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Convulsive syncope
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Convulsive syncope


  I am a 21 year old college student and recently fainted in the library at school. I was with a friend and she says i had a seizure. When I awoke, I realized that I had been incontinent and my teeth hurt, like I had been clenching my jaw.  I felt dizzy and hot right before I passed out and sat down so I could calm down. According to my friend, I began stiffening my legs, arching my back out of the chair, clenching my jaw and fists and my eys rolled back. I went to the ER and my CT and EKG's were normal. I went to a neurologist and he said it sounded like convulsive syncope. The ER doc said it sounded like a vaso-vagal syncope. I am going for a EEG this week.  I have low blood pressure and have had incidents of hypothyroidism in the past.  I also had the flu when this happened.  I have been trying to get some advice about how to prevent future spells of this. No one seems to give me any. Any advice?
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Convulsive syncope is a disorder in which the brain reacts to the temporary depribation of blood abnd oxygen which occurrs during a faint by generating brief seizure activity. This is a benign condition and does not suggest that epilepsy will develop at any point in the future.
The treatment of the problem is to appoach the fainting episodes as the primary problem, if the fainting does not occurr then the convulsive will not happen.
It is prudent to do an EEG, it should be normal if you actually do have convulsive syncope. The most important test is probably the EKG to ensure that you do not have a cardica rhythm disturbance which caused you to faint.
The managemnet of this problem is to prevent other episodes of fainting, this means identifying factors and situations which lead to fainting like fatigue or low blood sugar. If there is a recurrant tendancy to faint more elaborate testing of blood pressure responses to posture etc are required. One such test is the tilt table test where your blood pressure and pulse responses to various angles of elevation are checked. This should only be necesary if the problem becomes very frequent, if it is significant medication odr a high salt diet ( to maintain the blood pressure ) is recommended.





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