Neurology Expert Forum
Foot drop
About This Forum:

This forum is for questions and support regarding neurology issues such as: Alzheimer's Disease, ALS, Autism, Brain Cancer, Cerebral Palsy, Chronic Pain, Epilepsy, Fibromyalgia, Headaches, MS, Neuralgia, Neuropathy, Parkinson's Disease, RSD, Sleep Disorders, Stroke, Traumatic Brain Injury.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
This expert forum is not accepting new questions. Please post your question in one of our medical support communities.
Blank Blank

Foot drop

My daughter racewalks competitively.  She is fourteen years old.  During the last three summer competitions she experiencec occasional foot drop.  There is no pain and no numbness, but she cannot control her foot.  She has not racewalked since the summer and has not had any more problems.  The doctors cannot find anything after two MRI tests on her brain and spine.  They also did a nerve reaction test with no results.  We don't know how to proceed from there.  She would like to continue racewalking, but as a parent I am concerned with the consequences of having any more bouts of foot drop.  Does anyone have any resources or help for us.
Related Discussions
Avatar_n_tn
Ask your daughter if it's truly footdrop in which she is unable to bend at the ankle with her toes pointed toward the face or if its just not under her control when she's running and kind of bends or twists funny. Her symtpoms sound like she's experiencing a movement disorder called dystonia which is the sustained contraction of muscles with oppositie functions. So extension and flexion muscles contract at the same time, producing a repetitive, twisting motion that is out of the patient's control. It can start out with very certain or specific activities like walking, writing, or playing the piano and can be limited to only one part of the body. Your daughter may have a childhood onset dystonia which by itself can be a benign condition. But if there's something causing it, she will need to be looked at more closely by a pediatric neurologist. There are also some dystonias that respond to dopamine.

Take your daughter to see a pediatric neurologist for a thorough exam and perhaps a more extensive lab workup to rule out metabolic abnormalities. FOr more info, you can write to www.dystonia-foundation.org. Best of luck
Blank
Continue discussion Blank
Blank
Request an Appointment
MedHelp Health Answers
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
RSS Expert Activity
233488_tn?1310696703
Blank
New Cannabis Article from NORTH Mag...
Jul 20 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
3 Reasons Why You are Still Binge E...
Jul 14 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eating: What Your Closet ...
Jul 09 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank