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Walking Limitations
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Walking Limitations

Does anyone understand how with a certain type of MS or at a certain stage of MS, we can recoup our walking ability if we "sit for a spell"? My entire 36 years with MS I have been blessed to have this be the case, and now after last winter I am decidedly worse, especially walking, but I can still recoup--it just takes longer sitting. Does it sound to you guys like I have still  just enough myelin to let the impulses through--so long as I am not overheated or overtaxed? Funny, I've just always accepted this as part of MS. I couldn't make it all the way into church Sunday ( when I parked across the street and down a little)and was all hunched over and taking tiny mincing steps when an 84 yr old came to my rescue (I called him my angel-I'm not proud). After an hour in a wheelchair in church I walked with my cane just as I have been. A nurse friend looked at me funny when I declared--That's MS. Well, sure it's not all with MS, but does it happen to some of you as well? There are always questions! Jane
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147426_tn?1317269232
Jed - In the HP called "Fatigue in epople with MS" I talked about the various mechanisms of fatigue:

http://www.medhelp.org/health_pages/Multiple%20Sclerosis/Fatigue-in-People-with-MS/show/63?cid=36

In the weakened muscles of MS there is the fatigue of exertion.  " 2) Increased fatigue of exertion. In people with muscle weakness, those muscles will fatigue faster in continued use. Nerves fibers affected by demyelination are susceptible to early exhaustion.  This exhaustion of muscle fibers can be overcome with frequent and early rest.

This is a huge factor in my weakness.  I can do all sorts of things in the morning after a night of rest that I can't do by late afternnoon.  A short rest allows me a little recouperation, but not much,

Quix
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690549_tn?1288886321
Thanks for the immediate response. Unfortunately, it makes a lot of sense. At least they don't recommend ice baths any longer. Anymore I'm about the same at night as in the day. I am having terrific problems with insomnia--I generally see 3:00 a.m. roll around. I usually sleep about two hours then am wide awake. Seldom take naps in the day. I get enough sleep because I can sleep in in the morning. Any wisdom here? Thanks, Jane
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Hi Jane

I know exactly what you mean, before my current relapse when I could walk a good bit further I would find that I got to a point where I simply couldn't walk any more without my legs threatening to give way. Even sitting for 5 minutes would let me recover enough to make it to the bus-stop or home.

Mand
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572651_tn?1333939396
Jane,
I can go just about forever, as long as I'm sitting! :-)

Its that getting up and movingthat wears me down.  I notice that sitting to take a break - sometimes a short one, but usually 15 minutes or so - allows me to get up and go again.  But then its usually for a shorter time before I need to sit again.

As the day wears on, my staying power shortens.  But sitting is essential to my getting up and moving!  

be well,
Lulu
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634733_tn?1316629592
Sounds like a pattern in this, I have the same issues. I can do more in the morning after a good nights sleep than later in tha day. If I have had a poor night (which it seems you are prone too) then I am useless all day.

Resting a while helps me get going again but not for as long as my original effort. My email to you about my recent holiday may throw some light that way.

Like Quix my neuro PT explained that it is the result of fatigued muscles and those with MS have muscles that tire much faster than 'normal'.

Even mental effort leading to cognitive fatigue will make me tired when I go to move

Stay positive

Hugs
Pat
x
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147426_tn?1317269232
I am amazed at the intertwining of mental and physical fatigue.  I agree with Pat that fatigue in one area means fatigue in another.  So if I have a "down" day physically, it's a good be that I'll be noodle-brained, too - and vice versa.

Q
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634733_tn?1316629592
So here's an interesting thing Quix, my neuro PT is currently trying acupuncture  with me to break what she sees as a pain-stress-pain cycle.

Her take is that the pain in my legs causes stress on a level in the brain that I am not aware of and this can then produce more pain then more stress - get the picture - well I don't get it at all.

I understand what she is saying and I asked her if that meant that if I worked on the stress levels the pain would go - but she said it was not that simple - I think that cognitive fatigue must be kicking in as this was way over my head - lol.

I seem to have moved from medics who told me I was stressed to medics who tell me that stress is a big part of my MS" Well at least I am dx I suppose.
Can you shed any light on this conundrum?

Pat
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572651_tn?1333939396
Pat, I would lump the stress question into the same chicken/egg answer we get for depression.

There is certainly stress and depression caused by the physical nature of our MS.  

There is also the emotional stress and depression caused by having MS - I don't think I have to list all those either.  

And I believe  they feed off of each other - emotional reaction fuels physical response.  Physical reactions stimulate emotional responses.

So which comes first?  It is quite the conundrum.

I think its great you are trying accupuncture - I am a fan of that myself and wish I could afford to go more often.

be well,
Lulu
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704043_tn?1298060444
ditto  gosh  if i do  nothing - i dont get to  fatigued-  but sometimes just  eating supper wears me out- and sleeping- i have went to sleep before my head hit the  pillow.
well  now  i can  not get to sleep  and when i do   i wake up- every hour  on the hour-

so frustrating!      tick
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690549_tn?1288886321
The neuro gave me lunesta for my insomnia and so far (2 nights) it's helped me fall asleep-not stay asleep, but I'm glad for any help. I'm trying both the 2 and 3 mg strengths.

Tonight's question is because I expected the neuro to have an answer and he didn't. As I become more and more fatigued with my walking, I keep bending farther down, down, down to the ground. Anybody else do this? It's instinctual, but surely there's a reason behind it-- like trying to lower my center of gravity or something. I look much worse than my 103 yr old friend (who still lives alone, by the way.) Any thoughts?
Thanks, Jane
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