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3mm Pituitary Microadenoma...can it cause problems?
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3mm Pituitary Microadenoma...can it cause problems?

My neurologist had me get a MRI last Friday and was told on Monday that a small pituitary microadenoma was apparent in the scan.  I wasn't told any details about it, only that I should follow-up with my endocrinologist.  I have been treated for hypothyroidism for two years, so I am familiar with this doctor.  When I consulted with her today, she said that it was 3mm and that it could even be a particle or a glitch.  

She said that it most likely isn't the cause of the low grade fevers that I've been dealing with for three months.  The neurologist thought that a pituitary tumor could cause them as it's located near the hypothalamus.  I have been feeling extremely bad for quite a while now.  I was really hoping for some kind of answer, some kind of cause for it.  I have constant pain (I was recently diagnosed with fibromyalgia), stomach troubles that don't seem to have a cause, lots of unexplained weight gain, and my eyes are troubling me a lot when they hadn't before.  

The endo wrote orders for bloodwork testing the pituitary hormones as well as means to collect a 24-hour urine sample to check cortisol levels.  She said she doubted the microadenoma was causing problems but just wanted to cover the bases.  I am very disheartened.  I don't know what to do.  If it's not causing the problems, then what is?  Any suggestions or input would be greatly appreciated.
1711789_tn?1361311607
Hi there!

Well, most pituitary adenomas are benign with little clinical significance and though a pituitary adenoma could cause altered body temperatures being located near the hypothalamus, an adenoma of 3 mm on the other hand is unlikely to be responsible for such changes. The microadenoma may or may not be responsible for the symptoms described and basic hormonal evaluation may be required for a definite conclusion. The symptoms described could result from local causes such as GI related issues, ophthalmic causes etc. If the adenoma comes out clear, I would suggest considering a detailed evaluation by an internist for the described symptoms and depending on the cause diagnosed/ suspected, it can be managed accordingly or specialist acre may be sought.
Hope this is helpful.

Take care!
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