is to attend a local support group (though often they don't meet in the summer because of the heat) but they will tell you who is compassionate, who is smart and who they've dumped.  We are a vocal crowd, lol

You need another evaluation, including a thorough neuro exam (Momzilla can now tell you what a thorough exam looks like) and a new opinion.  A 1Tesla machine won't show nearly the true number or shape of MS lesions.  Make sure you are not mixing up the MRI report which talks about T1-weighted images.  This is not talking about the strength of the MRI magnet, but of an imaging technique.  If, indeed, your images were on that old a machine, discuss with the new MS specialist repeating the images on a newer, more powerful machine.

If you go this route I again highly recommend a concise timeline!!

CAROL!  - I hope you see this.  What your doctors told you is correct.  Your lesions were old, scarred and some were becoming black holes, I think.  No, Once they get to the bright stage seen without enhancement, I do not think that they can heal, because by then they are scars.  I do not think they think you have relapsing-remitting.  That is the category that can see some healing and resolution of lesions.

Lesions that heal - These are seen only in Relapsing-Remitting MS - RRMS.  They correspond to the relapses which can be so dramatic as to involve blindness or paralysis, but then over time the symptoms may completely disappear.  This is due to a lesion who had damaged myelin, but that the body was fairly successful at remyelinating.  Again, studies show that the "remyelinated" nerves are not as good as new.  Their nerve signal conduction remains a little slower and they are more fragile.  But those lesions which caused that relapse may disappear within a few months.

Carol - I don't know much about the paraneoplastic syndromes.  On my next foray into looking things up I'll check out that antibody.  Sorry.  You need to tell us how you are doing on the new treatment?  How ARE you doing?

Pat - Boy!  I was really hoping you would not ask that PARTICULAR question!  Arggghh...  Okay, I  was looking up for a good description and didn't readily come across an easy one.  I did find a thorough discussion of the T1 - T2 topic.  It is a deeply scientific matter of mathematics and physics and trying to read it made my brain hurt!  :(  So, I will describe what I understood.  Where the stuff is really technical (ie. I don't understand it) I will just refer to the "miracle.

The T1-weighted images and the T2-weighted images refer to the different rates and strengths of the electromagnetic pulse that is sent through the body to the receiver.  There are long-strong pulses, short-strong pulses and long and short weak pulses.  In a miracle the machine and the programmers use these different pulse/spin sequences to make the different tissue structures in the body stand out from each other.  In the 20+ years of studying the miracle they have discovered that different tissues (brain, bone, liver, blood, etc) all show up best using different pulse techniques.   Many of these have to do with that tissue was compared to water,   They have also discovered that certain combinations of techniques show abnormalities like tumors or scars or whatever.  That's it, folks.  I can't get any better than that.  I do know that T1 images show the CSF to be white and the brain medium and the bone black.  T2 (which I think are the most commonly displayed) show the bone to be white, the brain medium gray, and the CSF to be black. (they are flip-flops or positive/negative of one another)  But the computer, during a miracle, compares these two and further delineates (distinguishes) things that weren't really apparent on either type image alone.

The FLAIR is a little easier for me, but still involves a miracle happening.  It stands for FLuid Attenuated Inversion Recovery.  It is another miracle of pulses and signals.  It's purpose is to distinguish things that border on ares of fluid (mostly for our purpose - CSF).  Apparently a lesion right up against the ventricles can blur out and be missed.  The FLAIR technique recovers information and through a miracle makes the lesion show up.  There!  Here is the link that made my brain hurt:

http://spinwarp.ucsd.edu/neuroweb/Text/br-100.htm

Hi Corinne - I can't picture little white dots.  So sorry, I will answer your question that you posted, though a little later.  I have to bring up your old posts and reread them to see.  I don't keep my opinions active (I don't remember them later) as I talk to people.  I can't keep that much in my head and I've already, in three months here, learned how often I'm wrong (lots).

And finally:

LATW - No "enhancing" lesions means there are no "new" (6 weeks or less old) lesions that enhanced because of increase blow flow (inflammation) to them.  It doesn't mean there were no lesions.

Quix - Out for the count!
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Quick and Dirty.  Someone on this forum is FINALLY speaking my language.  I knew someone was going to let their hair down after a while.....And I had a feeling it would be the doctor.  Ya Hoo!

I had to read it a few times, but I am getting the "picture."  Thanks for painting it so well.  I love the miracle metaphor.  It's like magic, right?  Some kind of holy smoke happens in there?  Give me a few more weeks on my fish oil (supposed to help with cognitive function) and it just may click completely.

You da man, Girl!

Zilla*
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147426_tn?1317269232
Just bumping it up. Q
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Avatar_n_tn
sorry, i meant MRI in my previous comment.
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Avatar_n_tn
I was just wondering if anyone knew how early in the disease process lesions would show up on CT?  I have numerous symptoms of MS but my CT came back clean.  Currently I have all these symptoms and no diagnosis.
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147426_tn?1317269232
It would depend on how large the lesions are.  If the areas of damage are new they could show within the first month, but most lesions are in the brain and most brain lesions don't cause symptoms, so it would have to be a lucky coincidence.  By the time a person has their first attack, and is diagnosed on MRI they typically have several old lesions already.

Quix
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Avatar_n_tn
Hi -
I began to notice numbness and tingling, on my right side.  When it was just my hand and arm to elbow, I attributed to carpal tunnel and cervical disk due to previous 2000 MVA.  However, when it went to leg, foot to knee, same side/same time, I sought immediate medical treatment with my PCP.  CT was WNL.  MRI/MRA showed 3 lesions, done w/o contrast.  Repeat 4 weeks later with contrast showed enhancing lesion in one area.  Continued with tingling/numbness/spider on the face sensation, mostly on right side (lesions on the left).  On 07/12 was hospitalized with acute loss of function on right side.  Uncontrollable shaking in R leg and arm.  Short term memory loss.  Was hospitalized 6 days, high dose IV steroids, LP done, standard EEG and EP EEG (found to be inconclusive???)  Was not able to track to the left.  Regained function on right side after 2 days and gait resumed.  Repeat MRI w/3 Tesla showed one new lesion (Doctors had all my previous records).  Drs. suspicious for MS, but not convinced yet.  LP fluid final studies showed I met the minimal requirements for MS based on Mayo Clinic standards.  Since home, still with balance problems.  Stand up and close eyes will tip, pivoting or quick movement makes me lose balance and fall into furniture, etc.  Have acute jaw tightness.  Hard to open enough to eat, yawn, speak.  Put on Baclofan TID, and tapered as tolerated.  However, after getting down to 2 Balofan per week, am now back up to BID to TID as the pain, tightness/spasm back.  Also having leg spasms that wake me at night.  I have been exercising on my stationary bicycle BID but don't see any improvement.   When I go back in time, things make more sense, for whatever illness I have, as I was in very minor MVA in 12/06, and ended up in ICU with loss of function in right leg and put on high dose steroids with improvement and then home PT, regained function.  Then in March 07 taken to ER for uncontrolled shaking on right side, but never followed up on.  I am worried that I may have MS, but even more concerned for ALS, as I am doing all the things I feel are right, but not really getting better.  Also, I find myself going into a room trying to remember why I am there.  I failed to mention, I am only 42.  Any insight from anyone would be appreciated.  I have a great neurologist, and he is cautious and treating me symptomatically and watchful waiting - will repeat MRI in Sept.  He has me home on disability at least through September 07, but I hate to bug him continuouly about my concerns.   I called him 2 weeks ago when I woke up w/loss of vision and pain in my right eye, which returned in 48 hours, but that was scary and he and I did talk then.
Thanks in advance to anyone who can respond.  I am the mother of 2 boys, 8/10 y/o and the oldest has Asperger Syndrome.  I need to try and understand what is happening to me, as being healthy for them is of great significance to me.
JoNoMom
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147426_tn?1317269232
No nasty comments from real MRI techs who understand this stuff! lol. Believe me, it's a miracle!. Q
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198419_tn?1360245956
Jazzy and Harrie -
This may help w/the Lesion Healing question you posted  - it explains the demyl and remylenating process really well. . . .
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266400_tn?1193638081
bumping up for someone
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147426_tn?1317269232
This is not the MRI explanation we want to use.   There some inaccuracies (not to mention a ton of typos!). I rewrote it and added a whole bunch of stuff.  the newer, revised thread is called, "MRIs, Lesions, and Symptoms."  We've been trying to keep it near the first page.  Let's let this one drift down and disappear into fable and song.  Quix
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bump for our newbies
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195469_tn?1388326488
Oh sorry Quix...didn't know you wanted this one to drop down...I am SO sorry...don't read this one Melinda, read MRI's, lesions and Symptoms
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Avatar_n_tn
I have just stumbled to your article through googling.  I have a 42 year old brother who has had MS for 12 years and was diagnosed relapsing-remitting.  He was doing very well living on his own, then slowly started not regaining what he was losing during an attack.  He is now living in a long-term care facility.  He has been having seizures as of late, the last episode he had a major seizure accompanied with aspirated pneumonia.  An mri was done and the specialist came and talked with us.  His words were "I am shocked at the substantial amounts of lesions he has on his brain, compared to the mri done 6 months prior to this"  Each day we see him deteriorate in some form.  His short term memory is totally gone, he can no longer stand at all, he is totally wheelchair bound and needs a lift to get in and out of bed.  I know this may seem like a cold question, but in your opinion, how long can this go on??  He is taking a drug for the seizures and we are keeping him comfortable with only pain meds, as is his wish.  I am his POA, and I am just trying to figure this all out.  I would so welcome your opinion.  Thank you for being so real!!  (It is what is missing out of our medical fields!!)  Thanks so much!!

alovingpoa
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147426_tn?1317269232
I am so sorry to hear what your brother and you are going through.  It must be terrible and, of course, you don't want him to suffer endlessly!!  It is a very normal question and not cold at all to my mind.  I am not an MS expert, but a fellow sufferer who is trying to learn about the disease.  I have not had experience with any people long-term as their disease worsened.  So, I have no words of wisdom or knowledge to answer you with.  I am sorry.

I wish you both less suffering,

Quix
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147426_tn?1317269232
This is not the best version of this discussion.  the one on the "Health Pages" is more thorough.  Please read it instead.

Quix
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Avatar_f_tn
Quix, could you help me out, please?
I had my first symptoms about 4 months ago. It began with shaking of the right side, and a total loss of strenght. My left leg had no strenght and my right one, whenever i could get myself up (when i try to get up off a chair i feel like an 11 month pregnant elephant!) it starts wobbling around. I can't right, so i wanna kiss whoeven invented laptops. I also felt a terrible numbness in my feet and shins. One very hot day, after enjoying a music festival in Virginia, we went home with my boyfriend and i fell to the ground, not able to move. I asked him to "take whatever it was covering my feet" and he said "you're barefoot". The worst symptoms were not able to pronounce words ans sound like a drunk idiot, not remembering words, spasms, double vision and one time i got into my car and couldn't remember how to get to the gas station. But the fatigue is impossible to bear. I'm out of breath just sitting in my car. Typing is a nightmare. I have to go back over and over again and change the words i thought i meant and ended up typing something else, sorry for the typos. I was ok during a vacation, i could walk without my pink can (hey, i'm a girl in style!) and was better with the shakes and fatigue. After i came back, my parents insisted in me getting an MRI and it came out "clear" according to the MD they wanted me to see (who suggested a shrink since i have too many tattoos and that's the work of the devil.. Catholic Hospital) when i went to see my Neurologist, he looked at the MRIs and said, well, i see a couple of things, but this worries me a little. When i got the MRI they also took pictures of stuff that look more than a thunderstorm than a brain. Sorry, i can't remember which part of the brain they are, i guess it's the top? He said there was a vain that looked ok. It kinda twisted, came back and went "back", like a tail. The opposed one was supposed to do the same, but no "tail". All i have gotten is Xanax and Clobazam for the "shakes". But i haven't been able to get out of the bed for 3 days since i can't walk. My legs won't take my weight. I'm 5'7" and about 125lbs, so it's not like i'm too fat. I have spasms again and a weird feeling in my face. Tingling in my hands and of course, the pain, needles and pain came back to my legs and knees. I'm desperate. I'm (was) a student and i used to go to class at night, i also suffer from AS and imagine the pain. But i know how AS pain feels, and this is different.
What can i do to make my Neurologist take me seriously? it seems all they want to do is pat you in the back and send you home, but i know there's something wrong. Any help?
Thanks, guys.
Farrah
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338416_tn?1260996698
Farrah, welcome to the forum!

Could you repost your question as a new thread?  Also, because many of us (including me!) have a hard time with reading big blocks of text, break up your post into several different paragraphs.  (Just putting a return every five sentences or so really helps!)
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Wow, where to begin, yet keep it concise. All my life I've suffered from severe anxiety. I'm now a 54 year old woman and I live on a disability due to GAD and Depression. I recently went through a series of psycho-vocational tests and the psychologist said that I have Asperger's Syndrome. After I read info on Asperger's, it explains just about everything all through my childhood, adolescence and adulthood. However, over the past few years, perhaps due to my ineptitutde in social gatherings and my horrible childhood, I've developed a "benign" head tremour. My husband was killed by a drunk driver 20 years ago and was burned severely. He lived for 7 hours and I was with him during his last 4 hours, although he wasn't conscious. My whole body began to tremble and tremour and it seems to subsiand come back. I'm sorry for being so lengthy about this explanation, but I've been treated for depression and GAD but my current doctor is sending me for an x-ray of my back and and MRI at the local hospital. I asked him why, but he's very terse. His reply was, "MS." That was it.  My head tremour is very evident when I'm under extreme stress, and I often have a couple of beers to get it under control. I've been a benzodiazepene in one form or another for about 30 years now, but even they don't reduce the tremour. (The reason for the seeming  misspelling of my words is because I'm a Canadian and we follow British English.)
I read in your text that there is a blood test that will exclude other things, but not necessarily show MS symptomology. I'm almost 55 years old! Isn't this rather late to find MS?
If you could add any comments to this I would greatly appreciate it.  I do hope I rememebered your username and applied it correctly.
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Hi Guys, more story is quite long but I will go into the full detail to see what people think.  I would appreciate anyones comments as I am quite depressed at the moment.  13 years ago I had some pins and needles in hands and feet, some numbness, double vision and some blurring of vision and some bladder problems.  Most of my symptoms were sensory.  I went to neurologist who did Evoked Potentials tests which the checkerboard one was abnormal.  I had a brain MRI which was normal and I was put in hospital and had predinisolone via drip (large dosage).  My optic discs were pale. I also presented with abnormal reflexes, clonus in my ankle, hyperreflexia etc.  I also had lots of burning and cramp like pains, plus some muscle twitching.  My neurologist was certain I had MS.  He repeated an MRI 2mths later and that was also normal.  The machine was very old..  I had another MRI of spine and head another 6mths later and then he said maybe it's not MS but you can't totally rule it out. So I was confused. So now 13 years on my symptoms have raised their ugly head again, I have always had some symptoms but mainly when I get tired, sick (run temp) or really stressed. I felt that my symptoms were new this time and worse, I had vertigo, some facial numbness, burning and pins and needle in my stomach and bum as well as my feet. My left leg has always been worse, it was a sort of prickly feeling.  I decided to go back to a new neurologist and get a second opinion. This guy specialises in MS.  He seemed to think it was a MS like thing and that I definately had lesions and that perhaps the new MRI machine would show old lesions.  I had an MRI done and it was clear.  I was depressed, I know that I don't want to have MS but I did want an answer as my groin and pubic area was going numb and I had suffered a few probs with my bladder etc. and the prickly feeling was driving me insane.  I was prescribed Gabapentin to take and told that it was likely to be Transverse Myletis and he didn't think that it was new but prob from 12 years ago.  Now 6mths since my last visit I have had another flare up. This time my whole left leg has gone numb, like it's dead, or gone so bad to sleep, the sensation when you lay on something funny but not pins and needles, just really heavy so it makes it difficult to to walk on and clutch in the car etc. but today it's okay.  My GP did a CT scan of my lower back as I was convinced that I had something pressing on that bundle of nerves but that was clear too and then I cried and now I'm quite depressed as I feel like I'm going crazy.. I am  otherwise healthy, I take no medication (not even the Gabapentin was was prescribed but I think I will give it a go.) Can MRI be in accurate? Why is nothing showing for the level of symptoms I have.  I know the neurologist believes that I have lesions in my spinal cord. THe MRI was a T3 machine.. brand new. Does anyone think my symptoms sound like MS?  I have good and bad days and my left leg always feels a bit weaker than my right...I did have vertigo last time when I had my symptoms and the dr reckons it was migraine caused by the lesions but I don't get headaches as such..?  but the vertigo seems to have gone away now.. along with the facial symptoms.  I only seem to have some muscle twitching in my thighs when I go say walking up the drive etc. (our drive is steep).  I am otherwise fit, I don't do drugs etc, I am not overweight.  But I must admit this time round I have found my symptoms have got to me and I know if I have another MRI and it's clear I will be depressed as I am starting to feel like I am imaging my symptoms or am just crazy.  Sorry for the long winded post, just needed to put it all out there and see what people say.  I have an appointment with the neurologist in about a weeks time.

CHeers,
Udkas

Open to ideas?
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Avatar_f_tn
I am glad I got this blog. I read your explanation of MS and found it to be very informative.  But, I would like to ask a question. In January 2006 I had a MRI done on my brain and the report came back saying I had lesions on the brain, possible MS. Then the neurologist (I did not like) dig a lumbar puncture and sent that off to be tested. He said that it came back ok. I am still worried about the lesions on the brain. Is there something that I should do or go from here?
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147426_tn?1317269232
Hi!  Welcome to the Forum!  Have you been reading here long?  You landed on a very old version of the MRI and lesions discussion.  the one in the Health Pages (upper right hand corner) is better.  I looked at your profile and you have an amazing number of things going on.  Would you be willing to start a new discussion and tell us about yourself?

As you know we can't diagnosis anything online - there just isn't enough info.  But, I can talk about things in the context of MS and I will answer your question.  IF the neuro (whom you don't like) was considering MS when he did the spinal tap, then he was wrong to tell you that MS was ruled out because the fluid was normal.  A normal spinal tap (especially 2 years ago) does not mean that you don't have MS.  There is NO requirement for the tap to be positive in order to diagnose MS.  In fact, there is no requirement EVEN TO DO A TAP in order to diagnose MS.  In Europe they do not use the spinal tap routinely at all.

Now the lesions could be many things.  But you should have someone tell you what they likely mean before you can just dismiss them.  I would encourage you to seek out a new neurologist.  Why was the MRI done?  What problems and symptoms have you had?

But, we would like to know more about you.  From your profile I see that you must have a very complicated medical past and see that you are on oxygen.  If you would start a new thread - just go to the top of this page and click on "Post a Question."  Your post will be lost here and people won't see you.

Welcome again, quix
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Avatar_f_tn
I NEED SERIOUS HELP. I AM 41 YEARS OLD SUFFERING FROM EXTREME FATIGUE,FEELING LIKE SOMETHING CRAWLING OUT FROM UNDERNEATH MY SKIN ON BOTH ARMS AT DIFFERENT TIMES, ACHY BODY LIKE FLU, LOW GRADE TEMP MOSTLY AT NIGHT, JERKY EYE TWITCH,UNABLE TO REALLY TASTE OR SMELL ANYTHING, NO SEX DRIVE, ON AND ON. BEEN TO SEVERAL DOCTORS WITH MOST OF THEM SAYING THAT IT IS FIBROMYALGIA. TESTED NEGATIVE FOR LUPUS. CANNOT FIND ANYONE WHO WILL LISTEN TO ME. HELP!!!
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HI, I AM NEW TO THIS AND WOULD VALUE ANY INSIGHT.  I AM 45 YR, WHITE FEMALE, RN, WHO WAS DIAGNOSED WITH GRAVES DX 3 YRS AGO.  I HAVE HAD INTERMITTENT LEG WEAKNESS DURING AND AFTER GRAVES TX.  I HAVE BEEN ON PREDNISONE THERAPY THROUGHOUT THE LAST YEAR DUE TO ASTHMA EXACERBATIONS.  10 MOS AGO I FOUND I WAS UNABLE TO WALK UPSTAIRS WITHOUT LEANING AGAINST THE WALL, INSOMNIA, DIFFICULTY GETTING OUT OF A CHAIR, SOME FORGETFULLNESS AND FATIGUE.    I FOLLOWED UP WITH ENDOCRINOLOGIST WHO DID LABS AND THYROID WAS GOOD BUT ANA WAS 1:320 SPECKLED.  I NEXT WENT TO RHEUMATOLOGIST FOR LUPUS TESTING.  ALL LABS NORMAL EXCEPT ANA 1:160 SPECKLED AND HOMOGENOUS. NOW I HAD INCREASING LOWER BACK PAIN .  PCP DID XRAY AND SHOWED SIGNIFICANT COLLAPSED VERTEBRAE IN LUMBAR. FOLLOWUP WITH NEW  RHEUMATOLOGIST 2 DAYS LATER. RHEUMATOLOGIST SAID NO "COLLAGEN DISEASE" AND DID LUMBAR MRI - SHOWED NO COMPRESSION AND SHOWED NO REASON FOR MY INABILITY TO CLIMB STAIRS OR INCLINES.   REFERRED TO NEURO.  NEURO CHECKED FOR MYASTHENIA GRAVIS, ALL NORMAL LABS/TESTS.  I NOTICED AN AREA OF NUMBNESS ON MID BACK LEVEL - MRI OF THORACIC WAS DONE AND ESSENTIALLY NORMAL.  -- SOME MEDIASTINAL CYSTS FOUND OF UNKNOWN SIGNIFICANCE.  NEXT  NEURO APPT TO DISCUSS TESTS AND HE STATED THAT IT WASNT MYASTHENIA GRAVIS & NO NEED FOR MRI OF HEAD, AS I SUGGESTED,  BECAUSE HE DIDNT THINK IT IS MS. ---ALTHOUGH, MY LEG MUSCLES FEEL LOCKED UP AND VERY TIGHT AND MY RIGHT LEG DRAGS WHEN WALKING.   I CANNOT WALK NORMAL FROM LEFT AND THEN TO THE RIGHT LEG.  I HAVE HAD SOME TINGLING WHEN WALKING AND FEELINGS OF WARM WATER SPLASHING ONTO CALF.  TODAY DURING HIS LIMITED NEURO EXAM, 2ND VISIT,  MY ARMS/HANDS WERE SHAKING AND MY LEG COULD NOT MOVE ONTO SHIN OF OTHER LEG. NEURO DOC SAYS HE IS SENDING ME BACK TO PCP  BECAUSE HIS MYASTHENIA GRAVIS TESTS WERE NORMAL AND ASKED IF I FELT OVERLY STRESSED.      HE DID STATE THAT HE WOULD ORDER THE MRI OF HEAD IF I WANTED IT.   PLEASE HELP!  I FEEL LIKE THIS DOC JUST BASICALLY SHOVED ME AWAY.  DO I PROCEED WITH MRI AND PCP FOLLOW UP.   THANKS FOR LISTENING, KYMME
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1253197_tn?1331212710
Hi there Kymmemar

I would suggest that you copy and paste your post into a new one. Many people will fnd it difficult to read a block of text in capitals and willl be unable to respond as they can't read it all. I never even realised this myself until I read other people's comments and realised that it applied to myself.

If  you break your writing up into smaller shorter paragraphs this will help everyone to read it more easily, and especially Quix who gets a lot of posts to digest and respond to.

Best wishes

Sarah
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Avatar_f_tn
Hi all,

After 5yrs of all kinds of funky symptoms, a diognosis of Fibromyalgia and arthritis. As you can imagion i am fed up.

4yrs ago i was tested for MS and after an MRI was told the symptoms were in my head and that i was depressed (if only)
Last week i was told all previous diognosises are wrong and need to be seen by a nero specialist AGAIN!.. as i have lost all reflexes in my feet, ankles and knees. and have no sensation up to my thighs. I am confussed finding it harder and harder to walk and have been told i am drunk many times. I have developed a squint, blurred vision and been told my eye twitches what ever that means.

am wondering if 4yrs on am i wasting my time trying to get the right diognosis or just give up and try to get on with life the best i can?
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1453990_tn?1329235026
MRI is only one part of an MS diagnosis.  Some docs insist on the MRI.  If you still have symptoms, forget about the old diagnosis or what was or wasn't on the MRI.  Goto a neurologist and have them check your symptoms and signs.  

Bob
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Avatar_f_tn
Hello,

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Avatar_f_tn
ok that went wrong :)

I agree the symptoms are still there and annoying/bothersome, but everytime i go for tests it seems they either disappear or don't show up in tests and then i feel stupid, am told it's in my head, i am imagioning it etc,

the irony is that Dr's find them when they are not looking for them haha.
I spose if anything i am now thinking they are taking everything from the last 5yrs and kicking out all other theorys and then i go for these test and nothing shows up again i am left where this all started with no answers and the feeling that i am infact going mad.

woozy16
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1660252_tn?1302557099
I am a 34 yr old mother of 2 and am so scared and convinced that I have MS.  All other blood tests were normal, and I go for an MRI this week.  I have have pin/needles sensation all over my body and burning in my feet that comes and gos.  Memory is declinging too, and arms feel heavy at times.  I am very fatigued and sometimes have dizzy spells.  What could this be if it's not MS, because all this signs point to it?  crazydaisy
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Avatar_f_tn
Hi.  I'm feeling very awkward putting this on a blog, but peace of mind is worth more than a few moments of awkwardness.  Several years ago I had some really weird things going on physically.  In short, the mri revealed 1 round spot on my brain in 2004.  Then, 2 years later there were 4.  Very small, very round.  I was told that MS lesions are crescent and these may just be "aging" spots.  I'm 46.  Recently, I've experienced nerve damage to my left foot; it has been getting worse.  I've lost range of motion.  It tingles, burns, and shoots pain up my leg.  I cannot sit on my feet without jumping from the darting warm, burning sensation that pricks as it spreads out.  I've sustained no injury to this foot, although there is a benign tumor in my big toe.  Most of the daily pain is located on the sesmoid (sp) bones which are regularly inflamed.  I've been to 3 foot doctors.  Only one has taken my "pain" seriously.  He has ordered orthodicts and I've spent 8 weeks in a walking cast.  I hadn't given those spots much thought until he told me the nerves were damaged.  Now, I'm concerned.  I should also be forthright in sharing that I probably have a conversion disorder, but I firmly believe with counseling that I am able to differentiate this issue.  It manifested itself in "seizures", and as soon as they told me what it was, it stopped and my "alert" is always on for such physical manifestations.  This is my question, should I be concerned about the foot, or should I simply brush it off as a conversion disorder manifestation?  
Thank you,
Ginger
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572651_tn?1333939396
hi Ginger and welcome.  would you do us the favor of copying what you wrote and reposting is as a new thread?

this is apretty old disccusion and few people will take the time to go back and read new comments.

Also, Quix is on leave right now, and putting this in a new thread gives others the chance to help you with their replies.

I'll be watching for the new one.......
Lulu
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Avatar_f_tn
Hi,

I am a 20yr. old girl and  have recently been having symptoms that seem very characteristic of MS, but have not yet found out my diagnosis. The symptoms have been occurring periodically for 3 weeks and include tingling in my hands/arms, feet, and face. They spring up usually in the afternoon or evening and seem to worsen progressively over a few hours and then gradually diminish if not resolve completely over another few hours. Sometimes I go days feeling normal, but for the most part it has seemed like something has been tingling at any given time throughout the 3 weeks. The attacks that I have been experiencing usually last only hours (and therefor seem to not be relapses of MS), but sometimes I'll have tingling that remains in my hand or foot for days after all the other symptoms have become resolved. I got an MRI exactly one week after the first attack and the MRI report from the radiologist said everything was "normal," but I don't know what the strength of the machine was. I am currently waiting to see a neurologist and hear their interpretations.

My question is:
Is only a week after the very first symptoms too early for lesions to be large enough to show on an MRI?
Also, does the fact that my symptoms usually resolve in anywhere from 4 to 12 hours mean that I could have lesions that are too small to show on an MRI and do they seem like MS relapses?

I also wanted to say thank you. I have been obsessively researching the symptoms for and information about MS since my first attack and have been confused about many aspects of what I have read.
One of these confusions was whether or not lesions would only show WHILE symptoms were being experienced (because my MRI was done at a rare moment of complete normality for me).
Your clear and understandable description as well as your answers to many of the other questions asked have been such a relief to much of my frustration of reading other articles full of medical mumbo jumbo.
In what has been one of the scariest times of my life (being in limbo of not knowing my diagnosis), I really can't tell you how much it means to me that people like you are here to make it just a little easier to educate myself about what is happening to me.
Thank you so, so much.

-Alex
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1453990_tn?1329235026
Welcome to the forum.

There is no relation to the size of the lesions and the symptoms.  Little microscopic lesions can put someone in a wheelchair and big huge lesions can seem to have no effect.  In neuroscience, it is all about location.  

Symmetric symptoms, both feet, both hands, both arms are pretty rare in MS.  Given that you seem to have symptoms symmetrically in both the upper and lower extremities for relatively short periods of time, I'd think they would examine your neck for a problem (granted, the facial symptoms could not be explained by a cervical issue.)

MS lesions develop pretty slowly and resolve even slower.  So many People with MS (PwMS) have pain or  paresthesias that last in a single location for weeks or months.  Feeling better and symptom free, will not change lesion load much, if at all.  There are atypical presentations of MS, but at this point, this sounds like it would be something else. Many of us have worked with our doctors to "watch and wait."  Other tests and appointments with specialists go on and we get MRIs every 6 - 12 months watching for things to change.

Trust your body and keep looking for what is wrong, but you may need to cast a wider net and consider things beside MS.  B-12, Fibro, other Neurological and non-neurological causes.

Bob
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198419_tn?1360245956
Hi there,

Thanks for joining us. Your tingling may not be related to lesions at all, nor may they be attacks. There are countless causes for what you describe.

In the context of MS, many cases of tingling does not constitute an attack. Just mentioning this to put your mind at ease where lesions and relapses, concerned.  Since your MRI shows normal, the doctor should be checking other avenues for you. Even small lesions will show when your not symptomatic.

I'm glad you found our forum here educational. Thank you for trusting us enough to post and say so. Hope we can help you move forward with next steps. When do you go back to the doctor? And, has the doctor mentioned what he/she is doing on your behalf to find out.

I agree with you - this can be super scary. Especially when a symptom rises and gets worse before it gets better, only to return.

Definitely don't let this doctor give you the run around,
Hope to help,
-Shell
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Avatar_f_tn
what if a person with ms has developed several black holes in a matter of weeks and is in a coma, is it possible to regain any of that information because of the short period of time or is it just gone?
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1999646_tn?1327368425
I had a minor neurological event in 1991 (fatigue and left leg weakness) my GP told me he didnt think I had an auto-immune disorder and sent me on my way. In 2002 I had a Major Neurological event. The Neurologists all said probable MS, but I didnt have any new activity in 3 years, no diagnosis. I recently December 2011 went to a New Neurologist in a different state who performed an MRI and she said there was vascular changes that were new compared to 2006 MRI. She couldnt diagnose me either with MS. She said it was probably Acute Demyenating Ensythro Mylitis (SP?) caused from a virus. I cant except that opinion due to the fact it occurs primarily in prepubescent children. Can the vascular changes be the "higher blood supply to the area to fight the attack" you explained above in your article? I am not experiencing any NEW neurological changes. Can this mean I am possibly going to have an event soon? I am going to seek a different opinion, of course.
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2090063_tn?1332767842
I have similar symptoms.  There is another autoimmune condition called Myasthenia Gravis.  It flares up with stress and often affects muscles of the neck and eyes first, then peripheral muscles (arms and legs, toes and fingers). It can cause spasms and severe cramps.

No lesions or plaques show up on MRI.  It is trickier to diagnose, although there is a blood test which shows antibodies related to acetylcholine receptivity. This neurotransmitter becomes blocked, and is responsible for conductivity to muscles.  It feels like your muscles just can't hold a charge for very long, and you need to rest, then after an hour or so you can function a little better.

I have had these problems ever since cervical spine surgery eight months ago.  Apparently, severe physical or emotional trauma can begin the whole process.

Hanna
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Avatar_f_tn
Thank you so much for your very informative explanation about MRI, I found it so interesting & explained in a very easy to understand format, which was not too technical. I have MS, confirmed about 15 yrs ago after an MRI scan. I had vague symptoms for many years, starting with Trigeminal Neuralgia & always being fobbed off by the different specialists over the years, culminating in an operation on my TM joint, years more pain etc. & it was many years later, after seeing the same Neurologist that I was told I did in fact have MS. My MRI scan result was never actually properly explained to me, so thank you. Shebubs
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Avatar_f_tn
Hi,

I have been having strange symptoms in the past 3 months such as different sized pupils, itching all over, tingling in my face, fatigue, ppins and needles in my feet and hands and face, and sometimes in other places on my body, dizziness, panic attacks, fast heart rate, seeing floaters. These symptoms very in severity from day to day. Some days I don't have any symptooms or just a couple sharp pains in my feet.  I have had an MRI with contrast and it was normal. I have seen an eye nero doctor and he said I was normal. Pls give any advise I am woundering if I have ms but my mri was normal.
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Avatar_f_tn
can u take a look at my MRI? i got Lyme 3 yrs ago, undiagnosed for 2 now have arthritis my hands and legs tremble i get sharp pins and needles in my legs feels like its twitching and before bad weather it acts up and i get a pain and numbness feeling i have constant migrains and the nurse said my MRI looks good but if its at the beginning maybe its to small to see, i feel like i see a couple white patches, small, please e mail me ***@****
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Avatar_f_tn
Anyone have any idea how radiologists differentiate between a "black hole" lesion in an MRI and something else?  I just got a brain MRI last week and the radiologist noted that the lesion on my frontal lobe is unchanged since last MRI... and there are several "punctate foci of hyperintensity in the inferior right frontal lobe" - which, in his opinion, is a "perivascular space" issue.  

I have a black hole lesion on my c-spine, so I know they show up dark in T1 and bright in T2 MRIs, which is exactly how these "foci" are presenting. I even found them in my MRI, before getting the results, because they stood out so much. They are clustered, and directly adjacent to my ventricle, which as I understand it, is a common feature of MS lesions.  I'm not saying these are, in fact, MS lesions, but am curious as to how radiologists tell the difference - and if it really is a judgement call.
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572651_tn?1333939396
Hi Cancan, Quix did a lot to get this forum started, but she isn't around here these days because she is busy taking care of herself.  Your question is so good, I am going to copy it and start a new question - hypointensities (black holes) sound horrible and it might help to understand them a bit more.

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Avatar_f_tn
Thanks!  That's a great idea. =)

Quix did such an excellent job at explaining what so much of this means - and I hope that she is doing well!

I really wish there was a class we all could take that would walk us through all of the inner workings of this disease. The doctors just don't seem to have enough time to sit down and go through this kind of thing with us in a thorough manner.
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Avatar_f_tn
I am in desperate need of some advice. I am a 38yr old female who has been suffering on and off for years with weird symptoms. However just recently with severe neck pain pins needles sore horrible legs and feet. Dropping smashing and spilling everything. Mri of brain showed many more then 9 lesions in periventricular white matter, but only a small suspected syrinx on c spine. Radiologist put strong consideration of demyelinating plaques. However neuro laughed at me said it was stress and smoking, regardless of pain in crazy spots under my skull big toe jaw patches of numbness blurry left eye leg giving out etc. I dont know what to do.... im not scared but cant ignore the symptoms. She wrote me off. Ive never felt so alone and almost crazy.
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Avatar_m_tn
I have no income or insurance, but the MSAA paid for a cranial MRI as I have almost all of the symptoms of MS. If I could email you the scans, could you help interpret them? I'd appreciate it if you could. Email: ***@****
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5112396_tn?1378021583
Hi rt66gv. A couple of things here; Quixotic1, a great resource to the community, is no longer actively participating on MedHelp. She would not likely see your message.

Secondly, this is a patient-led forum. There are no doctors here, at least in the relevant area. Also, giving this kind of information/advise in the manner you mention (via email) would questionable in the ethics area. A neurologist needs to see you in person in order to assess how the MRI imaging fits into your physical presentations.

However, if your scans came with a radiologist's report, we do have some members here who have a knack of turning 'doctor-speak' into 'plain-English' if you're having trouble understanding the findings.

Here we can give pointers, a sounding board, support and personal experiences, but we can't diagnose.

Perhaps you could go back to the MSAA (I assume you mean the Multiple Sclerosis Association of America) and they can give you information about neurologists that accept pro bono work or alternative sources of helping fund some professional assessments. Perhaps others here can give feedback on that as well.

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9871228_tn?1406397607
I am unable to have any more MRIs due to a Pacemaker.  So how can my neurologist tell my MS isn't active slowly progressing when all he does is check my reflexes.  It's quite frustrating.  He has ordered CT scans, but apparently they don't show anything. Help....what should I do or say
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