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EEG reading
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EEG reading

Dear Doctor, I am interested in your opinion re the EEG readings I was given. Photo of the actual EEG recording after sleep deprivation can be found in the epilepsy community forum under the same title (EEG readings) since it could not be attached to this question. According to the initial opinion ‘the EEG finding after sleep deprivation shows elements of epileptiform activity fronto-temporally (right)’ – circles on the recording made by the 1st neurologist. According to the 2nd neurologist I consulted the first opinion ‘represents a case of overreading’, especially since the subsequent MRI (conducted according to the epilepsy protocol) showed no lesion. Would you tend to concur with the former or the latter opinion? Much obliged.
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Thanks for using the forum. I am happy to address your questions, and my answer will be based on the information you provided here. Please make sure you recognize that this forum is for educational purposes only, and it does not substitute for a formal office visit with your doctor.

Our role on this website does not include review of testing done such as EEG or imaging. Without viewing your EEG, I can not comment on whether or not you have an EEG abnormality. However, I will try to provide you with some general information. First, it is important to remember that many normal healthy people without epilepsy, without a history of seizures, may have abnormalities on EEG. Clinical correlation, meaning correlation of abnormal EEG findings to the clinical history and other testing, is essential.
It is also important to understand that unfortunately, the interpretation of EEG is somewhat subjective, and you may find one neurologist disagrees with the read of another. In general, epileptologists have the most experience with EEGs, but they may disagree among themselves too. There are many findings on EEG called normal variants, meaning a variation in the EEG pattern that is not abnormal or pathologic just less common than other findings. These normal variants sometimes required an experienced reader to distinguish them from pathologic findings.

In cases when there is discrepancy, it is again important to correlate with the clinical picture, imaging findings, etc. Also when there is doubt, a repeat EEG at a center experienced for this test (where the EEG is read by an epilepsy specialist or an experienced neurologist) is sometimes necessary.

Thank you for this opportunity to answer your questions, I hope you find the information I have provided useful, good luck.
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