Aa
A
A
Close
Avatar universal
Help understanding mri result
My ENT ordered a CT of the temporal bone and an MRI of the head as part of some diagnositic tests after an oddly abnormal VNG and audiogram test.  The CT showed things with my semicircular canals are just fine and the ENT thinks that whatever is triggerin the vertigo is not with the ear and has referred me to a neurologist because of two things.  First, I have a history of migraines (diagnosed in my 20s based on descriptions of headaches and family history) and second, the MRI findings include the language:

There is mild chronic microvascular ischemic gliosis in the periventricular and subcortical white matter bilaterally.  The ventricles are within normal limits in size, position and configuration. No enhancing supratentorial mass.  The orbital contents are unremarkable.

Can someone explain this in language that I might understand?  And is it possible that my chronic dizziness and my veritgo spells might be related to this?

I am a 52 years old female who is 5'1'' and weighs 107lbs.  I've never been overweight, have no history of high blood pressure or diabetes or high cholesterol, and have never smoked.  I have been recently been diagnosed with sleep apnea and have been using a CPAP machine for about 3 months.  Although I use the CPAP every night, I have had problems adjusting to the pressure and I still feel extremely tired, weak, and sleepy during the daytime.

Thank you
Cancel
2 Answers
Page 1 of 1
338416 tn?1420049302
Gliosis is scar tissue in the brain - what it sounds like is you have a bit of damage in the periventricular and subcortical white matter.  The damage, however, is not in an area that would cause dizziness and vertigo.  

What strength was the MRI?  Sometimes a low-resolution MRI will miss things that a higher-strength MRI will catch.
Comment
Cancel
Comment
Avatar universal
Comment
Comment
Submit Comment
Avatar universal
I don't know what the strength of the MRI was.  Any way to tell?  I have a cd with the MRI pictures on it at home.  The CT scan was high resolution because they were looking for a problem with my superior semicircular canal, but that scan indicated the superior semicircular canal seems to be just fine.

Comment
Cancel
Comment
Avatar universal
Comment
Comment
Submit Comment
Your Answer
Avatar universal
Answer
Know how to answer? Tap here to leave your answer...
Answer
Submit Answer
A
A
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
Neurology Community Resources
RSS Expert Activity
233488 tn?1310696703
Blank
Marathon Running Done Over Many Yea...
05/15 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
233488 tn?1310696703
Blank
New Article on Multifocal IOL vs &q...
05/15 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
748543 tn?1463449675
Blank
TMJ/TMJ The Connection Between Teet...
01/15 by Hamidreza Nassery , DMD, FICOI, FAGD, FICCMOBlank
Top Neurology Answerers
620923 tn?1452919248
Blank
Allentown, PA
Avatar universal
Blank
11079760 tn?1449081557
Blank
Minneapolis, MN
209987 tn?1451939065
Blank
AB
5265383 tn?1465260698
Blank
ON
1780921 tn?1462244109
Blank
Queen Creek, AZ