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Idiopathic Brain Calcification
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Idiopathic Brain Calcification

A few years ago I went through some tests after requesting to see a specialist regarding problems with my right eye.  It droops, at times this is quite obvious, other times, barely noticeable.  The sight also seems to vary and I found myself actually lifting the skin sometimes if I was looking at something, so as to make the eye open wider.  It is also very noticeable on photographs, and looks as though that eye is looking in another direction.  According to the tests, which weren't extensive, my eye health is fine.

My question however, is regarding a brain scan I had at this time.  The last specialist I saw mentioned there was idiopathic calcification on my brain.  She didn't explain anything about this, mumbled to herself about several conditions but barely interacted with me regarding my results.  I was her last patient of the day, everyone had gone home, I'd waited an extra 4 hours even though I had an appointment and during the brief meeting, a colleague came and sat in the room, waiting for her so they could leave together.

Now... at the time I just accepted it but as time has gone on, I feel I should have had more information on this and maybe I'm being paranoid, but I'm wondering if there may actually be something serious here that hasn't been investigated.

I'm sorry for the babbling but I wanted to add the background info to paint a better picture of what happened.

Should I be worried?  Should I request further investigation into this brain calcification?

Thanks.
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1093617_tn?1279305602
Hello, Thank you for your question. Abnormal calcification in brain including ventricles, pineal gland and brain membranes (meninges) occur in response to some inflammation due to a number of possibilities. A neurologist should be consulted in this regard. He may conduct EEG and MRI/CT scan of brain to reach to final diagnosis of the cause of calcification of the meninges. Additionally, if the cyst is large it can cause headache, paralysis, seizures and gait disorders. Therefore, surgical intervention is essential to remove the large cyst and if permanent damage needs to be avoided. Therefore it is best to consult him to know the details of your health and diagnosis as he has full knowledge of the reports and can clinically examine you.  Hope this information is useful to you.
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