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OT can Hypothyroid really Make you this Sick?
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OT can Hypothyroid really Make you this Sick?

Okay I do not lay around and I have canceled all appointments including two riding lessons and therapy in the last week. I do a little  like unload the dishwasher and have to lay down. I usually soldier on and I can't. I have a headache like a duller LP headache which is better when I lay down. I can't catch my breath. I am tired.  My voice is weak.

I have only been on thyroid medicine one day. I hate to vetch. I keep thinking I am okay when I wake up then I go to the bathroom and wow!

Is this normal?

Alex
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572651_tn?1333939396
Alex, from what I understand it takes quite a while to get the thyroid medicines adjusted.  If this continues be sure to contact your doctors.

I have no personal experience with this issue - I hope somenone here can be of help to you.

hugs, Lulu
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I just wanted to say that when I was started on synthroid for hypothyroid, it took about a month before I really started feeling better. The thyroid can really mess with your body. The headache, weak voice and complete exhaustion sound alot like the probems I had when my thyroid was low.
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1312898_tn?1314571733
Alex,  I know it doesn't seem like it would be that big a deal but it is.  As someone has already said, it will take a while to get your levels right.  Your doctor will try one level, then do a blood draw and make adjustments.  I have adjustments now twice per year.  

Think of this in terms of insulin.  Insulin is just one part of our system but changes everything.  Damage to your other organs can take place when you aren't taking the thyroid.

Hypothyroidism makes you feel more fatigued, depressed, hungry name a few.  It took me quite a while before I felt much difference.  It would make the MS thing more difficult too.

Red
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1045086_tn?1332130022
Keep in mind Alex that thyroid medicine is one of the few where it makes a real difference if you are taking a generic medicine or the Synthroid brand.  The basic drug is the same but the binding agent in the generics differs from one manufacturer to the next and can change how well it is absorbed.

If you are using a generic and your pharmacy switches from one manufacturer to another you could see a huge differnece in how you feel based on how well each one works for you.  For that reason, some people choose to use only Snythroid.  Of course there is a large cost difference.

Just remember, take on an empty stomach for best absorption (30-60 minutes before a meal and at least 2 hours after your last meal).  And if the manufacturer changes, watch for symptoms.  You may need a blood test and dose readjustment.

Those things are down the line.  Hope you get to feeling better soon.

Mary
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751951_tn?1406636463
Happy to hear that you're alert enough to notice how bad you're feeling, and express your concerns about it.  You're heading in the right direction now, I believe.  Keep at it.
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1207048_tn?1282177904
I'm hoping the meds work very quickly for you! Please try to rest as much as you can.
~Jess
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429700_tn?1308011423
It is so difficult to know what is causing what. The tiredness can definitely cause you to feel sluggish.  I don't know about the headache that disappears when lying down.  This doesn't sound like the thyroid issue, but just because I've not experienced this doesn't mean much.  Have you tried drinking lots of water and caffeine?  Maybe you have a tiny leak of CSF.  If it's not gone by tomorrow, I'd call the doctor.  

The out of breath problem reminds me of when I was anemic.  Have you been tested for anemia recently?  

As you mentioned in your previous post--hypothyroidism can cause high blood pressure and high cholesterol.  It can also cause irregular heart beat, by the way.  Amazing, huh?  I never knew that the thyroid out of whack would do all of that (and more!).  There's some good books on hypothyroidism that you may want to read.  The list of symptoms of hypothyroidism is a mile long!

I hope you start to feeling better soon.  The thyroid medicine will take a while to do its job--at least a month (more than likely several months).

Deb
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429700_tn?1308011423
"The tiredness can definitely cause you to feel sluggish" ?????  That makes sense!  I was trying to say:

The hypothyroidism can cause you to feel sluggish and tired.

It can also cause a person to not think clearly, too (like in my case).  LOL  
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738075_tn?1330579444
Feel better, soon, sweetie!  I'm thinking of you.
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1253197_tn?1331212710
Just want to say I am so sorry that you are feeling so wretched, and sorry I have no experience of what you are going through.  I have been so inspired with your attitude and resilience to coping with things on a day to day basis and I am sure that this fortitude will help you get through this difficult patch.  Look at it as a bit of a dip on the rollercoaster and I hope once your body has got used to the new meds that the journey will continue in an upward path. It's oK to vetch so listen to your body and give in to the exhaustion. Get better soon

Love and hugs

Sarah x
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667078_tn?1316004535
Thanks guys. Actually I think I have a sinus infection on top of everything. I am headed to a week with my in laws in a couple of days. My mother always said I chose to get really sick at the most inconvenient time. May be there is something to be said for that.

You guys are the best support.

Alex

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I completely get where you are coming from.  I have Graves Disease, and after having RAI to treat it, my thyroid reversed and now I am on synthroid to regulate me. It was the worst transition, because immediatly following my radio active iodine, my doc's office was slow to check with me and start me on prescription right away.

Instead, I suffered with slowed up everything, heartbeat, speech, movement, muscle weakness, fatigue, l lost half of my eyebrows, my skin coloring turned grey, I was crying uncontrollably, I literally felt like I was dying.

When I called the office to tell them that I was feeling so awful that I needed to see them ASAP, I was told that they didn't have an opening until 3 months later. I hung up and called my GP.. Boy did my endo. get an earful. She was very angry and was concerned that I could have possibly ended up in a coma or dead had I not come to her right away.

Needless to say, she popped a synthroid in my mouth right then and there and I was also put on cytomel to speed the process of getting well.

I have had ups and downs still in getting regulated , but I have not felt like a walking zombie . THANK GOD !!!
I hope you have not had to experience that, but as long as you are on the right dose, and are checked often , you will be ok.

Good luck to you, Pamela
Sorry to bore you with my story, I just thought I'd share my own experience.
It's just like MS,,, no one is the same with their symptoms.
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751951_tn?1406636463
Pamela, I think your story probably helped some of us see another facet of thyroid problems.

My late father-in-law underwent surgery and radioactive iodine to destroy his hyperactive thyroid so they could regulate him with Synthroid.  That was when my late wife was in elementary school, probably around 1960 or so (which she often referred to as the Dark Ages of medicine).

Before his goiter was diagnosed, most thought he was mentally ill.  He lost half his body weight (and his job & home) before they found a doctor who understood what it really was.  In those days, it was a small-town family doc, who not only solved his medical problem, but let them move into his then-vacant household servants' home for a few years at no charge until the family could get back on their feet.
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Thank you.
I know that sometimes there are people out there that do not understand the whole concept of thyroid disease. It is sometimes looked at as the fat or skinny disease, but, from what I went through, it was definately more than that.

I hope this does help.  It helps me for talking about it. It is my therapy.

Pamela
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867582_tn?1311630997
Hi, Alex,

I think it's "kvetch."  Anyway, you're in the right place to do that!  So sorry to hear you're having hypothyroid issues.  I've been there.  After my total thyroidectomy, they kind of forgot I needed replacement so for over a week after the surgery I had no thyroid hormone replacement.  I remember not being able to walk across our supermarket then - legs like logs. Felt like the tin man with no oil.  When I reminded them I needed thyroid replacement, they put me on Synthroid and I had horrible heart palpitations that would come and go.  Scary.  Now things have settled down. Interesting, our different reactions to the same med.  

What is your TSH, free T4, free T3?  Synthroid only replaces your T4, not your T3.  So if your body does not convert T4 to T3 very well, you'll have low T3. Also that is why people on Synthroid usually have high T4.  Thyroid hormone is a delicate balance - over time, too high a dose can lead to heart disease, osteoporosis - too little can invite high cholesterol and cancer.  Don't be scared - this is all over time.  It takes a while to get your dose right.  The worst TSH I ever heard of was in the 80s - very unusual (don't know how that person even moved).  Synthroid is a synthetic hormone and some people do better on natural thyroid replacement - I did not.  Don't believe Synthroid was ever officially approved as new drugs now must be.  It was grandfathered in.  Anyway, your symptoms at present sound like mine - very fatigued, weak, hoarseness, weak voice.  But my TSH is within normal limits and I can lose weight fairly easily (if you're hypothyroid - too low- you supposedly can't).

Have you had your vitamin D and PTH (parathyroid hormone) checked lately?  See my new post about the condition of low D and high PTH leading to weakness, fatigue, falling etc.  

Hate to think you're missing your horseback riding!!!  Hope you get back on track soon!!

Hugs from WAF
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1386048_tn?1281015933
hi alex,
so i am hypothyroid and i don't know if someone mentioned it in a post above, but i find it really helps to take the med. in the morning with a full glass of water half an hour to an hour before eating anything.
apparently, the thyroid works to release the natural hormone in the morning anyway when one wakes so in taking the pill in the morn on an empty stomach, you can mimic the behaviour of the thyroid to the best possible degree.
also, yes, like everyone said, it does take a good month or so to start feeling better---this too also depends on the dosage your doc. started you off on.  a lot of doc.s will start slow and adjust accordingly as time goes on.
i feel for you, i know how hard that fatigue can be...i had it when i was parenting a newborn who slept no more than two hours a night!  i swear i did significant damage to myself during that sleep deprived time of life!!
feel better soon,
xo michelle
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