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Constant Headaches
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This forum is for questions and support regarding neurology issues such as: Alzheimer's Disease, ALS, Autism, Brain Cancer, Cerebral Palsy, Chronic Pain, Epilepsy, Fibromyalgia, Headaches, MS, Neuralgia, Neuropathy, Parkinson's Disease, RSD, Sleep Disorders, Stroke, Traumatic Brain Injury.

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Constant Headaches

Hi, Ive been getting constant severe headaches since i was taken to the hospital when i fell dizzy whilst playing a football match in November 2011. I stayed in hospital for 1 night and left the next day, throughout that week my headaches were constant and i couldn't walk in a straight line so i was taken back up the hospital and was just given medicine which didnt work. After taking normal paracetamols which didnt work, i went back to the doctors for several weeks in a row but i was just given more medicine which didnt work. Ive had a blood test (which was normal) and MRI scan (which was normal). I will be visiting the neurological department at my local hospital on the 29th February 2012. I am a normal healthy 15 year old female. If any one could tell me what sort of tests the neurologist will do to me or if anyone has experienced anything similar and could identify what is wrong with me. Thanks.
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Thanks for using the forum. I am happy to address your questions, and my answer will be based on the information you provided here. Please make sure you recognize that this forum is for educational purposes only, and it does not substitute for a formal office visit with a doctor.

Without the ability to examine and obtain a history, I can not tell you what the exact cause of the symptoms is. However I will try to provide you with some useful information.

There are several causes of headaches. Headaches can be divided into primary and secondary. Primary headache disorders are headaches without a direct cause. These are diagnosed after secondary causes have been excluded. Secondary headache disorders are due to an underlying problem, there are many many causes but some include medication side effects, systemic illness, nervous system infection, tumors, bleeds in the brain or clots in the veins of the brain, trauma and others. (Was there any head injury with the football game associated with the headache)?

Primary headache disorders are much more common than secondary ones. There are several primary headache disorders, over 50 different types!  For example, migraines are a primary headache associated with a pulsating throbbing one-sided pain, nausea and discomfort in bright lights that last several hours. Another type is a cluster headache, which is a sharp pain that occurs around and behind the eye often at night and are associated with tearing of the eye and running of the nose. (Sometimes there are associated behaviors that are clues in diagnosis. For example in migraines, patients will want to lay in a dark, quiet room whereas in cluster headaches, they will want to “bash” their heads, walk around, etc). In primary stabbing headache, sharp or jabbing pain in the head occur, either as a single stab or a series of brief repeated volleys of pain. Primary stabbing headache often occurs in people with migraine. The pain itself generally lasts a fraction of a second but can last for up to one minute in some people. Another type of stabbing headache is called paroxysmal hemicrania. This is marked by episodes of stabbing or sharp pains that occur on one side of the head and may be associated with eye tearing or runny nose. Episodes may occur several times and last 30 seconds to a minute. Yet another type of stabbing headache is abbreviated SUNCT which can be 100s of stabbing pains lasting seconds and are associated with red eye and tearing.

Without further information about your headache, it is difficult to provide you with adequate information. However, it is important for you to understand that if you have not experienced headaches in the past and you are now having new head pains, seeing a neurologist is a good idea, just to make sure there is nothing serious causing this pain.

Thank you for this opportunity to answer your questions, I hope you find the information I have provided useful, good luck.

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