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Is persistent muscle twitching normal?
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Is persistent muscle twitching normal?

hi ive posted before about my recent long term headaches that have progressed into sore neck and back (along the spine) pain , but more recently ive noticed my bones cracking and my muscles twitching ALOT. My hands, arms, neck, and calves is where the twitching occurs. When i wake up in the morning im very sore in the neck and back but it wears off to a certain extent after i shower. The twitching never subsides though and has been happening for over a week. When i went to the hospital all tests came back normal except a CT scan showing a cyst in my sinus, which is something the doctor said they werent concerned about.

I am just wondering if the symptoms i have are related to each other, caused by the cyst, or something else going on. I just dont feel that muscle twitching on the daily is a normal thing even though im able to work and do all of the things im usually able to do.
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464237_tn?1315674393
It is not normal. I hate how doctors just don't seem to really try and get to the bottom of things! Have you been tested for Lyme disease?  Is it possible that you have been bitten by a tic in the past? Google it and see what you think. I really hope you feel better soon.
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Avatar_f_tn
Ive googled lyme disease but ive had no strange rashes or anything like that which is mthe main symptom they said. I just hope i can deal with this and soon!
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1268057_tn?1399131913
Have you had any images of your spine done, i.e. Cervical MRI?  
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Avatar_f_tn
When I went into the ER they did an x ray of some sort of my neck and spine and said everything was normal. I inquired abotu an MRI but the doctor told me that if she felt it was necessary she would have done one. Im making an appointment with an actual neurologist this week to get to the bottom of this myself.
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1268057_tn?1399131913
I think this is coming from your spine and you will need an MRI to rule this out.

Hopefully, the Neurologist will ordered an MRI.  Plus, I would have bloodwork done to make sure this is not r/t a virus, bacterium or a metabolic problem.  

I would also rule out Lyme's as an above poster recommended.  You don't necessarily have to have the "rash" to have Lyme's.  There are people who have been diagnosed with Lyme's and NEVER noticed a rash.  Sometimes patients present with a few symptoms of a disease or a disorder; you don't have to have ALL of the symptoms necessarily.  

Your Neurologist should be able to do all this for you.  
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Avatar_dr_f_tn
Hi there.  There are certain causes responsible for muscle twitching like diet deficiency, drug overdose, and side effects of diuretics, corticosteroids, estrogens, exercise, benign twitches, and nervous system conditions like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or ALS, muscle dystrophy, spinal muscular atrophy and myopathy. Your neurologist needs to look into these conditions one by one. The other possible cause could be multiple sclerosis and is a diagnosis of exclusion. The symptoms of multiple sclerosis are loss of balance, muscle spasms, numbness in any area, problems with walking and coordination, tremors in one or more arms and legs. Bowel and bladder symptoms include frequency of micturition, urine leakage, eye symptoms like double vision uncontrollable rapid eye movements, facial pain, painful muscle spasms, tingling, burning in arms or legs, depression, dizziness, hearing loss, fatigue etc. The treatment is essentially limited to symptomatic therapy so the course of action would not change much whether MS has been diagnosed or not. Apart from clinical neurological examination, MRI shows MS as paler areas of demyelination, two different episodes of demyelination separated by one month in at least two different brain locations. Spinal tap is done and CSF electrophoresis reveals oligoclonal bands suggestive of immune activity, which is suggestive but not diagnostic of MS. Demyelinating neurons, transmit nerve signals slower than non-demyelinated ones and can be detected with EP tests. These are visual evoked potentials, brain stem auditory evoked response, and somatosensory evoked potential. Slower nerve responses in any one of these is not confirmatory of MS but can be used to complement diagnosis along with a neurological examination, medical history and an MRI in addition, a spinal tap. Therefore, it would be prudent to consult your neurologist with these concerns.Take care.

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