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Full body numbness/loss of sensation
Hi guys,

For a few years now my body would go numb in the middle of showering but everything would go back to normal immediately after finishing. But a few weeks ago the numbness came back (on the bus on the way to work) and hasn't gone away since. It's difficult to explain. I can function normally (ride a bike, etc) but just can't feel things. For example when I turn a door knob, I can feel the temperature and pressure against my hand but not the doorknob itself. If i pinch myself I can't really feel it until I pinch hard enough. I've done research but can't find any info on numbness throughout the entire body. I'm getting worried that it is permanent since it's been a month since it came and hasn't subsided. Thanks in advanced and ANY info would be greatly appreciated.
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Hi, are you overweight, because i feel this is happening to me to, i feel like i can't feel the inside of my body but i can feel the outside, (weird can't explain) i am really worried, i'm only 25 and in college. I did start a diet today because how scared i am, i feel like my body is shutting down, sooooo scared, anxiety kicks in too.
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Hi there. Numbness and tingling are two most common symptoms of multiple sclerosis.  You need to check with a neurologist for a detailed clinical examination and other relevant investigations. Apart from clinical neurological examination MRI shows MS as paler areas of demyelination , two different episodes of demyelination separated by one month in at least two different brain location. Spinal tap is done and CSF electrophoresis reveals oligoclonal bands suggestive of immune activity, which is suggestive but not diagnostic of MS. Demyelinating neurons transmit nerve signals slower than non demyelinated ones and can be detected with EP tests. These are visual evoked  potentials, brain stem auditory evoked response, and somatosensory evoked potential. slower nerve responses in any one of these is not confirmatory of MS but can be used to complement diagnosis along with a neurological examination, medical history and an MRI and a spinal tap. Hope this helps. Take care.
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