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Dizziness
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Dizziness

I have been getting dizzy/light headed lately. I have had this happen before and usually would go away in 2-3 weeks.  It especially gets bad when I lay stay down on my back.  As my head hits the pillow the room immediately spins.  If I lift my head up I am fine.  I was getting a massage and the person massaged an area around  my neck  and it caused the dizziness to happen.  It is so bad that in a matter of seconds I throw up.  I went to an ear, nose, and throat specialist.  They did a lot of test and found nothing.  Does anyone have any suggestions.
Tags: dizziness
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Hi,
     How are you? Vertigo is the feeling that you or your environment is moving or spinning. It differs from dizziness in that vertigo describes an illusion of movement. When you feel as if you yourself are moving, it's called subjective vertigo, and the perception that your surroundings are moving is called objective vertigo. In your case it is objective vertigo. Do you have any other symptoms like ringing in ears, head ache, hearing loss etc.

Vertigo can be caused due to benign positional vertigo, head injury, acoustic neuroma, labyrinthitis, meniere’s disease, hemorrhage in the brain and migraine etc. Benign positional vertigo (BPV)-or simply vertigo-is a disorder of the inner ear. You feel a sudden sensation of movement or spinning when you move your head or hold it in a certain position. The inner ear is located within your skull and consists of the cochlea, a chamber shaped like a snail shell, where sound is transformed to nerve signals for the brain, and 3 semi-circular canals that function like a gyroscope, relaying information about head position and movement to the brain.

The semicircular canals contain fluid and special sensors that, when disturbed, inform the brain of a change in head position. It is thought that when you have BPV small particles become dislodged within the inner ear and then bounce around when your head moves, triggering faulty signals that your head is still moving even after it stops. This sensation of movement or imbalance when you are not moving is called vertigo, the primary symptom of benign positional vertigo.
I would suggest that you visit a ENT specialist and discuss about the possible options and follow his advise.
Best.

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