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Headache on right side with sudden severe nosebleed
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Headache on right side with sudden severe nosebleed

I am a 26 yearold female with no current health issues. However, several days ago I noticed blood in stool. The very same day I was driving down the road and suddenly my nose began to bleed. It lasted for about thirty minutes. The blood was flowing heavily and even started come from my mouth. During this time I spit up several large clots. I have no history of nosebleeds, so this incident was frightening. Several days before the nosebleed I had a severe headache. It has been 3 days since that incident. Today I had a strange headache on the right side of my head above my right eye. It lasted several hours, but after taking excederin it went away. However, when I arrived home from work around 630 pm, I had another nosebleed. This one was not nearly as bad as the first though. I am just curious as to what is causing this? Does it sound like something serious or am I just overthinking the incident because I've never had nosebleeds? I must say I have a history of migraines and seizures. However, I haven't had either in years. In my early teens up until I was 20, I had bad migraines and seizures/blackouts. At that time I was put on several meds such as depakote and topomax (topamax), but I no longer tame any type of medicine. I just wanted to know if this seems like something serious enough to visit the doctor...I don't have insurance so it will be pricey! So, I don't want to be overanalyzing and go for no reason!
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Thanks for using the forum. I am happy to address your questions, and my answer will be based on the information you provided here. Please make sure you recognize that this forum is for educational purposes only, and it does not substitute for a formal office visit with a doctor.

Without the ability to examine and obtain a history, I can not tell you what the exact cause of the symptoms is. However I will try to provide you with some useful information.

There are several causes of headaches. Headaches can be divided into primary and secondary. Primary headache disorders are headaches without a direct cause. These are diagnosed after secondary causes have been excluded. Secondary headache disorders are due to an underlying problem, there are many causes but some include medication side effects, systemic illness, nervous system infection, tumors, bleeds in the brain or clots in the veins of the brain, and others.

Primary headache disorders are much more common than secondary ones. There are several primary headache disorders, over 50 different types.  For example migraines are usually a pulsating throbbing one-sided pain with nausea and discomfort in bright lights that lasts several hours. Another type is cluster headache, which is a sharp pain that occurs around and behind the eye often at night and associated with tearing of the eye and running of the nose. In primary stabbing headache, sharp or jabbing pain in the head occur, either as a single stab or a series of brief repeated volleys of pain. Primary stabbing headache often occurs in people with migraine. The pain itself generally lasts a fraction of a second but can last for up to one minute in some people. Another type of stabbing headache is called paroxysmal hemicrania. This is marked by episodes of stabbing or sharp pains that occur on one side of the head and may be associated with eye tearing or runny nose. Episodes may occur several times and last 30 seconds to a minute. Yet another type of stabbing headache is abbreviated SUNCT; 100s of stabbing pains lasting seconds occur and are associated with red eye and tearing.

Without further information about your headache, it is difficult to provide you with adequate information. However, it is important for you to understand that if you have not experienced headaches in the past and you are now having new head pains, seeing a physician and/or neurologist is a good idea, just to make sure there is nothing serious causing this pain. Imaging of the brain and sometimes then neck may be indicated depending on your exact symptoms, your physical examination, and other factors. Also, given the nosebleeds, you should have your blood count evaluated as well as your blood pressure. Again, I recommend that you be seen by a physician.

Thank you for this opportunity to answer your questions, I hope you find the information I have provided useful, good luck.

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