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Cervical Spinal Cord / Nerve Compression & Neuropathy
Hi!

I am 46 years old.  I had an MRI of the cervical spine.  The following is what the report says:  

Findings: There is mild reversal of the cervical lordosis. Cervicomedullary junction appears within normal limits. Vertebral body height & alignment are normal throughout. Mild disc space narrowing at C5-6.

At C3-4, there is minimal early disc osteophyte complex in the right foraminal position which may cause very mild right sided neuroforaminal narrowing.
At C4-5, there is mild diffuse posterior disc osteophyte complex without central canal or neuroforaminal stenosis.
At C-5-6, there is mild to moderate diffuse posterior disc osteophyte complex which causes mild cord flattening & contributes to mild to moderate bilateral neuroforaminal stenosis. This appears somewhat worse on the right.
At C6-7, there is mild diffuse disc bulging without central canal stenosis. There may be very mild cord flattening. Bilateral mild neuroforaminal narrowing.

Current symptoms: neck pain, tingling/numbing hands & feet with occasional burning pain, headaches, ocassional dizziness, base of head pain, hand tremors, occasional lack of coordination when walking, periodic limb movements (awake & asleep). Diagnosed with peripheral neuropathy a couple months ago, prior to MRI. No known cause of neuropathy - no diabetes, B12 ok, no thryoid problems. Was in car accident 7 years ago that caused whiplash.  Have not felt good since!

QUESTIONS:
1. Would this be enough cord/nerve compression to cause peripheral neuropathy?
2. Would this be enough cord/nerve compression to cause tremors?
3. In your opinion, would surgery be recommended?
4. Are there other tests (other than nerve conduction) that could be performed that would diagnose nerve damage and its cause?
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