Neurology Community
General anesthesia and peripheral neuropathy
About This Community:

This forum is for questions and support regarding neurology issues such as: Alzheimer's Disease, ALS, Autism, Brain Cancer, Cerebral Palsy, Chronic Pain, Epilepsy, Headaches, MS, Neuralgia, Neuropathy, Parkinson's Disease, RSD, Sleep Disorders, Stroke, Traumatic Brain Injury.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank Blank

General anesthesia and peripheral neuropathy

I suffer from severe peripheral neuropathy of both feet and occasional slight numbness in both hands for approximately 6 years now. No origin of cause has been found- all blood tests have been normal for everything the family doctor can think of. I take Cymbalta 60mg daily which did help slightly but is starting to not help as well.
In Nov. of 2007 I had outpatient surgery for which I given general anesthesia. My concern is that in recovery,while coming to, my feet felt like they were on "FIRE" and the whole "FOURTH OF JULY" was going off in my feet. It was unbearable and excruciating. The recovery people had no idea what was going on and finally after much pleading gave me some benadryl but pill form. That took about 35min. to begin working but the symptoms only finally subsided after 3hours.
   I am being scheduled for knee surgery soon and I'm concerned about this happening again. The surgeon says it would be extremely difficult to do the procedure under local.  WHAT SHOULD I DO?


This discussion is related to Effects of anesthesia on Peripheral Neuropathy?.
Related Discussions
2 Comments Post a Comment
Blank
144586_tn?1284669764
The first thing that should be done is to request the original operating room records (if they exist) and determine exactly what was injected into your bloodstream. There are several choices of anesthetic. The look up the pharmaceutical in the PDR and then contact the FDA and ask for the person in charge of that product (every product has one person assigned) and explain to them your problem and ask them if there were other complaints. If you are concise and don';t bother them with irrelevant quaetions, you will get an answer.

You are correct to be concerned.

It appears that you may have had a reaction to a specific medication. There is always nitrous oxide. You might want to contact a surgeon who uses hypnosis, which has worked quite well. I know some people who have had major procedures done this way.

I would seriouly think about finding another hospital and operating team. The fact they treated the initial problem so lightly concerns me.
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
Thank you for your response.  I have passed your suggestions onto my anesthesiologist. They did ask for the op reports and are looking into it and will let me know what they find.
I definitely agree with you about how they responded to me; this surgery will be at another hospital and both surgeon and anesthesiologist do not want to procede until they feel comfortable-- a delay in repairing my knee but increases my confidence in these doctors.
   Thank you again.  I hope more people will respond who have had this happen to them.
Blank
Post a Comment
To
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
Neurology Community Resources
RSS Expert Activity
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
The 3 Essentials to Ending Emotiona...
Sep 18 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Control Emotional Eating with this ...
Sep 04 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eating Control: How to St...
Aug 28 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
Top Neurology Answerers
338416_tn?1260996698
Blank
jensequitur
Fort Worth, TX
620923_tn?1405964489
Blank
selmaS
Allentown, PA
10389859_tn?1409925468
Blank
Foggy2
352007_tn?1372861481
Blank
LisaJF
1780921_tn?1384615710
Blank
flipper336
Chandler, AZ
Avatar_m_tn
Blank
Ball123