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Brain damage due to low glucose
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Brain damage due to low glucose

I am not sure if this is under the right topic but it is the closest I could find...

In August 2010 my Mum, who is diabetic, went into a diabetic coma in her sleep due to dangerously low glucose levels. Mum remained in a non responsive state for a few weeks before gradually making some improvements but her recovery has been minimal in all honesty. We have been told the chances of her surviving were next to nothing, it is very rare someone has such low glucose for so long and survive, but I was wondering if anyone out there has experienced this same type of brain injury and can give advice on what we should expect? It is difficult to find anyone with this specific type of injury, especially in the UK where we are, because as a general rule people do not survive, none of the medical staff we have encountered along the way have seen a survivor of this type of braininjury before so they can't really advise us properly either. Any help would be appreciated. Anyone wishing to swap email addresses and share similar stories please do get in touch.

Thanks for your time.
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Avatar dr f tn
Hi there. Hypoglycemic attacks command prompt attention. If treated immediately, there will not be any permanent damage. if sugar levels are replaced with glucose candies etc as soon as insulin shock symptoms appear, blood sugar levels will be restored. However, if the symptoms are overlooked and treatment delayed, there will be irreversible brain damage. The patient may land up into a profound unconscious state. Usually does not wake up and there is no response to pain or light. Inability to perform voluntary actions, lack of the normal sleep, and wake cycles, though she might move, talk or do actions while comatose. The prognosis of coma depends on the cause of coma, the possibility to treat it and the time lost in identification and initiation of corrective measures. Discuss with your intensivist who has been treating her. Take care.

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Avatar n tn
Thank you for your response :)
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