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Buzzing and tingling in groin area and back of legs
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Buzzing and tingling in groin area and back of legs

Dear doctors,

I am a 34 year old woman. For two months I have been so worried that it is becoming difficult for me to live a normal everyday life.

Story:
10 months ago I experined low back pain at night. three times in about four weeks. The pain was deep and aching in the lowest part of the spine. ( same pain as when I am having my period, just stronger )

It then dissapeared.

Soon after I started having muscle fasciculations in my calves, which spread to both legs and thighs. Later on spread to lower abdominal area. No weakness or other things.

Two months ago I suddenly experience a buzzing feeling in my groin area ( more like genital area) it spreads to buttocks and thighs.
It is there every day and night, comes and goes over the day.

Fasciculations are still there, but not in the groin
area. ( has never been )

I now feel a sligt prickling in my fingers as well.



I have had a claen neuro examination, and a clean MRI brain scan.

I am so worried now, please tell me what could this be? Is it likely to me MS (or even ALS? )

Could the problems be spine related? If yes where in the spine would the problem be situated?

Could this be benign muscle fasciculation syndrome? Even with more buzzing and tingling than fasciculations?

I would be so greatfull for your comments. Doctors in my area donot seem to know what else to do. I am stuck with my symptoms.

Thank you so much.


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Avatar_n_tn
Fasciculations in the absence of muscle weakness and wasting is unlikely to be due to ALS. Benign fasciculations are much more common and may be due to exercise, cold, certain medications, an overactive thyroid, pinched nerves and some viral infections of the spinal cord like polio. Benign fasciculations are more likely  to be widespread. Sensory abnormalities due not occur in ALS. MS and ALS are rare disorders, so other causes by default are more likely unless testing and further problems are more suggestive. The MRI is quite sensitive for MS, although an MRI of the cervical spine should be done as well. Blood tests for thyroid function, electrolytes and some common causes of neuropathy should bedone such as B12, diabetes etc. A somatosensoru evoked potential of the median and tibial nerves can be a good way to screen for objective sensory disturbances.

Good luck
6 Comments
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Avatar_n_tn
I can certainly sympathize with your problems.  I too have had the buzzing and tingling for almost a year now.  It first started in my legs and has now moved to most of my body.  My vision is blurry, can't feel my feet, have pain going up and down my legs, weakness in my legs and arms.  It all first started in my right leg, then went to my right arm, now has progressed to my left side.

I have been to 4 neruologist, been in the hospital neurology floor, had all the MRI's done, blood work, spinal tap, etc. and NOTHING shows up. I have been looked at for MS numerous times and still nothing.  I'm terrified of it being MS and it just not showing up.  The last 2 neurologist said my case was one of the most difficult they've ever seen.  My current neurologist says she has never seen a case like mine.  I just received a letter from the Mayo clinic that my doctors was trying to send me to.  The Mayo said they had too many patient request and not enough appointment spaces and suggested that I seek another medical institute due to the urgency.

It took me 6 months to get my insurance to approve me to go to the Mayo.  I don't think I'll be walking in another 6 months if it takes my insurance that long again.

I hope you find help as I at times want to give up.  

Good Luck
Dawanna
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Avatar_n_tn
Thanks. I do not have Lyme desease. I have been checked for that.

I am stil hoping to get a reply form the neurologist.

regards
Jo
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Avatar_n_tn
If the ELISA test is so inaccurate, why do the doctors still use it for testing?  Why wouldn't they just use the Western Blot right off the bat???
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Avatar_n_tn
all above ..docters love you and your money........read up on what MSG and aspartame can do to you if you are sensative to them and it sure sounds like it to me
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Avatar_n_tn
Hi there.
I started searching the net for answers to my symptoms.  I saw your thread, Jo, and all of the others related to the buzzing and tingling in the groin area and I wanted to mention something that I have net seen anyone mention yet.....Cauda Equina Syndrome.  I had back surgery 3 years ago for a herniated disk L5-S1 and thank God have had no problems since.  There was a point however when I experienced something strange.  A "buzzing" feeling in my rectum like someone was flicking a switch.  It would come on for a few seconds, go away, come back, all periodically.  I did some research on this, there is a wealth of it on the internet.  My doctor also mentioned this as well, but it has since gone away so I am not concerned with it anymore.  It showed up after I installed a tile floor and was hunched over for 2 days installing tiles and pressing them down.  The Cauda Equina are the little "finger" nerves that exit the base of the spine and go through the buttocks down into the legs, seperate from the Sciatic nerve.  It is called Cauda Equina, Equine referring to, yes, horse.  It refers to the nerves in the butt and back of your legs that would be touching a saddle if you were riding a horse.  It can cause tingling, numbness, pain, come and go, or get bad to the point of what scared me the most, was loss of bowels and bladder function, as these nerves are solely responsible for the function of both of them.  If the tingling comes and goes, and is not constant, and seems to be aggravated due to maybe excessive activity or repetitive motion, ie bending at the waist like I was, I feel it is just an aggravation of the nerves and the use of anti-inflammatories and taking it easy worked for me.  I am no doctor, but believe me, since my back surgery, any little twinge of nerves sends me reeling with anxiety thinking I have done something to damage my back again.  My current issues are related to my upper back, a tingling to the left of my spine that radiates out to under my armpit, and soreness at times which feels like it in internal of my upper arm, and recently tingling in my forearm and fingers.  I also feel sporadic twinges in my calves, toes, once in my cheek, my doctor has referred me to a neurologist because of the upper back thing.  He thinks my neck may be involved as the cervical nerves also connect to the facial muscles and could cause the tingling in my cheek.  Maybe I need a good chiropractor, or maybe just too much straining lifting kids!  Good luck to all of you, I hope I have helped in some way.  There is a wealth of information out there, but don't let your mind go because of something you read on the internet.  Treat it in that you are knowledgeable and use it to your advantage when trying to find answers from your doctors.  Best of luck!!
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