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I'm so scared that I may have to have a spinal tap
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I'm so scared that I may have to have a spinal tap

I don't know why but lumbar puncture is terrifying to me. I may need the test and I don't know how I can go through with it because I am so scared. I'm scared of the pain and the possibility of a spinal leak and complications. If you have went through this test please tell me if it is really horrible. Thanks. I know I'm a baby but I can't help it.
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Hello Dear
Lumbar puncture is a diagnostic and at times therapeutic procedure that is performed in order to collect a sample of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for biochemical, microbiological, and cytological analysis, or occasionally as a treatment ("therapeutic lumbar puncture") to relieve increased intracranial pressure.
What is the indication for the lumbar puncture in your case?
The most common purpose for a lumbar puncture is to collect cerebrospinal fluid in a case of suspected meningitis, since there is no other reliable tool with which meningitis can be excluded.
Lumbar punctures may also be done to inject medications into the cerebrospinal fluid.
A lumbar puncture requires aseptic technique (sterile) and performance by qualified and skilled medical practitioners.[citation needed]
In performing a lumbar puncture, first the patient is usually placed in a left (or right) lateral position with his/her neck bent in full flexion and knees bent in full flexion up to his/her chest, approximating a fetal position as much as possible
Headache with nausea is the most common complication; it often responds to analgesics and infusion of fluids and can often be prevented by strict maintenance of a supine posture for two hours after the successful puncture.
Headache that is persistent despite a long period of bedrest and occurs only when sitting up may be indicative of a CSF leak from the lumbar puncture site. It can be treated by more bedrest, or by an epidural blood patch, where the patient's own blood is injected back into the site of leakage to cause a clot to form and seal off the leak.
However, the procedure is safe and very useful if done meticulosly.
Allay your fears and apprehension and be confident.
It is not an uncommon procedure.
(Ref: http://www.emedicine.com/neuro/topic557.htm)
Best.
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464237_tn?1315674393
Thanks for responding, you asked why I may need this procedure : to check for MS and other possible diseases that may be causing my extreme Vertigo. I am just so scared of all medical procedures especially SPINAL TAP, I can barley handle an IV.
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