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Choke out = brain damage?
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Choke out = brain damage?

Hi,

I recently got choked out during a sparring session (brazilian jiu jitsu) and it was my first time. My partner said he let go of the choke pretty much as soon as my body went limp. Will this cause any significant brain damage? I don't feel dizzy or anything, but my parents are worried the effects may occur later on.

I don't know if this information will help but, basically my partner had his hand over my throat and pressed down on it. I suddenly blacked out for what seemed like a split second and I was lying on the floor. For some reason though, I momentarily forgot what I was doing and was day dreaming on the floor for about 2~3 seconds (I think?) and then I snapped back to reality. I feel fine but my parents think bjj may affect my studies and so I am curious as to whether being choked out like this really will affect my brain. Thanks!!
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Thanks for using the forum. I am happy to address your questions, and my answer will be based on the information you provided here. Please make sure you recognize that this forum is for educational purposes only, and it does not substitute for a formal office visit with your doctor.

Without the ability to examine you and obtain a history, I can not tell you what the exact cause of your symptoms was nor what the exact implications of your sports activities are. However I will try to provide you with some useful information.

Having pressure applied to the neck region as you describe above leads to reduction of blood flow to the brain. If severe or long enough, loss of consciousness (faining, body going limp) occurs because the brain is deprived of blood and therefore oxygen. Transient reduction in blood flow may not cause overt signs of brain damage, but at a cellular level, a certain amount of damage to the cells in the brain could theoretically occur, particularly when the reduction in blood flow is prolonged. If a long enough reduction of blood flow to the brain occurs, this could potentially lead to severe consequences such as brain damage.

Thank you for this opportunity to answer your questions, I hope you find the information I have provided useful, good luck.
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